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Results 21 - 34 of 34.


Physics - Electroengineering - 26.06.2019
Researchers observe shortest magnetic event
Researchers observe shortest magnetic event
By Christoph Pelzl For the first time ever, physicists have been able to change the magnetic moment of a material using a light wave within one femtosecond - the fastest magnetic event ever observed. Additional at the end of the text Electronic properties of materials can be directly influenced via light absorption in under a femtosecond (10 -15 seconds), which is regarded as the limit of the maximum achievable speed of electronic circuits.

Physics - Electroengineering - 13.06.2019
Radiation Damage in Microelectronics
Radiation Damage in Microelectronics
By Alicja Michalowska-Forsyth, Varvara Bezhenova Reliability is a wide-ranging subject in microelectronics, covering responses to different kinds of stress as well as measures to increase devices' tolerance against them. This includes ionising radiation stress, which affects device characteristics, leading to circuit degradation.

Materials Science - Electroengineering - 23.05.2019
Washable, wearable battery-like devices could be woven directly into clothes
Washable, wearable battery-like devices could be woven directly into clothes
Researchers have developed washable, wearable 'batteries' based on cheap, safe and environmentally friendly inks and woven directly into fabrics. The devices could be used for flexible circuits, healthcare monitoring, energy conversion, and other applications. The team, led by Dr Felice Torrisi , who recently joined Imperial from the University of Cambridge, have shown how graphene - an atom-thick sheet of carbon - and other related materials can be directly incorporated into fabrics.

Physics - Electroengineering - 22.05.2019
Scientists break record for highest-temperature superconductor
University of Chicago scientists are part of an international research team that has discovered superconductivity-the ability to conduct electricity perfectly-at the highest temperatures ever recorded. Using advanced technology at UChicago-affiliated Argonne National Laboratory , the team studied a class of materials in which they observed superconductivity at temperatures of about minus-23 degrees Celsius (minus-9 degrees Fahrenheit)-a jump of about 50 degrees compared to the previous confirmed record.

Electroengineering - Computer Science - 06.05.2019
Adding satnav to turn power grids into smart systems
Adding satnav to turn power grids into smart systems
6 May 2019 An ESA-backed project is harnessing satnav to insert an intelligent sense of place and time to power grids, to provide early warning of potentially dangerous electricity network failures. Four years ago an apparent fire from nowhere forced the evacuation of 5 000 people from central London.

Electroengineering - 02.05.2019
New material to pave the way for more efficient electronic devices
New material to pave the way for more efficient electronic devices
Researchers at the University of Bristol have successfully demonstrated the high thermal conductivity of a new material, paving the way for safer and more efficient electronic devices - including mobile phones, radars and even electric cars. The team, led by Professor Martin Kuball at the Center for Device Thermography and Reliability (CDTR) [MK1] , found that by making an ultra-pure version of Boron Nitride it was possible to demonstrate its thermal conductivity potential for the first time, which at 550W/mk is twice that of copper.

Environment - Electroengineering - 26.04.2019
Using 60% less water in paper production
Using 60% less water in paper production
An EPFL researcher has developed a mathematical model for optimizing heat transfer in factories and dramatically reducing water and energy consumption. The model could, in theory, cut water use by 60% at a Canadian paper mill and allow the facility to produce as much as six times more power. Manufacturing consumer goods requires vast quantities of water, heat and electricity.

Physics - Electroengineering - 21.02.2019
How to Freeze Heat Conduction
How to Freeze Heat Conduction
Physicists have discovered a new effect, which makes it possible to create excellent thermal insulators which conduct electricity. Such materials can be used to convert waste heat into electrical energy. Every day we lose valuable energy in the form of waste heat - in technical devices at home, but also in large energy systems.

Physics - Electroengineering - 20.02.2019
The holy grail of nanowire production
The holy grail of nanowire production
EPFL researchers have found a way to control and standardize the production of nanowires on silicon surfaces. This discovery could make it possible to grow nanowires on electronic platforms, with potential applications including the integration of nanolasers into electronic chips and improved energy conversion in solar panels.

Electroengineering - Physics - 15.02.2019
A transformer to drive the transition from AC to DC
A transformer to drive the transition from AC to DC
EPFL researchers have developed a compact and efficient medium-frequency transformer. Their device is poised to enhance the flexibility and efficiency of tomorrow's smart grids and DC power distribution networks. An EPFL-made prototype has been thoroughly tested and presented in several tutorials designed for experts from the academic and industrial worlds.

Physics - Electroengineering - 14.02.2019
Giving keener
Giving keener "electric eyesight" to autonomous vehicles
On-chip system that detects signals at sub-terahertz wavelengths could help steer driverless cars through fog and dust. Autonomous vehicles relying on light-based image sensors often struggle to see through blinding conditions, such as fog. But MIT researchers have developed a sub-terahertz-radiation receiving system that could help steer driverless cars when traditional methods fail.

Physics - Electroengineering - 12.02.2019
Los Alamos teams with Oak Ridge, EPB to demonstrate next-generation grid security tech
Los Alamos teams with Oak Ridge, EPB to demonstrate next-generation grid security tech
Quantum science comes to energy grid network protection Our partnership with Oak Ridge and EPB shows that utilities can realize the benefits of quantum security using a mix of distinct but interoperable communication systems. Ray Newell LOS ALAMOS, N.M. Feb.

Physics - Electroengineering - 01.02.2019
’Magnetic graphene’ switches between insulator and conductor
Researchers have found that certain ultra-thin magnetic materials can switch from insulator to conductor under high pressure, a phenomenon that could be used in the development of next-generation electronics and memory storage devices.

Electroengineering - Materials Science - 28.01.2019
Converting Wi-Fi signals to electricity with new 2-D materials
Converting Wi-Fi signals to electricity with new 2-D materials
Device made from flexible, inexpensive materials could power large-area electronics, wearables, medical devices, and more. Imagine a world where smartphones, laptops, wearables, and other electronics are powered without batteries. Researchers from MIT and elsewhere have taken a step in that direction, with the first fully flexible device that can convert energy from Wi-Fi signals into electricity that could power electronics.