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Social Sciences - Computer Science - 27.11.2019
Researchers get 'glimpse into a human mind' as it makes choices in groups, social media
Researchers get ’glimpse into a human mind’ as it makes choices in groups, social media
The choices we make in large group settings - such as in online forums and social media - might seem fairly automatic to us. But our decision-making process is more complicated than we know. So, researchers have been working to understand what's behind that seemingly intuitive process. Now, new University of Washington research has discovered that in large groups of essentially anonymous members, people make choices based on a model of the "mind of the group" and an evolving simulation of how a choice will affect that theorized mind.

Social Sciences - Health - 27.11.2019
Opinion: Depression - men far more at risk than women in deprived areas
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Social Sciences - 26.11.2019
Children of abused mothers 50 per cent more likely to have low IQ
In the study academics from the universities of Manchester, Bristol, Manchester Metropolitan and Kings College London found 13 per cent of children whose mothers did not experience domestic violence had an IQ of below 90 at eight years of age. If their mothers experienced physical violence from their partner either in pregnancy or during the first six years of the child's life, the figure rises to 22.8 per cent.

Social Sciences - 26.11.2019
Dating and relationship violence a significant issue among young people in Wales
Dating and relationship violence (DRV), including both physical and emotional violence, is a significant issue among young people in Wales, academics say. Cardiff University researchers analysed survey data from nearly 75,000 students aged 11-16, from 193 schools in Wales. Of young people with dating experience, 17% of boys and 12% of girls said that they had experienced physical violence by a romantic partner at least once.

Law - Social Sciences - 25.11.2019
New researchers Law and Development
The Law and Development Research Group welcomes Tomaso Ferrando (research professor), Antidius Kaitu, Tefera Addis (PhD researchers) and Anne Oloo (Sustjustice coordinator). The Law and Development Research Group welcomes Tomaso Ferrando (research professor), Antidius Kaitu, and Tefera Addis (PhD researchers).

Social Sciences - 22.11.2019
Rare medieval manuscript telling the legend of Charlemagne discovered in Dundee
Professor Marianne Ailes , a specialist in medieval French narrative poetry has identified rare fragments of the French poem Fierabras (composed c. 1200), recovered from a sixteenth-century binding in Dundee City Archives. The identification came about by a happy coincidence of circumstances when Dr Julian Luxford of St Andrews University came across the fragments when working in the archive.

Social Sciences - 21.11.2019
Women raised in deprived neighbourhoods face an increased risk of intimate partner violence
Women who spend longer periods of their early lives in less affluent neighbourhoods are at greater risk of experiencing violence during their early adulthoods at the hands of their intimate partners, finds a new study published in Epidemiology . Intimate partner violence - physical, psychological, or sexual violence committed by a current or former partner - is the most common form of violence experienced by women worldwide.

Social Sciences - Politics - 21.11.2019
Growing diversity does not increase votes for anti-immigration candidates
Growing diversity does not increase votes for anti-immigration candidates
Donald Trump's anti-immigration views were a feature of his 2016 presidential campaign. To what extent was his unexpected victory driven by voters' anger over immigrants moving into their neighborhoods, attending their children's schools, or working in local businesses? Not at all, according to a new study co-authored by Yale political scientist Gregory A. Huber.

Social Sciences - 21.11.2019
Women who spend their childhoods in deprived neighbourhoods face an increased risk of intimate partner violence
Intimate partner violence - physical, psychological, or sexual violence committed by a current or former partner - is the most common form of violence experienced by women worldwide. In the UK, an estimated 7% of women (approximately 1.1 million women) reported experiencing this violence in the last year alone according to the latest Crime Survey for England and Wales.

Social Sciences - 20.11.2019
Would people be willing to give their personal data for research?
The study published in PLOS ONE today [Wednesday 20 November] investigated whether the donation of personal data could be a publicly acceptable act to support the use of consumer personal data for academic research. The researchers developed a new questionnaire that measured individuals' motivations for donating data, which could be used in future research on data donation in different contexts, such as medical data.

Social Sciences - 20.11.2019
High school textbooks present social movements largely as a thing of the past
Social movements increasingly appear in textbooks worldwide - but more often as part of history and less as a form of contemporary citizenship. Education might be a powerful force for social change, but textbooks worldwide are more likely to present social movements as historical events than as a form of active citizenship, according to a new study by researchers at Stanford Graduate School of Education (GSE).

Health - Social Sciences - 19.11.2019
Depression puts South African girls at higher risk of contracting HIV
South African Actresses Khomotso Manyaka, right, and Keaoboka Makanyane, left, starred in the 2010 Oscar-nominated film "Life, above all," a drama about the impact of the impact of HIV-AIDS in their country. A new UC Berkeley-led analysis suggests that addressing the mental health needs of teen women in South Africa may help stem the spread of the disease.

Social Sciences - Health - 19.11.2019
Estimating undiagnosed abnormal heart rhythm cases in older adults
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a type of abnormal heart rhythm linked to higher risk of cardiovascular diseases, including stroke. A risk factor for AF is increasing age; however, it is unclear how many older adults likely have the condition. A new study from the University of Minnesota, led by recent School of Public Health graduate Mary Rooney, examined the prevalence of undiagnosed AF in thousands of older adults.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 18.11.2019
Among transgender children, gender identity as strong as in cisgender children
Among transgender children, gender identity as strong as in cisgender children
Children who identify as the gender matching their sex at birth tend to gravitate toward the toys, clothing and friendships stereotypically associated with that gender. Transgender children do the same with the gender they identify as, regardless of how long they have actually lived as a member of that gender.

Health - Social Sciences - 18.11.2019
Immigrants don’t move state-to-state in search of health benefits
When states expand public health insurance to include low-income, legal immigrants, it does not lead to out-of-state immigrants moving in search of benefits. Immigrants, once settled in a particular state, will not move to another state in search of public health benefits, Stanford researchers find. Their research, published Nov.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 15.11.2019
How nematodes outsmart the defenses of pests
How nematodes outsmart the defenses of pests
The western corn rootworm, one of the world's most damaging maize pests, can use plant defense compounds to defend itself against its own natural enemies, so-called entomopathogenic nematodes. However, the nematodes can become immune against these compounds in turn, which enhances their ability to fight the western corn rootworm, as researchers at the University of Bern show.

Social Sciences - Health - 14.11.2019
Community cooking programme improves eating in young children and families
Community cooking programme improves eating in young children and families A Glasgow-based community cooking programme has been shown to improve family eating and could help to combat poor diets. The six week NHS programme, which included one cookery class a week and practical guidance on how to choose healthier foods was assessed by researchers at the University of Glasgow and deemed to have a positive impact on families' cooking and children's eating habits.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 14.11.2019
DNA data offers scientific look at 500 years of extramarital sex in Western Europe
DNA data offers scientific look at 500 years of extramarital sex in Western Europe
KU Leuven researchers combined DNA data with long-term genealogical records to explore questions of biological fatherhood in Western Europe over the last 500 years. These days, it's easy to resolve questions about paternity with over-the-counter test kits. Now, KU Leuven researchers have put DNA evidence together with long-term genealogical data to explore similar questions of biological fatherhood on a broad scale among people living in parts of Western Europe over the last 500 years.

Social Sciences - 13.11.2019
University reading lists dominated by white European men
University reading lists are not representative of the student body and tend towards overrepresentation of white, male and Eurocentric viewpoints, a new study from UCL has found. The study, published in Higher Education, analysed 144 authors of Social Science papers and 146 authors of Science papers included in two university reading lists, gathering data on gender, ethnicity and the country in which the researchers' affiliated institutions were based.

Social Sciences - Health - 11.11.2019
Aging in good health: the inequalities are widening
Aging in good health: the inequalities are widening
UNIGE researchers have been analysing the rise in healthy life expectancy in Switzerland since 1990 and measuring the differences based on an individual's level of education. Life expectancy in Switzerland has been growing steadily for decades. But have these additional years been spent in good health or, on the contrary, do they only prolong the ills of an aging population?