news 2020

Pharmacology - Jan 20
Disparities in drug prescribing suggest that black and Asian people with dementia are not receiving the same quality of care as their white peers, according to a new UCL-led study in the UK. Asian people with dementia are less likely to receive anti-dementia drugs, and take them for shorter periods, according to the findings published in Clinical Epidemiology .
Physics - Jan 20
Physics

ETH scientists have further developed QLED technology for screens. They have produced light sources that for the first time emit high-intensity light in only one direction.

Environment - Jan 20
Environment

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Health - Jan 20

Women who experience premature menopause are significantly more likely to develop multiple chronic conditions, according to a new study by The University of Queensland. School of Public Health PhD student Dr Xiaolin Xu analysed data on more than 11 thousand women aged 45 to 50 in 1996 and tracked them until 2016, as part of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health.

Pedagogy - Jan 20
Pedagogy

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Pharmacology - Social Sciences - 20.01.2020
Racial disparities in drug prescriptions for dementia
Disparities in drug prescribing suggest that black and Asian people with dementia are not receiving the same quality of care as their white peers, according to a new UCL-led study in the UK. Asian people with dementia are less likely to receive anti-dementia drugs, and take them for shorter periods, according to the findings published in Clinical Epidemiology .

Physics - Chemistry - 20.01.2020
Platelets instead of spheres make screens more economical
Platelets instead of spheres make screens more economical
ETH scientists have further developed QLED technology for screens. They have produced light sources that for the first time emit high-intensity light in only one direction. This reduces scattering losses, which makes the technology extremely energy efficient. QLED screens have been on the market for a few years now.

Health - 20.01.2020
Premature menopause increases risk of chronic health issues
Women who experience premature menopause are significantly more likely to develop multiple chronic conditions, according to a new study by The University of Queensland. School of Public Health PhD student Dr Xiaolin Xu analysed data on more than 11 thousand women aged 45 to 50 in 1996 and tracked them until 2016, as part of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.01.2020
Local water availability is permanently reduced after planting forests
Local water availability is permanently reduced after planting forests
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Pedagogy - 20.01.2020
Becoming less active and gaining weight: downsides of becoming an adult
Becoming less active and gaining weight: downsides of becoming an adult
For Cambridge students For our researchers Business and enterprise Colleges and Departments Email and phone search Give to Cambridge Museums and collections Undergraduate Events and open days Fees and finance Postgraduate Postgraduate courses Fees and funding Frequently asked questions International students Continuing education Executive and professional education Courses in education How the University and Colleges work Visiting the University

Earth Sciences - Palaeontology - 17.01.2020
Dinosaurs died because of an asteroid impact
Dinosaurs died because of an asteroid impact
Researchers disprove theory of volcanic eruption as reason for mass deaths / Mineralogists and planetologists of the University of Münster participating in worldwide study in "Science' Was it volcanic eruptions in western India or an asteroid impact that caused the death of dinosaurs and many other animal species 66 million years ago? Researchers have been discussing this since the 1980s.

Computer Science / Telecom - 17.01.2020
App uses voice analysis, AI to track wellness of people with mental illness
A new study finds that an interactive voice application using artificial intelligence is an effective way to monitor the well-being of people being treated for serious mental illness. Researchers from UCLA followed 47 people for up to 14 months using an application called MyCoachConnect. The data were collected from 2013 and 2015.

Social Sciences - 17.01.2020
Older ethnic minority adults have fewer close friends
Older adults from ethnic minority groups report having fewer close friends and fewer friends who live locally than older white people, according a new UCL study. The research, published in  Ageing & Society , found that Black and Asian adults over the age of 65 years are almost twice as likely to report having no close friends (9% and 7% respectively) compared to White and mixed or 'other' ethnicity adults of the same age (both 4%).

Physics - 17.01.2020
Ultrafast Camera Takes 1 Trillion Frames Per Second of Transparent Objects and Phenomena
A little over a year ago, Caltech's Lihong Wang developed the world's fastest camera, a device capable of taking 10 trillion pictures per second. It is so fast that it can even capture light traveling in slow motion. But sometimes just being quick is not enough. Indeed, not even the fastest camera can take pictures of things it cannot see.

Health - Chemistry - 17.01.2020
Ingestible medical devices can be broken down with light
Ingestible medical devices can be broken down with light
New light-sensitive material could eliminate some of the endoscopic procedures needed to remove gastrointestinal devices. A variety of medical devices can be inserted into the gastrointestinal tract to treat, diagnose, or monitor GI disorders. Many of these have to be removed by endoscopic surgery once their job is done.

Chemistry - Physics - 17.01.2020
Chemists allow boron atoms to migrate
Chemists allow boron atoms to migrate
Organic molecules with atoms of the semi-metal boron are among the most important building blocks for synthesis products that are needed to produce drugs and agricultural chemicals. However, during the usual chemical reactions used in industry, the valuable boron unit, which can replace another atom in a molecule, is often lost.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.01.2020
Why we differ in our ability to fight off gut infections
Why we differ in our ability to fight off gut infections
Scientists at EPFL have published two papers showing how genetics affects the ability of different individuals to fight off gut infections. ?he ability of the immune system to fight off bacterial, viral and other invading agents in the gut differs between individuals. However, the biological mechanism by which this happens is not well understood, but at least part of this difference may be explained by genetic factors.

Life Sciences - Environment - 16.01.2020
Scientists uncover how an explosion of new genes explain the origin of land plants
Scientists have made a significant discovery about the genetic origins of how plants evolved from living in water to land 470 million years ago. The new study, led by scientists from the universities of Bristol and Essex and published today [16 January] in Current Biology , challenge the established view of the origin of plants on land, and reveal that compared to the origin of animals, plants are better at inventing new genes during periods of evolution.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.01.2020
Latest tech in clinical grafts' A 'universal' blood vessel
Latest tech in clinical grafts’ A ’universal’ blood vessel
Yale doctors have developed a way to create vascular grafts from stem cells that are as strong as the original blood vessels they would replace. The advance, demonstrated in an animal model, may lead to bioengineered grafts suitable for transplant into any human patient using universally compatible cell lines, said the researchers.

Earth Sciences - Palaeontology - 16.01.2020
In death of dinosaurs, it was all about the asteroid - not volcanoes
Volcanic activity did not play a direct role in the mass extinction event that killed the dinosaurs, according to an international, Yale-led team of researchers. It was all about the asteroid.

Pharmacology - Health - 16.01.2020
Cheap roundworm drug found to enhance the effects of chemotherapy in prostate cancer
Scientists at the University of Glasgow and Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute have tested close to 1000 existing medicines and discovered that a cheap drug commonly used to treat parasitic worm infection could be a game-changing treatment for prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer affecting men and the second most common cause of cancer death for men in the UK.

Physics - Materials Science - 16.01.2020
Finds billions of quantum entangled electrons in 'strange metal'
Finds billions of quantum entangled electrons in ’strange metal’
Physicists provide direct evidence of entanglement's role in quantum criticality In a new study, U.S. and Austrian physicists have observed quantum entanglement among "billions of billions” of flowing electrons in a quantum critical material. The research, which appears this week in Science, examined the electronic and magnetic behavior of a "strange metal” compound of ytterbium, rhodium and silicon as it both neared and passed through a critical transition at the boundary between two well-studied quantum phases.

Business / Economics - 16.01.2020
Should You Take the Bet?
The decision to buy a lottery ticket, gamble on a stock, or buy an insurance policy often comes down to an assessment of risk. How much do I have to lose or gain? For centuries, economists have debated about when somebody should take or walk away from a bet. Now, in new research from Caltech and Yale University, economists are weighing in on the conversation with new mathematical arguments that take a person's overall uncertainty in life into account.

Environment - Social Sciences - 16.01.2020
Small change for climate change: Why research funding to save the world needs to be drastically stepped up
Small change for climate change: Why research funding to save the world needs to be drastically stepped up
Researchers from the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs and the University of Sussex analysed USD 1.3 trillion of research funding around the world. Between 1990 and 2018, less than 4.59% of the funding was spent on climate-related research. Only 0.12% of the research funding was spent on a critical issue: how to change societies to mitigate climate change.

Social Sciences - 16.01.2020
Far-right violence in Portugal draws strength from skinhead roots - study
Far-right agitators in Portugal now have different reasons to their 1970s predecessors for becoming radicalised and committing acts of political violence - a new study shows. Influenced by the international ‘skinhead' movement from the mid-1980s, current extremists drawn largely from the working classes have turned to violence to ‘protect' white Portugal and Europe against the ‘threat' posed by multi-racial and multicultural society.
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