news 2020

Life Sciences - Oct 23
Life Sciences
Pioneering research, published in  Proceedings of the Royal Society A , into ancient tides during the Late Silurian - Devonian periods (420 million years ago - 380 million years ago), suggests that large tides may have been a key environmental factor in the evolution of bony fish and early tetrapods, the first vertebrate land-dwellers.
Health - Oct 23
Health

World-leading AI technology developed by the Cambridge Centre for AI in Medicine and their colleagues - some of which is being showcased this week at the North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference 2020 - offers a glimpse of the future of precision medicine, and unprecedented predictive power to clinicians caring for individuals with the life-limiting condition.

Chemistry - Oct 23

Final-year chemical engineering students at The University of Queensland are investigating how sugarcane can be used as a clean energy source to create hydrogen. Professor Damien Batstone said bagasse and other agricultural residues were an abundant resource that could generate “green? or carbon-negative hydrogen at scale.

Psychology - Oct 23
Psychology

Using an experiment conducted in a simulated group office environment, ETH researchers have proved for the first time that repeated workplace interruptions cause the body to increase the release of stress hormones. And they do so to a higher degree than the perceived psychological stress.

Health - Oct 23

A large study shows that preventive treatment of children with antimalarial drugs reduces clinical malaria and anaemia in sub-Saharan Africa.


Category


Years
2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008


Results 1 - 20 of 3476.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 174 Next »


Life Sciences - Environment - 23.10.2020
Large tides may have been a key factor in the evolution of bony fish and tetrapods
Large tides may have been a key factor in the evolution of bony fish and tetrapods
Pioneering research, published in  Proceedings of the Royal Society A , into ancient tides during the Late Silurian - Devonian periods (420 million years ago - 380 million years ago), suggests that large tides may have been a key environmental factor in the evolution of bony fish and early tetrapods, the first vertebrate land-dwellers.

Health - 23.10.2020
Machine learning comes of age in cystic fibrosis
Machine learning comes of age in cystic fibrosis
World-leading AI technology developed by the Cambridge Centre for AI in Medicine and their colleagues - some of which is being showcased this week at the North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference 2020 - offers a glimpse of the future of precision medicine, and unprecedented predictive power to clinicians caring for individuals with the life-limiting condition.

Psychology - Health - 23.10.2020
Workplace interruptions lead to physical stress
Workplace interruptions lead to physical stress
Using an experiment conducted in a simulated group office environment, ETH researchers have proved for the first time that repeated workplace interruptions cause the body to increase the release of stress hormones. And they do so to a higher degree than the perceived psychological stress. According to the Job Stress Index 2020 compiled by Stiftung Gesundheitsförderung Schweiz, a Swiss health foundation, almost one-third of the Swiss workforce experience work-related stress.

Chemistry - Environment - 23.10.2020
Students find sweet positives in carbon-negative hydrogen
Final-year chemical engineering students at The University of Queensland are investigating how sugarcane can be used as a clean energy source to create hydrogen. Professor Damien Batstone said bagasse and other agricultural residues were an abundant resource that could generate “green? or carbon-negative hydrogen at scale.

Health - Pharmacology - 23.10.2020
School children benefit from preventive malaria treatment
A large study shows that preventive treatment of children with antimalarial drugs reduces clinical malaria and anaemia in sub-Saharan Africa. In several regions affected by the tropical disease malaria there are programmes in schools to preventively treat children with antimalarial drugs. An international consortium of researchers, including Michael Zimmermann, Professor of Human Nutrition at ETH Zurich, has now for the first time analysed the effectiveness of such programmes in a meta-analysis using individual data.

Computer Science - 23.10.2020
Pump down the volume: study finds noise-cancelling formula
Pump down the volume: study finds noise-cancelling formula
Noisy open plan offices full of workers hunched over desks while wearing noise cancelling headphones could soon be a thing of the past, thanks to new research from The Australian National University (ANU).

Health - Social Sciences - 22.10.2020
How a Twitter hashtag provides insights for doctors and support for people with breast cancer
Sean Brenner Posts using the #BCSM hashtag have generated 4 billion impressions over the past nine years, according to a UCLA-led study. A UCLA-led review of nine years of social media posts with the hashtag #BCSM suggests that Twitter can be a useful resource not only for patients, but also for physicians and researchers.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 22.10.2020
Like humans, chimps prioritize positive relationships as they age
Like humans, chimps prioritize positive relationships as they age
Humans prioritize close, positive relationships during aging, which can support physical and mental health. But these social aging behaviors are also found in wild chimpanzees, who seek interactions with other group members in increasingly positive ways as they get older, according to a new study published in Science Oct.

Physics - Materials Science - 22.10.2020
Do the twist: Making two-dimensional quantum materials using curved surfaces
Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have discovered a way to control the growth of twisting, microscopic spirals of materials just one atom thick. The continuously twisting stacks of two-dimensional materials built by a team led by UW-Madison chemistry Professor Song Jin create new properties that scientists can exploit to study quantum physics on the nanoscale.

Innovation - Materials Science - 22.10.2020
Future VR could employ new ultrahigh-res display
Future VR could employ new ultrahigh-res display
Repurposed solar panel research could be the foundation for a new ultrahigh-resolution microdisplay. The OLED display would feature brighter images with purer colors and more than 10,000 pixels per inch. By expanding on existing designs for electrodes of ultra-thin solar panels, Stanford researchers and collaborators in Korea have developed a new architecture for OLED - organic light-emitting diode - displays that could enable televisions, smartphones and virtual or augmented reality devices with resolutions of up to 10,000 pixels per inch (PPI).

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 22.10.2020
Oxford COVID-19 vaccine follows its programmed genetic instructions, independent analysis finds
The AstraZeneca Oxford COVID-19 vaccine (ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 and also known as AZD1222) now undergoing Phase III clinical trials, has already undergone rigorous testing to ensure the highest standards of quality and safety. Now a team at Bristol University has used recently developed techniques to further validate that the vaccine accurately follows the genetic instructions programmed into it by the Oxford team.

Health - 22.10.2020
UW seeks Latinos caring for relatives, friends with dementia to develop better training program
UW seeks Latinos caring for relatives, friends with dementia to develop better training program
With Latinos 1.5 times more likely to have dementia than non-Latino whites, among other health disparities , researchers at the University of Washington are hoping to better understand Latino family caregivers and adapt the training available to those caregivers. To do that, the UW Department of Health Services is seeking to interview Latino caregivers for a study to increase the cultural relevance of  STAR-C   training - a non-pharmacological intervention endorsed by the Administration on Aging that trains caregivers to manage the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia.

Social Sciences - Health - 22.10.2020
Tackling COVID-19: Professor Sarah-Jayne Blakemore
Her plans to study the effects of social isolation on adolescents have become particularly pertinent this year. Sarah-Jayne Blakemore is a cognitive neuroscientist who has spoken out about the importance of supporting and empowering young people, not suppressing and blaming them, during the pandemic.  I usually work in the University's Department of Psychology on the Downing Site.

Environment - 22.10.2020
Lake Kivu: Danger of a lethal gas eruption is not increasing
Lake Kivu: Danger of a lethal gas eruption is not increasing
The findings of a new measurement campaign on Lake Kivu in Africa show that, contrary to previous assumptions, the methane concentration in the water is relatively stable or increasing only very slowly. Therefore, the risk of a sudden gas eruption from the lake is currently not increasing. Photo story of the measurement campaign in March 2018 on Lake Kivu, East Africa.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.10.2020
Multiple Sclerosis as the Flip Side of Immune Fitness
About half of the people with multiple sclerosis have the HLA-DR15 gene variant. A study led by the University of Zurich has now shown how this genetic predisposition contributes to the development of the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis in combination with environmental factors. The decisive factor is the shaping of a repertoire of immune cells which - although they are effective in fighting off pathogens such as Epstein-Barr virus - also attack brain tissue.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 22.10.2020
Big-hearted corvids
Big-hearted corvids
Taking a look at generosity within the crow family reveals parallels with human evolution. Working together to raise offspring and increased tolerance towards group members contribute to the emergence of generous behavior among ravens, crows, magpies and company - similarly as it did for our human ancestors.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.10.2020
How bacteria reinforce their protective shield
How bacteria reinforce their protective shield
Researchers at the University of Basel have discovered a new mechanism by which bacteria ensure that their outer cell membrane remains intact and functional even under hostile conditions. This mechanism is important for the pathogen's survival in the host. The study provides new insights underlying pathogenic virulence.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.10.2020
Cutting-edge tech propels cardiac surgery forward
Cutting-edge tech propels cardiac surgery forward
In a world-first preclinical study, Australian researchers have shown it could be possible to implant a potentially life-saving pump into the heart of those with heart failure, without leaving the ICU or breaking isolation restrictions for the sickest COVID-19 patients. With up to 40 percent of COVID-19 deaths attributed to heart failure, the work shows immense promise and the researchers are eager to see it progress to human studies.

Life Sciences - 21.10.2020
Cognitive Elements of Language Have Existed for 40 Million Years
Cognitive Elements of Language Have Existed for 40 Million Years
Humans are not the only beings that can identify rules in complex language-like constructions - monkeys and great apes can do so, too, a study at the University of Zurich has shown. Researchers at the Department of Comparative Language Science of UZH used a series of experiments based on an -artificial grammar- to conclude that this ability can be traced back to our ancient primate ancestors.

Environment - 21.10.2020
Vanilla cultivation under trees promotes pest regulation
Research team led by University of Göttingen investigates agroforestry systems in Madagascar The cultivation of vanilla in Madagascar provides a good income for small-holder farmers, but without trees and bushes the plantations can lack biodiversity. Agricultural ecologists from the University of Göttingen, in cooperation with colleagues from the University in Antananarivo (Madagascar), have investigated the interaction between prey and their predators in these cultivated areas.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 174 Next »

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |