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Health - Life Sciences - 30.12.2020
Moving towards new cancer therapies with computer simulations at IDSIA USI-SUPSI
Moving towards new cancer therapies with computer simulations at IDSIA USI-SUPSI
From a research hypothesis in experimental biology to the possible application in the field of anticancer therapies, through computer simulations. This is the essential course of an interdisciplinary and international research project that has identified the mechanisms by which particular peptides can penetrate cell membranes and contribute to the elimination of tumors.

Physics - 30.12.2020
Physicists convince with their study in optics and photonics
Physicists convince with their study in optics and photonics
A publication by researchers led by physicist Prof. Cornelia Denz is among the world's 30 most groundbreaking papers of 2020, according to the journal Optics & Photonics News. In its special annual end-of-year issue, the journal selects the research highlights of the past year in the fields of optics and photonics.

Social Sciences - 30.12.2020
Couple life: dating apps don't destroy love
Couple life: dating apps don’t destroy love
Contrary to earlier concerns, a UNIGE study has shown that people who met their partners on dating applications have often stronger long-term relationship goals, and that these new ways of meeting people encourage socio-educational and geographical mixing. Mobile apps have revolutionised the way people meet in Switzerland and elsewhere in recent years.

Life Sciences - 29.12.2020
A single gene 'invented' haemoglobin several times
A single gene ’invented’ haemoglobin several times
Thanks to the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii , an animal whose genes have evolved very slowly, scientists from CNRS, Université de Paris and Sorbonne Université, in association with others at the University of Saint Petersburg and the University of Rio de Janeiro, have shown that while haemoglobin appeared independently in several species, it actually descends from a single gene transmitted to all by their last common ancestor.

Physics - Materials Science - 29.12.2020
Detective work in theoretical physics
Detective work in theoretical physics
Scientific articles in the field of physics are mostly very short and deal with a very restricted topic. A remarkable exception to this is an article published recently by physicists from the Universities of Münster and Düsseldorf. The article is 127 pages long, cites a total of 1075 sources and deals with a wide range of branches of physics - from biophysics to quantum mechanics.

Life Sciences - Physics - 29.12.2020
Sugars influence cell-to-surface adhesion
Sugars influence cell-to-surface adhesion
How can cells adhere to surfaces and move on them? This is a question which was investigated by an international team of researchers headed by Prof. Michael Hippler from the University of Münster and Prof. Kaiyao Huang from the Institute of Hydrobiology (Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China).

Life Sciences - 29.12.2020
A single gene 'invented' haemoglobin several times
A single gene ’invented’ haemoglobin several times
Thanks to the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii , an animal whose genes have evolved very slowly, scientists from CNRS, Université de Paris and Sorbonne Université, in association with others at the University of Saint Petersburg and the University of Rio de Janeiro, have shown that while haemoglobin appeared independently in several species, it actually descends from a single gene transmitted to all by their last common ancestor.

Environment - Life Sciences - 28.12.2020
The science behind extinction
Latest Stanford Health Alerts on COVID-19 COVID-19 Info for Stanford Earth Losing species Image credit: Shutterstock A collection of research and insights from Stanford experts who are deciphering the mysteries and mechanisms of extinction and survival in Earth's deep past and painting an increasingly detailed picture of life now at the brink.

Physics - 28.12.2020
Fermilab and partners achieve sustained, high-fidelity quantum teleportation
A viable quantum internet-a network in which information stored in qubits is shared over long distances through entanglement-would transform the fields of data storage, precision sensing and computing, ushering in a new era of communication. This month, scientists at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory-a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory affiliated with the University of Chicago-along with partners at five institutions took a significant step in the direction of realizing a quantum internet.

Transport - Environment - 27.12.2020
ARAS test aircraft successfully completes maiden flight
ARAS test aircraft successfully completes maiden flight
Students of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Stuttgart have developed and built the unmanned testing platform Aircraft for Research and Applied Science (ARAS). In the process, they designed the components for it to be able to withstand high loads. After the mechanical and electronic integration was finished, the "UAStudents Gruppe" (a compound made up of Unmanned Aerial System, another word for drone, and students) carried out extensive ground testing before the aircraft successfully took off for the first time in October.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 24.12.2020
Ripples in space-time could provide clues to missing components of the universe
UChicago scientist lays out how LIGO gravitational waves could be scrambled, yielding information There's something a little off about our theory of the universe. Almost everything fits, but there's a fly in the cosmic ointment, a particle of sand in the infinite sandwich. Some scientists think the culprit might be gravity-and that subtle ripples in the fabric of space-time could help us find the missing piece.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.12.2020
New research highlights the importance of the thymus in successful pregnancies
How the immune system adapts to pregnancies has puzzled scientists for decades. Now, findings from an international group of researchers, led by experts at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, reveal important changes that occur in the thymus to prevent miscarriages and gestational diabetes. The thymus is a central organ of the immune system where specialised immune cells called T lymphocytes mature.

Life Sciences - 23.12.2020
The first endovascular technology that can explore capillaries
The first endovascular technology that can explore capillaries
Scientists have invented a technique to navigate electronic devices that are smaller than human hair inside blood vessels and reach arterioles. The next step will be conducting in vivo tests. The cardiovascular system is astonishing. It uses the blood that circulates in our veins and arteries to transport oxygen and nutrients to every tissue in the body.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 23.12.2020
Genetic Engineering without Unwanted Side-Effects Helps Fight Parasites
Genetic Engineering without Unwanted Side-Effects Helps Fight Parasites
Modified CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing scissors are enabling researchers at UZH to make alterations to the genetic material of single-cell organisms that are indistinguishable from natural mutations. This method is making it possible to develop a (harmless) experimental live vaccine for the widespread parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

Social Sciences - Career - 23.12.2020
Investing in a frontline response to elder abuse
University of Queensland researchers are working with a team of 50 social workers across south east Queensland to create a uniform, national approach to identifying abuse in elderly people who present to hospitals. Latest national figures say up to 14 per cent of Australians over the age of 55 experience some form of physical, financial or emotional abuse at the hands of their carers or family members.

Life Sciences - 23.12.2020
Study estimates 200-plus white sharks breed each year
Study estimates 200-plus white sharks breed each year
A study on the vulnerable white shark has shown that approximately 206 to 252 sharks breed on Australia's east coast each year. The joint study involving The University of Queensland, NSW Department of Primary Industries and Stellenbosch University in South Africa has used genomics to estimate the yearly number of "effective breeders" in the white shark population.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 23.12.2020
Ancient DNA shines light on Caribbean prehistory
Ancient DNA shines light on Caribbean prehistory
An international team of scientists reveals the genetic makeup of the people who lived in the Caribbean between about 400 and 3,100 years ago-at once settling several archaeologic and anthropologic debates, illuminating present-day ancestries and reaching startling conclusions about Indigenous population sizes when Caribbean cultures were devastated by European colonialism beginning in the 1490s.

Life Sciences - Materials Science - 23.12.2020
Scientists pioneer new method of measuring electricity in cells
Electricity is a key ingredient in living bodies. We know that voltage differences are important in biological systems; they drive the beating of the heart and allow neurons to communicate with one another. But for decades, it wasn't possible to measure voltage differences between organelles-the membrane-wrapped structures inside the cell-and the rest of the cell.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 23.12.2020
Love and Hate in the Mouse Brain
Mounting behavior, that awkward thrusting motion dogs sometimes do against your leg, is usually associated with sexual arousal in animals, but this is not always the case. New research by Caltech neuroscientists that explores the motivations behind mounting behavior in mice finds that sometimes there is a thin line between love and hate (or anger) in the mouse brain.

Criminology / Forensics - Administration - 22.12.2020
Stress Levels of Police Officers on Patrols
Stress Levels of Police Officers on Patrols
In the first few months of the corona pandemic, street patrol officers responded to new demands with a "medium stress level" although the individual experience of strain varied greatly. For example, factors leading to a high stress level were little work experience in the police force or feeling unprepared.
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