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Results 21 - 40 of 3085.


Earth Sciences - Physics - 17.09.2020
Detaching and uplifting, not bulldozing
Detaching and uplifting, not bulldozing
Researchers have used a computer model to test a new hypothesis about the formation of the Alps while simulating seismic activity in Switzerland. This will help improve current earthquake risk models. For a long time, geoscientists have assumed that the Alps were formed when the Adriatic plate from the south collided with the Eurasian plate in the north.

Health - Psychology - 17.09.2020
Analysis: Post-traumatic stress disorder linked to increased risk of dementia
Dr Vasiliki Orgeta (UCL Psychiatry) shares new research which shows that PTSD is a risk factor for developing dementia. Dementia is one of the greatest global health challenges. As the world's population continues to age and to live longer, the number of people affected by dementia is expected to rise to 130 million by 2050.

Psychology - Pedagogy - 17.09.2020
Housing wealth matters for children’s mental health
Children growing up in families with expensive homes have fewer emotional and behavioural problems, finds new research led by the UCL Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS) based at the UCL Social Research Institute. The study, published today in Child Development, is one of the first to look at the links between family wealth and children's development.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 17.09.2020
Child neglect linked to teen pregnancy
Children who experience neglect are seven times more likely than other abuse victims to have a teen pregnancy say University of Queensland researchers. A study of the long-term impact of child abuse and neglect found that neglect was one of the most severe types of maltreatment when compared to emotional, sexual and physical abuse.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.09.2020
Engineers seek to mimic properties of the human body
Engineers seek to mimic properties of the human body
Tissue engineering experts say future biomaterials will need to mimic the human body's “stretch and squidge? properties. Findings from University of Queensland Professor Justin Cooper-White and international colleagues have been published in the prestigious journal Nature. “The characters in some old TV programs looked like normal people on the outside - and similarly we know future biomaterials will need to have almost-identical properties to those of all of the tissues in the human body,' Professor Cooper-White said.

Environment - Paleontology - 16.09.2020
Discovery of a new mass extinction
Discovery of a new mass extinction
Summary of major extinction events through time, highlighting the new, Carnian Pluvial Episode at 233 million years ago. © D. Bonadonna/ MUSE, Trento. 16 September 2020 It's not often a new mass extinction is identified; after all, such events were so devastating they really stand out in the fossil record.

Materials Science - Life Sciences - 16.09.2020
Anti-reflective coating inspired by fly eyes
Anti-reflective coating inspired by fly eyes
A team from the University of Geneva has artificially reproduced a nanoscale coating on different types of surfaces that usually covers the eyes of fruit flies, and which provides anti-reflective, anti-adhesive properties. The eyes of many insects, including the fruit fly, are covered by a thin and transparent coating made up of tiny protuberances with anti-reflective, anti-adhesive properties.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.09.2020
Next-gen organoids grow and function like real tissues
Bioengineers at EPFL have created miniature intestines in a dish that match up anatomically and functionally to the real thing better than any other lab-grown tissue models. The biological complexity and longevity of the new organoid technology is an important step towards enabling drug testing, personalized medicine, and perhaps, one day, transplantations.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 16.09.2020
World's largest ever DNA sequencing of Viking skeletons reveals they weren't all Scandinavian
World’s largest ever DNA sequencing of Viking skeletons reveals they weren’t all Scandinavian
Invaders, pirates, warriors - the history books taught us that Vikings were brutal predators who travelled by sea from Scandinavia to pillage and raid their way across Europe and beyond. The results change the perception of who a Viking actually was.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.09.2020
Team pinpoints brain circuitry underlying dissociative experiences
Stanford scientists identified key brain circuitry that plays a role in the mysterious experience called dissociation, in which people can feel disconnected from their own body and from reality. It's neither uncommon nor especially worrisome for people to lose themselves in a great book or a daydream.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 16.09.2020
Most landslides in western Oregon triggered by heavy rainfall, not big earthquakes
Most landslides in western Oregon triggered by heavy rainfall, not big earthquakes
Researchers at the University of Washington, Portland State University and the University of Oregon have shown that deep-seated landslides in the central Oregon Coast Range are triggered mostly by rainfall, not by large offshore earthquakes. The open-access paper was published Sept. 16 in Science Advances.

Health - 16.09.2020
9/11 can teach us how to support those bereaved during COVID-19, researchers find
Researchers from a leading end-of-life charity have looked to 9/11 and other mass death events for approaches to support people bereaved through COVID-19. The team from the Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Centre in Cardiff and the University of Bristol, led by Dr Emily Harrop with senior authors Professor Anthony Byrne and Dr Lucy Selman, conducted a rapid review looking at which approaches were most effective in times of mass bereavement.

Health - 16.09.2020
High levels of a growth factor increases risk for several cancers
A study of almost 400,000 British participants has identified a new link between raised levels of the growth factor IGF-1 and increased thyroid cancer risk and has confirmed associations with breast, prostate and colorectal cancer.  This could lead to new preventative strategies, including diet and lifestyle interventions.

Health - Psychology - 16.09.2020
PTSD may double risk of dementia
People who have experienced post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are up to twice as likely to develop dementia later in life, according to a new study by UCL researchers. The research, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry , is the first meta-analysis of global evidence on PTSD and dementia risk.

Environment - Life Sciences - 16.09.2020
Marine animals live where ocean is most 'breathable,' but ranges could shrink with climate change
Marine animals live where ocean is most ’breathable,’ but ranges could shrink with climate change
As oceans warm due to climate change, scientists are trying to predict how marine animals - from backboned fish to spineless jellyfish - will react. Laboratory experiments indicate that many could theoretically tolerate temperatures far higher than what they encounter today. But these studies don't mean that marine animals can maintain their current ranges in warmer oceans, according to Curtis Deutsch , an associate professor of oceanography at the University of Washington.

Life Sciences - 16.09.2020
Slower growing chickens experience higher welfare, commercial scale study finds
Slower growing chickens experience higher welfare, commercial scale study finds
Slower growing broiler chickens are healthier and have more fun than conventional breeds of birds, new evidence from an independent commercial scale farm trial has shown. The study carried out by researchers from FAI Farms, the University of Bristol and The Norwegian University of Life Sciences, is published today [16 September], in Scientific Reports.

Life Sciences - 16.09.2020
Reprogramming Brain Cells Enables Flexible Decision-Making
Reprogramming Brain Cells Enables Flexible Decision-Making
Humans, like other animals, have the ability to constantly adapt to new situations. Researchers at the Brain Research Institute of the University of Zurich have utilized a mouse model to reveal which neurons in the brain are in command in guiding adaptive behavior. Their new study contributes to our understanding of decision-making processes in healthy and infirm people.

Campus - 16.09.2020
How to train a machine to see 3D in the dark
How to train a machine to see 3D in the dark
Researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have developed a new way to create an almost perfect hologram in near darkness. Optical holograms are a clever way of producing a 3D image of an object. They have a number of uses - from protecting our ID cards from forgery, to real-time imaging of living cells.

Health - 15.09.2020
New blood test finds undetected COVID-19 cases
New blood test finds undetected COVID-19 cases
Researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have developed a new blood test capturing previous exposure to COVID-19. Initial results suggest many more people have been exposed to the virus in Australia than have been detected so far.  "We screened 3,000 blood samples provided by healthy people around Australia for antibodies to the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2," Associate Professor Ian Cockburn said, who co-led the research with Professor Elizabeth Gardiner.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.09.2020
COVID-19 Virus Uses Heparan Sulfate to Get Inside Cells
Discovery opens new possibilities for treating COVID-19 by disrupting virus' ability to bind the carbohydrate, potentially by using a repurposed drug A molecule known as ACE2 sits like a doorknob on the outer surfaces of the cells that line the lungs. Since January 2020, researchers have known that SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, primarily uses ACE2 to enter these cells and establish respiratory infections.

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