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Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 22.12.2020
How Nearby Galaxies Form Their Stars
How Nearby Galaxies Form Their Stars
How stars form in galaxies remains a major open question in astrophysics. A new UZH study sheds new light on this topic with the help of a data-driven re-analysis of observational measurements. The star-formation activity of typical, nearby galaxies is found to scale proportionally with the amount of gas present in these galaxies.

Health - Innovation - 22.12.2020
Adaptive, automated, interactive: Graz research group develops health portal of the future
Adaptive, automated, interactive: Graz research group develops health portal of the future
Researchers from TU Graz, Med Uni Graz and Uni Graz are working on a digital interactive information system that automatically tailors medical content to individuals and their needs. Additional Images for download at the end of the text Can this digital medium make predictions about the individual information needs of users, recognize their cognitive abilities, and use this data to convey high-quality medical content in a comprehensible and clear manner?

Earth Sciences - 22.12.2020
Slow start of plate tectonics despite a hot early Earth
Slow start of plate tectonics despite a hot early Earth
Writing in PNAS, scientists from Cologne university present important new constraints showing that plate tectonics started relatively slow, although the early Earth's interior was much hotter than today. In an international collaboration earth scientists at the University of Cologne discovered that during Earth's early history mantle convection on, i.e. the internal mixing of our planet, was surprisingly slow and spatially restricted.

Materials Science - 22.12.2020
50 years old and as good as new
50 years old and as good as new
Since 1970 a worldwide unique test has been running in the Empa testing hall in Dübendorf, in which the long-term behaviour of bonded steel reinforcements on a concrete beam is being investigated. Investigations such as these have contributed to the fact that adhesive-bonded reinforcement is now state of the art as a strengthening method and that engineers have confidence in this retrofitting method.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.12.2020
Our 10 most-read science news stories of 2020
From stars in another galaxy to a microscopic virus that has taken hold of the entire Earth: in this overview we present the most-read news items about research at KU Leuven in 2020. Bioscience engineers and economists from KU Leuven mapped out how wood could replace petroleum in the chemical industry.

Social Sciences - 22.12.2020
Junk food linked to sleep problems in teens
Eating too much junk food has been linked with poor sleep quality in teens, a University of Queensland-led study has found. UQ School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences researcher Associate Professor Asad Khan said frequent consumption of soft drinks and fast food was strongly associated with sleep disturbance in adolescents around the world.

Life Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 21.12.2020
Ten cool research stories you might have missed this year
There's been a lot going on in 2020, so nobody can be blamed for missing a few things. But amid a tumultuous year in which many pivoted to COVID-19 research , University of Chicago scholars and scientists have also been hard at work continuing to understand the planet and the universe we live in, to improve our lives, and to build a future that's clean, safe and sustainable.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 21.12.2020
Muddying the waters: rock breakdown may play less role of a role in regulating climate than previously thought
Muddying the waters: rock breakdown may play less role of a role in regulating climate than previously thought
The weathering of rocks at the Earth's surface may remove less greenhouse gases from the atmosphere than previous estimates, says new research from the University of Cambridge.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 21.12.2020
Muddying the waters: rock breakdown may play less of a role in regulating climate than previously thought
Muddying the waters: rock breakdown may play less of a role in regulating climate than previously thought
The weathering of rocks at the Earth's surface may remove less greenhouse gases from the atmosphere than previous estimates, says new research from the University of Cambridge.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2020
How our brains help us find misplaced objects
Have you ever wondered how we remember the last place we saw our car keys or other objects like mobile phones and glasses? This new research shows we have a type of brain cell that's sensitive to the distance and direction of objects, they call these Vector Trace cells. These are in addition to GPS-like brain cells, which can store maps of places we have been, like our kitchen or a holiday destination.

Health - 21.12.2020
Fear of the Coronavirus and Scepticism about Vaccination
Fear of the Coronavirus and Scepticism about Vaccination
Although the individual risk of becoming infected with the coronavirus and falling ill with COVID-19 is currently estimated as being higher than was the case in summer, the willingness to be vaccinated is still not particularly great. In mid-2020, just under 55 percent of the respondents of a representative survey stated that they would probably, or very probably, be vaccinated.

Health - 21.12.2020
Sixfold increase in risk
Sixfold increase in risk
Study shows link between cervical cancer and HIV infection A research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has quantified the effects of an infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) on the development of cervical cancer. Their results show that the risk of developing cervical cancer is six times higher in women who are infected with HIV.

Physics - Chemistry - 21.12.2020
The Mechanics of the Immune System
The Mechanics of the Immune System
When T-cells of our immune system become active, tiny traction forces at the molecular level play an important role. They have now been studied at TU Wien. Highly complicated processes constantly take place in our body to keep pathogens in check: The T-cells of our immune system are busy searching for antigens - suspicious molecules that fit exactly into certain receptors of the T-cells like a key into a lock.

Health - Psychology - 21.12.2020
One in three adults drank more alcohol during first lockdown
One in three adults drank more alcohol during first lockdown
COVID-19 and lockdown measures drove some individuals more than others to use alcohol to cope with stress, a new study has revealed. While overall alcohol consumption appeared to fall, a study published in  BMJ Open  found that more than one in three adults (36%) increased their consumption during the first lockdown.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.12.2020
Large study in UK NHS labs shows gold-standard accuracy of Oxford Nanopore's COVID-19 test LamPORE for both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients
Large study in UK NHS labs shows gold-standard accuracy of Oxford Nanopore’s COVID-19 test LamPORE for both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients
A study of more than 23,000 samples carried out by teams across the UK shows Oxford Nanopore's COVID-19 test, LamPORE, is highly accurate for the detection of SARS-CoV-2, in both symptomatic and asymptomatic population settings. The study was performed on both swab and saliva samples across four NHS sites, showing very high LamPORE test accuracy, as follows: These data support the use of LamPORE for testing of both symptomatic people, and those without symptoms.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2020
How a large protein complex assembles in a cell
How a large protein complex assembles in a cell
A team of ETH researchers led by Karsten Weis has developed a method that allows them to study the assembly process for large protein complexes in detail for the first time. As their case study, the biologists chose one of the largest cellular complexes: the nuclear pore complex in yeast cells. Cells produce a great number of different protein complexes, each of which is made up of many individual proteins.

Physics - 21.12.2020
When light and atoms share a common vibe
Scientists from EPFL, MIT, and CEA Saclay demonstrate a state of vibration that exists simultaneously at two different times. They evidence this quantum superposition by measuring the strongest class of quantum correlations between light beams that interact with the vibration. An especially counter-intuitive feature of quantum mechanics is that a single event can exist in a state of superposition - happening bothhere andthere , or bothtoday andtomorrow .

Health - Life Sciences - 21.12.2020
New blood-test device monitors blood chemistry continually
New blood-test device monitors blood chemistry continually
The new device can continuously sense levels of virtually any protein or molecule in the blood. The researchers say it could be transformative for disease detection, patient monitoring and biomedical research. For even the most routine of medical checkups, a blood test is often the first order of business.

Physics - Chemistry - 21.12.2020
Speeding Toward Improved Hydrogen Fuel Production
Speeding Toward Improved Hydrogen Fuel Production
A new nanomaterial helps obtain hydrogen from a liquid energy carrier, in a key step toward a stable and clean fuel source Hydrogen is a sustainable source of clean energy that avoids toxic emissions and can add value to multiple sectors in the economy including transportation, power generation, metals manufacturing, among others.

Astronomy / Space Science - 21.12.2020
TESS dates an ancient collision with our galaxy
TESS dates an ancient collision with our galaxy
A single bright star in the constellation of Indus, visible from the southern hemisphere, has revealed new insights on an ancient collision that our galaxy the Milky Way underwent with another smaller galaxy called Gaia-Enceladus early in its history. An international team of scientists led by the University of Birmingham adopted the novel approach of applying the forensic characterisation of a single ancient, bright star called ν Indi as a probe of the history of the Milky Way.

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