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Results 41 - 60 of 246.


Pharmacology - 20.01.2020
Confirms lingering mood benefit of psychedelics
People who had recently used psychedelics such as psilocybin report a sustained improvement in mood and feeling closer to others after the high has worn off, shows a new Yale study published the week of Jan. 20 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The results of a field study of more than 1,200 people attending multi-day arts and music festivals in the United States and United Kingdom confirm previous laboratory research indicating that psychedelic substances enhance feelings of social connectedness and improve mental well-being, the authors say.

Health - Pharmacology - 20.01.2020
Refining Breast Cancer Classification by Multiplexed Imaging
Refining Breast Cancer Classification by Multiplexed Imaging
An imaging approach developed at UZH enables the study of breast cancer tissue in greater detail. It uses 35 biomarkers to identify the different cell types in breast tumors and its surrounding area compared to the current standard of testing single markers. This increases the precision of tumor analysis and classification - and improves personalized diagnostics for breast cancer patients.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.01.2020
Sepsis associated with 1 in 5 deaths
Sepsis associated with 1 in 5 deaths
Twice as many people as previously believed are dying of sepsis worldwide, according to an analysis published in The Lancet . Among them are a disproportionately high number of children in poor areas. Led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and University of Washington schools of medicine, the study revealed 48.9 million global cases of sepsis in 2017 and 11 million deaths, representing 1 in 5 deaths worldwide.

Environment - 20.01.2020
Confirms the Importance of Tiger Population in Thailand Forest Complex
A new scientific survey has reinforced the importance of one of the world's only remaining breeding populations of Indochinese tigers and provided evidence of tiger cubs in eastern Thailand's Dong Phayayen-Khao Yai Forest Complex. The study by researchers from the Department of Zoology's WildCRU , published in  Biological Conservation , discusses findings first announced in 2017 that the Dong Phayayen-Khao Yai Forest Complex supports a critically important breeding population of tigers.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 20.01.2020
The salt of the comet
The salt of the comet
Under the leadership of astrophysicist Kathrin Altwegg, Bernese researchers have found an explanation for why very little nitrogen could previously be accounted for in the nebulous covering of comets: the building block for life predominantly occurs in the form of ammonium salts, the occurrence of which could not previously be measured.

Health - Pharmacology - 20.01.2020
Discovery of new T-cell raises prospect of 'universal' cancer therapy
Discovery of new T-cell raises prospect of ’universal’ cancer therapy
Researchers at Cardiff University have discovered a new type of killer T-cell that offers hope of a “one-size-fits-all” cancer therapy. T-cell therapies for cancer - where immune cells are removed, modified and returned to the patient's blood to seek and destroy cancer cells - are the latest paradigm in cancer treatments.

Astronomy / Space Science - 20.01.2020
Astronomers use 'cosmic echo-location' to map black hole surroundings
Astronomers use ’cosmic echo-location’ to map black hole surroundings
For Cambridge students For our researchers Business and enterprise Colleges and Departments Email and phone search Give to Cambridge Museums and collections Undergraduate Events and open days Fees and finance Postgraduate Postgraduate courses Fees and funding Frequently asked questions International students Continuing education Executive and professional education Courses in education How the University and Colleges work Visiting the University

Astronomy / Space Science - 20.01.2020
XMM-Newton uses light echoes to map dynamic black hole
XMM-Newton uses light echoes to map dynamic black hole
Material falling into a black hole throws X-rays out into space - and now, for the first time, the European Space Agency's (ESA) XMM-Newton X-ray observatory has used the reverberating echoes of this light to map the dynamic behaviour and surroundings of a black hole itself. Although most black holes are too small on the sky for us to resolve their immediate surroundings, we can explore these mysterious objects by watching how matter behaves as it nears, and falls into, them.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 20.01.2020
A chronicle of giant straight-tusked elephants
A chronicle of giant straight-tusked elephants
About 800,000 years ago, the giant straight-tusked elephant Palaeoloxodon migrated out of Africa and became widespread across Europe and Asia. It divided into many species, with distinct types in Japan, Central Asia and Europe — even some dwarf forms as large as a small donkey on some Mediterranean islands.

Social Sciences - 20.01.2020
Clubs and bars must support women by cracking down on sexual aggression
Nightclubs and bars must create a supportive environment that cracks down on unwanted sexual attention and allows women to enjoy their nights out, according to a new study. Increasing numbers of women are prepared to speak back to sexual harassment whilst enjoying a night out with female friends by confronting the men responsible and telling them clearly and robustly that their behaviour is unacceptable.

Environment - 20.01.2020
Brazilian wildfire pollution worsens air quality in distant cities - study
Wildfires in south eastern Brazil produce airborne pollution that worsens air quality in major cities such as Sao Paulo - cancelling out efforts to improve the urban environment and posing health risks to citizens, according to a new study. The planet is frequently affected by smoke from fires caused by humans and natural processes.

Health - Pharmacology - 20.01.2020
Blood test for eight gene signatures could predict onset of tuberculosis
Scientists at UCL have shown a blood test could predict the onset of tuberculosis three to six months before people become unwell, a finding which could help better target antibiotics and save countless lives. In the study, published in  The Lancet Respiratory Medicine , researchers sought to identify which, if any, gene expression signatures in blood could be used to predict the disease at a very early stage and before symptoms arise.

Pharmacology - Health - 20.01.2020
Prolonged breath-holding could help radiotherapy treatment of cardiac arrhythmias
A technique that enables patients suffering from heart conditions to hold their breath safely for over 5 minutes could have potential as part of a new treatment for cardiac arrhythmias, say researchers at the University of Birmingham. In a new study, published in Frontiers in Physiology, researchers initially proposed the technique as a new means for earlier diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease.

Pharmacology - Social Sciences - 20.01.2020
Racial disparities in drug prescriptions for dementia
Disparities in drug prescribing suggest that black and Asian people with dementia are not receiving the same quality of care as their white peers, according to a new UCL-led study in the UK. Asian people with dementia are less likely to receive anti-dementia drugs, and take them for shorter periods, according to the findings published in Clinical Epidemiology .

Physics - Chemistry - 20.01.2020
Platelets instead of spheres make screens more economical
Platelets instead of spheres make screens more economical
ETH scientists have further developed QLED technology for screens. They have produced light sources that for the first time emit high-intensity light in only one direction. This reduces scattering losses, which makes the technology extremely energy efficient. QLED screens have been on the market for a few years now.

Physics - Materials Science - 20.01.2020
Record-breaking Terahertz Laser Beam
Record-breaking Terahertz Laser Beam
A new, extremely efficient source of terahertz radiation has been developed at TU Wien (Vienna): Lasers turn air into plasma, thereby producing terahertz rays for many possible applications. Terahertz radiation is used for security checks at airports, for medical examinations and also for quality checks in industry.

Health - 20.01.2020
Premature menopause increases risk of chronic health issues
Women who experience premature menopause are significantly more likely to develop multiple chronic conditions, according to a new study by The University of Queensland. School of Public Health PhD student Dr Xiaolin Xu analysed data on more than 11 thousand women aged 45 to 50 in 1996 and tracked them until 2016, as part of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.01.2020
Local water availability is permanently reduced after planting forests
Local water availability is permanently reduced after planting forests
For Cambridge students For our researchers Business and enterprise Colleges and Departments Email and phone search Give to Cambridge Museums and collections Undergraduate Events and open days Fees and finance Postgraduate Postgraduate courses Fees and funding Frequently asked questions International students Continuing education Executive and professional education Courses in education How the University and Colleges work Visiting the University

Pedagogy - 20.01.2020
Becoming less active and gaining weight: downsides of becoming an adult
Becoming less active and gaining weight: downsides of becoming an adult
For Cambridge students For our researchers Business and enterprise Colleges and Departments Email and phone search Give to Cambridge Museums and collections Undergraduate Events and open days Fees and finance Postgraduate Postgraduate courses Fees and funding Frequently asked questions International students Continuing education Executive and professional education Courses in education How the University and Colleges work Visiting the University

Earth Sciences - Palaeontology - 17.01.2020
Dinosaurs died because of an asteroid impact
Dinosaurs died because of an asteroid impact
Researchers disprove theory of volcanic eruption as reason for mass deaths / Mineralogists and planetologists of the University of Münster participating in worldwide study in "Science' Was it volcanic eruptions in western India or an asteroid impact that caused the death of dinosaurs and many other animal species 66 million years ago? Researchers have been discussing this since the 1980s.

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