news 2020


Category


Years
2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008


Results 41 - 60 of 2260.


Health - Pharmacology - 08.07.2020
Yale, Baylor create atlas of cellular change in lungs with fibrosis
Yale, Baylor create atlas of cellular change in lungs with fibrosis
A research team from Yale and Baylor College of Medicine has completed the largest single-cell analysis to date of lungs affected by Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF), revealing how cells change in response to the disease and identifying previously unknown cell types. The findings, published in the July 8 issue of Science Advances , deepen understanding of IPF and could improve treatment of it and other fibrotic lung diseases.

Pharmacology - 08.07.2020
Helping drug-delivering particles squeeze through a syringe
Helping drug-delivering particles squeeze through a syringe
MIT engineers are using computing modeling to prevent microparticles from clogging during injections. Microparticles offer a promising way to deliver multiple doses of a drug or vaccine at once, because they can be designed to release their payload at specific intervals. However, the particles, which are about the size of a grain of sand, can be difficult to inject because they can get clogged in a typical syringe.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.07.2020
Deconstructing glioblastoma complexity reveals its pattern of development
Study identifies rapidly dividing cancer stem cells that can respond to new therapies Brain cancers have long been thought of as being resistant to treatments because of the presence of multiple types of cancer cells within each tumor. A new study uncovers a cancer cell hierarchy that originates from a single cancer cell type, which can be targeted to slow cancer growth.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.07.2020
Delirium, rare brain inflammation and stroke linked to Covid-19
Neurological complications of Covid-19 can include delirium, brain inflammation, stroke and nerve damage, finds a new UCL and UCLH-led study. Published in the journal Brain , the research team identified one rare and sometimes fatal inflammatory condition, known as ADEM, which appears to be increasing in prevalence due to the pandemic.

Health - Social Sciences - 08.07.2020
Coronavirus disproportionately harms U.S. prison population
People incarcerated in U.S. prisons tested positive for COVID-19 at a rate 5.5 times higher than the general public, according to a new paper co-authored by the UCLA COVID-19 Behind Bars Data Project and researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In their report , which was published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the researchers also found that the death rate of U.S. prisoners was 39 per 100,000 people, higher than the U.S. population rate of 29 deaths per 100,000.

Physics - Electroengineering - 08.07.2020
Scaling up the quantum chip
Scaling up the quantum chip
MIT engineers develop a hybrid process that connects photonics with "artificial atoms," to produce the largest quantum chip of its type. MIT researchers have developed a process to manufacture and integrate "artificial atoms," created by atomic-scale defects in microscopically thin slices of diamond, with photonic circuitry, producing the largest quantum chip of its type.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.07.2020
Analysis: How studying fruit flies might help us prevent age-related hearing loss in humans
Scientists at UCL have discovered sets of regulatory genes in fruit flies, which are responsible for maintaining healthy hearing. Professor Joerg Albert (UCL Ear Institute) explains how the findings could potentially lead to treatments for age-related hearing loss in humans. Hearing loss is a common age-related ailment, affecting nearly one in every three people over the age of 65.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.07.2020
Increase in delirium, rare brain inflammation and stroke linked to Covid-19
Neurological complications of Covid-19 can include delirium, brain inflammation, stroke and nerve damage, finds a new UCL and UCLH-led study. Published in the journal Brain , the research team identified one rare and sometimes fatal inflammatory condition, known as ADEM, which appears to be increasing in prevalence due to the pandemic.

Chemistry - Physics - 08.07.2020
Graphene: It is all about the toppings
Graphene: It is all about the toppings
To fully exploit the potential of the "wonder material" graphene, it has to be combined with other materials. A new study investigates what is important for this. Graphene consists of a single layer of carbon atoms. Exceptional electronic, thermal, mechanical and optical properties have made graphene one of the most studied materials at the moment.

Physics - Materials Science - 08.07.2020
Scientists Dive Deep Into Hidden World of Quantum States
Scientists Dive Deep Into Hidden World of Quantum States
New technique developed by scientists at Berkeley Lab, UC Berkeley could help find silicon's successor in race against Moore's Law A research team led by the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has developed a technique that could lead to new electronic materials that surpass the limitations imposed by Moore's Law, which predicted in 1975 that the number of transistors packed into a tiny silicon-based computer chip would double every two years.

Physics - Chemistry - 08.07.2020
Porous nitrogen-doped graphene ribbons for future electronics
Porous nitrogen-doped graphene ribbons for future electronics
A team of physicists and chemists has produced the first porous graphene ribbons in which specific carbon atoms in the crystal lattice are replaced with nitrogen atoms. These ribbons have semiconducting properties that make them attractive for applications in electronics and quantum computing, as reported by researchers from the Universities of Basel, Bern, Lancaster and Warwick in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Life Sciences - 08.07.2020
Women’s egg quality dependent on metabolic factors
Increasing the levels of a chemical found in all human cells could boost a woman's fertility and help select the best eggs for IVF, according to University of Queensland research. In the world's most in-depth study of the final steps of egg maturation, the quality of a woman's eggs was found to be significantly dependent on the important metabolic coenzyme called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+).

Life Sciences - Health - 08.07.2020
The IRB discovers the activation mechanism of the "police patrol" cells of our immune system
Nearly 200 billion na´ve T cells continuously patrol the human body in a dormant state, prepared to respond to potential threats. An international group of researchers, led by Dr. Roger Geiger of the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB, affiliated to USI), demonstrated how these cells sustain a constant state of preparedness.

Health - 07.07.2020
Stress and finances worse off during pandemic
Stress and finances worse off during pandemic
Almost one in two Australians, 47 per cent, say they are more stressed because of the COVID-19 crisis, according to new data from The Australian National University (ANU). The findings also show three in 10 Australians say their finances have worsened during the pandemic. The report is based on a survey of over 3,200 Australians and led by the ANU Centre for Social Research and Methods.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 07.07.2020
Enzymes as double agents: new mechanism discovered in protein modification
Enzymes as double agents: new mechanism discovered in protein modification
Proteins are the workers in a cell and, as the “basic element of life”, are responsible for the most widely varying metabolic processes. In plants, for example, they take on an important function in photosynthesis. In order to be able to work purposefully, proteins change their chemical form after they have been produced in a cell - for example, through protein acetylation, when an acetyl group is transferred to the protein.

Materials Science - 07.07.2020
Shock-dissipating fractal cubes could forge high-tech armor
Shock-dissipating fractal cubes could forge high-tech armor
Additively manufactured fractal structures with closely spaced voids dissipate shockwaves five times better than solid cubes LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 7, 2020-Tiny, 3D printed cubes of plastic, with intricate fractal voids built into them, have proven to be effective at dissipating shockwaves, potentially leading to new types of lightweight armor and structural materials effective against explosions and impacts.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 07.07.2020
Keep calm and carry on cooking: Norman Conquest of 1066 did little to change people's eating habits
Keep calm and carry on cooking: Norman Conquest of 1066 did little to change people’s eating habits
Archaeologists from Cardiff University and the University of Sheffield have combined the latest scientific methods to offer new insights into life during the Norman Conquest of England. Until now, the story of the Conquest has primarily been told from evidence of the elite classes of the time. But little has been known about how it affected everyday people's lives.

Physics - 07.07.2020
Portable system boosts laser precision, at room temperature
Portable system boosts laser precision, at room temperature
"Light squeezer" reduces quantum noise in lasers, could enhance quantum computing and gravitational-wave detection. Physicists at MIT have designed a quantum "light squeezer" that reduces quantum noise in an incoming laser beam by 15 percent. It is the first system of its kind to work at room temperature, making it amenable to a compact, portable setup that may be added to high-precision experiments to improve laser measurements where quantum noise is a limiting factor.

Psychology - 07.07.2020
Psychologists pinpoint psychological factors of refugee integration
Due to border closures in the wake of the corona crisis, the arrival of refugees in Europe has temporarily dipped. However, worldwide numbers of refugees have surged, again, within a year, driven by violence, war, persecution, economic hardship, or climate change. In the foreseeable future, many refugees will not be able to return to their homes.

Social Sciences - 07.07.2020
Talking with parents empowers Latino youths to engage in community
Share on: Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn When Latino youths lend their voices to political causes-from immigration policies that have separated families to recent Black Lives Matter protests-their resilience originates from home. A new University of Michigan study suggests that when Latino youths have conversations surrounding their ethnic heritage and history at home, they also tend to discuss contemporary political issues.

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |