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Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 30.03.2020
High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory tests speed of light
High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory tests speed of light
Ultra-high energy gamma rays from the far reaches of the galaxy provide powerful proof that the predictions of relativity, including the constant speed of light, hold to the highest energy extremes yet probed LOS ALAMOS, N.M., March 30, 2020-New measurements confirm, to the highest energies yet explored, that the laws of physics hold no matter where you are or how fast you're moving.

Health - Pharmacology - 30.03.2020
"Living drug factories" might treat diabetes and other diseases
Chemical engineers have developed a way to protect transplanted drug-producing cells from immune system rejection. One promising way to treat diabetes is with transplanted islet cells that produce insulin when blood sugar levels get too low. However, patients who receive such transplants must take drugs to prevent their immune systems from rejecting the transplanted cells, so the treatment is not often used.

Psychology - 30.03.2020
Growing gap in children's socio-emotional skills
Growing gap in children’s socio-emotional skills
The gap between children with the highest and lowest socio-emotional skills has increased over the past three decades, and the socio-economic status of mothers is a significant contributing factor, according to a new UCL study. The study, published in the Journal of Public Economics , compares the socio-emotional skills of two cohorts of children born in England 30 years apart, and shows for the first time that inequality in these early skills has increased.

Health - Chemistry - 30.03.2020
Engineers 3D print soft, rubbery brain implants
Engineers 3D print soft, rubbery brain implants
The brain is one of our most vulnerable organs, as soft as the softest tofu. Brain implants, on the other hand, are typically made from metal and other rigid materials that over time can cause inflammation and the buildup of scar tissue. MIT engineers are working on developing soft, flexible neural implants that can gently conform to the brain's contours and monitor activity over longer periods, without aggravating surrounding tissue.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.03.2020
How the novel coronavirus binds to human cells
Coronaviruses infect humans by binding to specific proteins, known as receptors, on human cell surfaces. Researchers from the University of Minnesota, led by Professor Fang Li in the Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences at the College of Veterinary Medicine , recently broke new ground in understanding how SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, binds to its human receptor.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.03.2020
Key-and vulnerable-features of novel coronavirus
The novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, is closely related to the SARS virus that caused devastation in 2002-03. A University of Minnesota team, led by researcher Fang Li, studied how mutations that changed the structure of a SARS-CoV-2 protein enabled it to attach more securely to human cells than its predecessor, infect human cells better, and spread faster.

Pharmacology - Health - 30.03.2020
The placebo effect and psychedelic drugs: tripping on nothing?
There has been a lot of recent interest in the use of psychedelic drugs to treat depression. A new study from McGill suggests that, in the right context, some people may experience psychedelic-like effects from placebos alone. The researchers reported some of the strongest placebo effects (these are effects from "fake" medication) on consciousness in the literature relating to psychedelic drugs.

Physics - 27.03.2020
Quantum leap for photon entanglement could revolutionise secure communications
A breakthrough in the development of quantum-enhanced optical systems could pave the way for advances in encryption, communication and measurement, scientists say. In a new paper published today in the journal Science Advances, a group of researchers, led by Matteo Clerici at the University of Glasgow's James Watt School of Engineering and colleagues from the UK, Japan and Germany, demonstrates a new method of generating and detecting quantum-entangled photons at a wavelength of 2.1 micrometres.

Physics - Electroengineering - 27.03.2020
Energy-harvesting design aims to turn Wi-Fi signals into usable power
Energy-harvesting design aims to turn Wi-Fi signals into usable power
Device for harnessing terahertz radiation might enable self-powering implants, cellphones, other portable electronics. Any device that sends out a Wi-Fi signal also emits terahertz waves -electromagnetic waves with a frequency somewhere between microwaves and infrared light. These high-frequency radiation waves, known as "T-rays," are also produced by almost anything that registers a temperature, including our own bodies and the inanimate objects around us.

Health - Social Sciences - 27.03.2020
What the Ebola outbreak could teach us about how to contain the novel coronavirus
A new research paper examining the 2014-15 Ebola outbreak in Africa could hold crucial insights for policymakers grappling with the novel coronavirus pandemic — namely, the importance of public engagement and trust during health crises. The study (PDF), co-authored by Darin Christensen, assistant professor of public policy in the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, shows that where people lack confidence in their health providers, they are less likely to seek testing and treatment when they feel sick.

Health - Pharmacology - 27.03.2020
Oxford COVID-19 vaccine programme opens for clinical trial recruitment
Oxford COVID-19 vaccine programme opens for clinical trial recruitment
University of Oxford researchers working in an unprecedented vaccine development effort to prevent COVID-19 have started screening healthy volunteers (aged 18-55) today for their upcoming ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine trial in the Thames Valley Region. The vaccine based on an adenovirus vaccine vector and the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein is already in production but won't be ready for some weeks still.

Life Sciences - Environment - 27.03.2020
Scientists document seasonal migrations of fish across the deep-sea floor for the first time
Scientists have, for the first time, documented seasonal migrations of fish across the seafloor in deep-sea fish, revealing an important insight that will further scientific understanding of the nature of our planet. The study - published today in the Journal of Animal Ecology and led by the University of Glasgow and Nova Southeastern University in Florida - analysed over seven years of deep-sea photographic data from West Africa, linking seasonal patterns in surface-ocean productivity with observed behavioural patterns of fishes at 1500 metres.

Life Sciences - Environment - 27.03.2020
Scientists predict the size of plastics animals can eat
A team of scientists at Cardiff University has, for the first time, developed a way of predicting the size of plastics different animals are likely to ingest. The researchers, from the University's Water Research Institute, looked at the gut contents of more than 2,000 animals to create a simple equation to predict the size of a plastic item an animal can eat, based on the length of its body.

Computer Science / Telecom - 27.03.2020
Security flaw that would enable hackers to copy millions of car keys
Security flaw that would enable hackers to copy millions of car keys
A team of researchers from the COSIC research group at KU Leuven and from the University of Birmingham has discovered that a wide range of car models produced by Toyota, Kia and Hyundai use weak cryptographic keys. This makes it easy to clone the key fob transponder. It is likely that millions of cars are affected.

Health - Pharmacology - 27.03.2020
An experimental peptide could block Covid-19
An experimental peptide could block Covid-19
MIT chemists are testing a protein fragment that may inhibit coronaviruses' ability to enter human lung cells. The research described in this article has been published on a preprint server but has not yet been peer-reviewed by scientific or medical experts. In hopes of developing a possible treatment for Covid-19, a team of MIT chemists has designed a drug candidate that they believe may block coronaviruses' ability to enter human cells.

Computer Science / Telecom - Microtechnics - 27.03.2020
COVID-19 Should Be Wake-Up Call for Robotics Research
Pandemic response requires "dull, dirty, dangerous" jobs suited for robots Robots could perform some of the "dull, dirty and dangerous" jobs associated with combating the COVID-19 pandemic, but that would require many new capabilities not currently being funded or developed, an editorial Robotics argues.

Health - 27.03.2020
A device for the early detection of certain eyesight problems
A device for the early detection of certain eyesight problems
EPFL researchers have developed a device that can zoom in on previously invisible cells at the back of the eye. The technology could be extremely useful for ophthalmologists, in particular for detecting age-related macular degeneration early and assessing new treatment options. There is renewed hope for people with eyesight problems such as age-related macular degeneration, or AMD.

Health - 26.03.2020
Coronavirus pandemic could have caused 40 million deaths if left unchecked
Coronavirus pandemic could have caused 40 million deaths if left unchecked
The outbreak of COVID-19 would likely have caused 40 million deaths this year in the absence of any preventative measures. This is one of the findings of a new analysis by researchers at Imperial College London, which estimated the potential scale of the coronavirus pandemic across the globe, highlighting that failure to mitigate the impact could lead to huge loss of life.

Environment - Life Sciences - 26.03.2020
Marine species respond as oceans warm
A global analysis of over 300 marine species spanning more than 100 years, shows that mammals, plankton, fish, plants and seabirds have been changing in abundance as our climate warms. At the cool edge of species ranges marine life is doing well as warming opens up habitat that was previously inaccessible, while at the warmer edge species are declining as conditions become too warm to tolerate.

Health - 26.03.2020
Stresses the urgent need for serologic testing to help tackle the COVID-19 outbreak
Serologic tests are blood tests that look for antibodies in your blood, and would allow scientists to decipher what fraction of the British public have already had COVID-19 and recovered, and provide an improved estimate of the number remaining at risk of serious illness. The research led by Professor Sunetra Gupta and Dr Jose Lourenco from Oxford's Department of Zoology, used a well-understood and widely studied modelling approach.

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