news 2020


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Results 61 - 80 of 4184.


Environment - Life Sciences - 17.12.2020
How climate change is disrupting ecosystems
How climate change is disrupting ecosystems
When it gets warmer, organisms rise higher from the lowlands. Researchers from ETH and WSL investigated what could happen to plant communities on alpine grasslands if grasshoppers from lower elevations settled there. The world is getting warmer and warmer - and many organisms native to lower latitudes or elevations are moving higher.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science - 17.12.2020
Artificial Intelligence Classifies Supernova Explosions with Unprecedented Accuracy
Artificial Intelligence Classifies Supernova Explosions with Unprecedented Accuracy
Artificial intelligence is classifying real supernova explosions without the traditional use of spectra, thanks to a team of astronomers at the Center for Astrophysics Harvard & Smithsonian. The complete data sets and resulting classifications are publicly available for open use. By training a machine learning model to categorize supernovae based on their visible characteristics, the astronomers were able to classify real data from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey for 2,315 supernovae with an accuracy rate of 82-percent without the use of spectra.

Environment - Materials Science - 17.12.2020
How to power up battery manufacturing in India
India will need to make the switch from coal to renewable energy to meet its ambitious decarbonization goals. Batteries could be key to meeting these targets and represent an opportunity to develop the country's battery manufacturing industry. India is one of only a few countries whose national emissions reduction target is in line with the Paris Agreement's goal of reducing global warming before Earth's temperature reaches a dangerous threshold.

Health - Computer Science - 17.12.2020
AI-powered microscope could check cancer margins in minutes
AI-powered microscope could check cancer margins in minutes
Study: Deep learning microscope images thick tissues with extended depth-of-field When surgeons remove cancer, one of the first questions is, "Did they get it all?” Researchers from Rice University and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have created a new microscope that can quickly and inexpensively image large tissue sections, potentially during surgery, to find the answer.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 17.12.2020
On the hunt for a missing giant black hole
On the hunt for a missing giant black hole
The mystery surrounding the whereabouts of a supermassive black hole has deepened. Despite searching with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have no evidence that a distant black hole estimated to weigh between 3 billion and 100 billion times the mass of the sun is anywhere to be found.

Computer Science - 17.12.2020
How does immersive reality affect implicit racial bias?
In the new experiment, 92 white female participants stood in a virtual street embodied either in a white or black body, with crowds of virtual people walking by. For those who experienced the neutral or positive crowd the same results as previously found were replicated and the implicit racial bias of those in the black body decreased.

Health - Astronomy / Space Science - 17.12.2020
2020: A Year In Review
At Caltech, as throughout the rest of the world, 2020 was a year like no other. This unprecedented year was filled with personal and professional challenges as well as fast-breaking and paradigm-shifting events, all of which were framed by (and helped to shape) incredible advances and discoveries in science, engineering, and technology, realized thanks to the ingenuity, insight, and perseverance of Caltech's community of researchers and scholars, students and staff.

Pharmacology - Health - 16.12.2020
Common drug for build-up of blood following head injury worse than placebo
Common drug for build-up of blood following head injury worse than placebo
A commonly-used treatment for chronic subdural haematoma - the build-up of 'old' blood in the space between the brain and the skull, usually as a result of minor head injury - could lead to a worse outcome than receiving no medication, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. Our trial sought to determine if dexamethasone should be offered routinely to all patients with chronic subdural haematoma or if its use should be abandoned.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.12.2020
Driving force behind cellular 'protein factories' could have implications for neurodegenerative disease
Driving force behind cellular ’protein factories’ could have implications for neurodegenerative disease
Researchers have identified the driving force behind a cellular process linked to neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and motor neurone disease. There is still so much to learn about this system, which is incredibly important to fundamental biomedical science Clemens Kaminski In a study published today in Science Advances , researchers from the University of Cambridge show that tiny components within the cell are the biological engines behind effective protein production.

Physics - Electroengineering - 16.12.2020
Information transport via magnons
Information transport via magnons
Pseudospin in antiferromagnets: new perspectives for information technologies Elementary particles carry an intrinsic angular momentum known as their spin. For an electron, the spin can take only two particular values relative to a quantization axis, letting us denote them as spin-up and spin-down electrons.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.12.2020
Study highlights stark inequality in survival after cardiac surgery between paying and NHS patients
Study highlights stark inequality in survival after cardiac surgery between paying and NHS patients
A new study has revealed paying patients are 20 per cent less likely to die or develop major complications, such as reintervention or stroke, after cardiac surgery than NHS patients - findings researchers say cannot be explained by socioeconomic factors alone. The study, led by academics at the University of Bristol, looked at the data of over 280,000 patients who underwent adult cardiac surgery over a ten-year period from 2009 to 2018 at 31 NHS cardiac units in England.

Social Sciences - 16.12.2020
BAME babies at highest risk of Vitamin D deficiency, highlighting need for improvements to UK antenatal supplementation programme
BAME babies at highest risk of Vitamin D deficiency, highlighting need for improvements to UK antenatal supplementation programme
BAME babies at highest risk of Vitamin D deficiency, highlighting need for improvements to UK antenatal supplementation programme, new study suggests A third of all babies and half of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) babies are vitamin D deficient, a large study of 3000 newborn's in the West Midlands has shown, highlighting potential shortfalls in the current UK antenatal supplementation programme.

Environment - Life Sciences - 16.12.2020
New research highlights impacts of weedkiller on wildlife
New research highlights impacts of weedkiller on wildlife
Prolonged exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of the weedkiller Roundup causes significant harm to keystone species according to new research at the University of Birmingham. A team in the University's School of Biosciences used waterfleas, or Daphnia, to test the effects prolonged exposure to concentrations of Roundup deemed safe by regulatory agencies.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.12.2020
Digipredict digital twin will predict the evolution of Covid-19
Digipredict digital twin will predict the evolution of Covid-19
Under a cross-disciplinary program spearheaded by EPFL, scientists will develop an AI-based system that can predict whether Covid-19 patients will develop severe cardiovascular complications and, in the longer term, detect the likely onset of inflammatory disease. Covid-19 comes with a range of symptoms - from a sore throat and the loss of taste to more serious ones like lung failure.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 16.12.2020
A pair of lonely planet-like objects born like stars
A pair of lonely planet-like objects born like stars
An international research team led by the University of Bern has discovered an exotic binary system composed of two young planet-like objects, orbiting around each other from a very large distance. Although these objects look like giant exoplanets, they formed in the same way as stars, proving that the mechanisms driving star formation can produce rogue worlds in unusual systems deprived of a Sun.

Computer Science - 16.12.2020
CEA Institutes Combine 3D Integration Technologies & Many-Core Architectures to Enable High-Performance Processors That Will Power Exascale Computing
CEA Institutes Combine 3D Integration Technologies & Many-Core Architectures to Enable High-Performance Processors That Will Power Exascale Computing
Invited paper at IEDM 2020 shows benefit of CEA-List's architectures in co-optimizing CEA-Leti's 3D toolbox to enable higher bandwidth & heterogeneity for high-performance processors. CEA Institutes Combine 3D Integration Technologies & Many-Core Architectures to Enable High-Performance Processors That Will Power Exascale Computing S AN FRANCISCO - Dec.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.12.2020
Alzheimer’s Disease: Regulating Copper in the Brain Stops Memory Loss Among Mice
Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques 1 in the patient's brain. These plaques sequester copper, and contain approximately five times as much as a healthy brain. Two CNRS scientists from the Coordination Chemistry Laboratory recently developed, with their colleagues from the Guangdong University of Technology and Shenzhen University (China), a molecule that regulates the circulation of copper in the brain.

Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 16.12.2020
Variety: spice of life for bumble bees
Variety: spice of life for bumble bees
The yield and quality of many crops benefit from pollination, but it isn-t just honey bees that do this work: bumble bees also have a role. However, placing honey bee or bumble bee colonies next to the field does not guarantee that they will visit the desired plants since there may be other plant species flowering at the same time that prove more attractive.

Health - 16.12.2020
Key type of immune cell ’self-renews’ in humans
A team of scientists has shown that a key type of immune cell “self-renews? in humans. It is an unexpected discovery, as it was previously thought this specific type of “senescent? killer immune cell had reached “end-stage? and would die following one more stint at helping people fight off - or live with - certain infections.

Health - 16.12.2020
Scientists build whole functioning thymus from human cells
Researchers at UCL and the Francis Crick Institute have rebuilt a human thymus, an essential organ in the immune system, using human stem cells and a bioengineered scaffold. The study in mice marks an important step towards building artificial thymi for use in transplants. The thymus is an organ in the chest where T lymphocytes, which play a vital role in the immune system, mature.

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