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Results 61 - 80 of 2260.


Life Sciences - Health - 07.07.2020
Scaling Up Science During a Global-Scale Emergency
Scaling Up Science During a Global-Scale Emergency
Berkeley Lab's biomanufacturing experts are helping biotech companies ramp up production of new COVID-19 testing and treatment technologies S howing an inspiring knack for innovation under pressure , the global scientific community has developed promising tests and treatments for COVID-19 in the span of just a few months.

Pharmacology - Chemistry - 07.07.2020
Towards improved wound healing - Chemical synthesis of a trefoil factor peptide
Towards improved wound healing - Chemical synthesis of a trefoil factor peptide
Milestone for therapeutic development of peptides against gastrointestinal disorders The fascinating family of trefoil factor peptides brings hope to both research and industry to improve the treatment of chronic disorders such as Crohn's disease. For the first time, a team led by ERC awardee Markus Muttenthaler from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna succeeded in the synthesis and folding of the peptide TFF1, a key player in mucosal protection and repair.

Health - Social Sciences - 07.07.2020
Desk-based jobs may offer protection against poor cognition in later life
Desk-based jobs may offer protection against poor cognition in later life
People who work in jobs that require less physical activity - typically office and desk-based jobs - are at a lower risk of subsequent poor cognition than those whose work is more physically active, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 07.07.2020
1.5 Billion People Will Depend on Water from Mountains
1.5 Billion People Will Depend on Water from Mountains
Global water consumption has increased almost fourfold in the past 100 years, and many regions can only meet their water demand thanks to essential contributions from mountain regions.

Environment - Life Sciences - 07.07.2020
Evolutionary physiology and adaptation in the moor frog
Evolutionary physiology and adaptation in the moor frog
Organisms exposed to challenging environments face evolutionary pressure to adapt, which could lead to modifications in a variety of traits, such as morphology, physiology and behaviour. Katja Räsänen from the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology Eawag holds a deep interest in mechanisms of adaptation in natural populations.

Economics / Business - 07.07.2020
Report reveals the technology behind bank card gambling blockers works, but millions do not have access
Report reveals the technology behind bank card gambling blockers works, but millions do not have access
The research, published today and led by the University of Bristol, highlighted although blockers could be effective, particularly when used in conjunction with other self-exclusion tools, they need to be improved to better protect people from gambling harm. The researchers, from the university's Personal Finance Research Centre (PFRC), are recommending all card blockers include a time-release lock of at least 48 hours.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 07.07.2020
Most lakes continuously release nitrogen into the atmosphere
In a process that may help lakes maintain healthy levels of nutrients, new research from the University of Minnesota College of Biological Sciences shows that a majority of the lakes examined are continuously shedding nitrogen into the atmosphere. Nitrogen, along with phosphorus, is a nutrient that can be found in excess in some lakes.

Career - 07.07.2020
Number of Aussies not actively looking for work on the rise
Number of Aussies not actively looking for work on the rise
New data shows there are signs of improvement in labour market outcomes between May and late June, though hours worked are still below pre-COVID levels. But the number of Australians actively looking for work has declined, according to the researchers. The analysis builds on a first-of-its kind longitudinal study of people's activities and wellbeing before and after the COVID-19 crisis.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 07.07.2020
Bores lasting effect on landscape
Bores lasting effect on landscape
Artificial watering points in rangelands are posing an increasing threat to surrounding biodiversity long after the removal of livestock, according to University of Queensland research. UQ researcher Graham Fulton studied the behaviour and impact of 20 bird species on Faure Island in Western Australia's Shark Bay - a nature and conservation reserve which had previously been a pastoral station.

Physics - 06.07.2020
The full moon may not be protected by Earth’s magnetic field after all
A study published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics shows that the magnetosphere can flap across the moon much like a windsock, exposing it to hazardous solar wind particles. Previous simulations suggested that lunar satellites and astronauts on the surface could be considered safe during a full moon while it resides within the magnetosphere.

Chemistry - 06.07.2020
Cosmic Waves
Cosmic Waves
The molecular gas in galaxies is organised into a hierarchy of structures. It moves along filament-like orbits to centres of gas and dust where it is compressed into stars and planets. To better understand this, an international team of astronomers led by Dr Jonathan Henshaw from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy and Dr Diederik Kruijssen from the Center for Astronomy at Heidelberg University examined gas movements on various size scales.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.07.2020
Age-related impairments reversed in animal model
Age-related impairments reversed in animal model
Frailty and immune decline are two main features of old age. Researchers from the University of Bern and the University Hospital Bern now demonstrate in an animal model that these two age-related impairments can be halted and even partially reversed using a novel cell-based therapeutic approach. Elderly people are more prone to infectious diseases as the function of their immune system continuously declines with progression of age.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 06.07.2020
How do bacteria build up natural products?
How do bacteria build up natural products?
X-ray structure analysis gives detailed insights into molecular factory The active agents of many drugs are natural products, so called because often only microorganisms are able to produce the complex structures. Similar to the production line in a factory, large enzyme complexes put these active agent molecules together.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.07.2020
Male fruit flies’ decline in fertility with age is not only driven by changes in sperm
Infertility is one of the most striking effects of ageing. The impact of ageing on females' fertility is more severe and much better understood, but it also affects males. Male reproductive ageing is less researched, but of those studies that do address it, most focus on sperm. However, ejaculate contains more than just sperm.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.07.2020
Gut bacteria improve type 2 diabetes risk prediction
Gut bacteria improve type 2 diabetes risk prediction
Large-scale study with more than 4000 participants at ZIEL - Institute for Food & Health The composition and function of bacteria in the human intestine - the so-called gut microbiome - changes as the day progresses. This was established by researchers based in Freising at ZIEL - Institute for Food & Health of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) with one of the largest studies related to microbiomes and diabetes comprising more than 4000 participants.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 06.07.2020
Structural insights into Fe-S protein biogenesis
Structural insights into Fe-S protein biogenesis
The cytosolic iron sulfur assembly (CIA) pathway is required for the insertion of Fe-S clusters into proteins, including many DNA replication and repair factors. Despite its essential cellular function, this pathway remains enigmatic. A new integrative structural and biochemical study from the Thomä group now provides detailed insights into the mechanisms of Fe-S protein biogenesis.

Environment - 06.07.2020
Future Texas hurricanes: Fast like Ike or slow like Harvey?
Future Texas hurricanes: Fast like Ike or slow like Harvey?
Climate change will make fast-moving storms more likely in late 21st-century Texas Climate change will intensify winds that steer hurricanes north over Texas in the final 25 years of this century, increasing the odds for fast-moving storms like 2008's Ike compared with slow-movers like 2017's Harvey, according to new research.

Physics - Chemistry - 06.07.2020
Flashes bright when squeezed tight: how single-celled organisms light up the oceans
Flashes bright when squeezed tight: how single-celled organisms light up the oceans
Research explains how a unicellular marine organism generates light as a response to mechanical stimulation, lighting up breaking waves at night. Our findings show how elegant decision-making can be on a single-cell level Maziyar Jalaal Every few years, a bloom of microscopic organisms called dinoflagellates transforms the coasts around the world by endowing breaking waves with an eerie blue glow.

Materials Science - Life Sciences - 06.07.2020
Cell 'membrane on a chip' could speed up screening of drug candidates for COVID-19
Cell ’membrane on a chip’ could speed up screening of drug candidates for COVID-19
Researchers have developed a human cell 'membrane on a chip' that allows continuous monitoring of how drugs and infectious agents interact with our cells, and may soon be used to test potential drug candidates for COVID-19. This type of screening is typically done by the pharmaceutical industry with live cells, but our device provides an easier alternative Róisín Owens The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, Cornell University and Stanford University, say their device could mimic any cell type-bacterial, human or even the tough cells walls of plants.

Materials Science - 06.07.2020
Outsmarting self-organization
Outsmarting self-organization
Researchers at ETH Zurich have coaxed tiny spheres made of polymer gels into forming complex patterns by themselves through a two-step process. Surfaces with tailor-made optical and mechanical properties could be realized in this way. When retiling the bathroom or the terrace using, for instance, square, rectangular or hexagonal tiles, the result will be a simple and regular pattern - assuming one doesn't make any mistakes.

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