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Results 61 - 80 of 3083.


Health - 11.09.2020
Study to identify transmission risk of COVID-19 aerosols during medical procedures
Many operations, due to the potential risk of COVID-19 aerosols being generated, have been delayed or are being performed with additional personal protective equipment (PPE), which has greatly reduced NHS services. A new National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI)-funded study will identify which medical procedures are truly aerosol generating and whether the virus remains viable in the aerosol produced.

Life Sciences - Materials Science - 11.09.2020
Altgold Helps Build Silk Scaffolding for Tissue
SURF student supports new 3D printing technique for bioengineering Carnegie Mellon University undergraduate Tahlia Altgold makes biomedical research using silk run more smoothly. "Silk is a really incredible biomedical material that's been used for a long time in things like sutures,” said Altgold, a junior majoring in materials science and biomedical engineering.

Health - Computer Science - 11.09.2020
Pandemic Spawns ’Infodemic’ in Scientific Literature
New policies, technologies could help make sense of flood of information The science community has responded to the COVID-19 pandemic with such a flurry of research studies that it is hard for anyone to digest them all. This conundrum underscores a long-standing need to make scientific publication more accessible, transparent and accountable, two artificial intelligence experts assert in a data science journal.

Chemistry - Social Sciences - 11.09.2020
To recreate ancient recipes, check out the vestiges of clay pots
The residue in these seven La Chamba pots retained evidence of all the meals prepared in them. (Photo courtesy of Melanie Miller) If you happen to dig up an ancient ceramic cooking pot, don't clean it. Chances are, it contains the culinary secrets of the past. A research team led by UC Berkeley archaeologists has discovered that unglazed ceramic cookware can retain the residue of not just the last supper cooked, but, potentially, earlier dishes cooked across a pot's lifetime, opening a window onto the past.

Health - 11.09.2020
New immunotherapy to beat cancer
In brief: Sophie Lucas (UCLouvain de Duve Institute) and her team succeeded in neutralising a molecule that blocks the immune system against cancer UCLouvain scientists discovered that this new immunotherapy increases the action of another well-known but not always effective immunotherapy, and that it makes tumour regression possible This very promising discovery in the fight against cancer is published in the prestigious scientific journal Natu

Earth Sciences - Environment - 11.09.2020
Worldwide loss of phosphorus due to soil erosion quantified for the first time
Worldwide loss of phosphorus due to soil erosion quantified for the first time
Phosphorus is essential for agriculture, yet this important plant nutrient is increasingly being lost from soils around the world. The primary cause is soil erosion, reports an international research team led by the University of Basel. The study Communications shows which continents and regions are most strongly affected.

Health - Social Sciences - 11.09.2020
Testing the deceased could provide additional surveillance methods during pandemic
Testing for the coronavirus on those who have died could supplement other forms of surveillance and serve as a possible early outbreak warning sign, say University of Michigan researchers. "This kind of surveillance could be really useful and serve as an inexpensive testing method, especially in urban areas,” said Andrew Brouwer, an assistant research scientist at U-M's School of Public Health.

Health - Social Sciences - 11.09.2020
How can we get pupils and staff back-to-school safely during COVID-19?
Ensuring pupils and staff stay safe when they return to school this autumn is a major challenge because there is very little scientific evidence on the incidence and transmission of COVID-19 within schools. A ground-breaking research project will test whether 5,000 staff and pupils have active or past COVID-19 infection, develop systems to help schools prevent and cope with an outbreak and assess strategies to support the mental wellbeing of the school community now and moving forward.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.09.2020
COVID-19 exposure and viral carriage in health care workers
2.4% of asymptomatic health care workers at work in Birmingham were carriers of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and over a third of those individuals subsequently became unwell with symptoms of COVID-19, a new cross-sectional study by researchers at the University of Birmingham and University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust has found.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 11.09.2020
Loss of sea otters accelerating the effects of climate change
The impacts of predator loss and climate change are combining to devastate living reefs that have defined Alaskan kelp forests for centuries, according to new research published in Science. "We discovered that massive limestone reefs built by algae underpin the Aleutian Islands' kelp forest ecosystem," said Douglas Rasher, a senior research scientist at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences and the lead author of the study.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 11.09.2020
Mapping the depths of the genome
Mapping the depths of the genome
Using algorithms to analyse the whole-genome sequence of a tumour can make treatment more successful - and can even help determine how cells become cancerous. Detailed genetic analysis of tumour tissue samples has become standard practice at a small number of the world's leading hospitals specialising in cancer treatment.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 11.09.2020
Let there be light and the process stops
Let there be light and the process stops
Researchers have discovered that they can use light-sensitive molecules to switch genetic networks on and off as required. Their finding gives rise to an easy method for dynamically controlling biotechnological substance production. Tetracycline (Tc), an antibiotic, and its derivative anhydrotetracycline (aTc) enjoy widespread use in biotechnology and synthetic biology.

Physics - Materials Science - 10.09.2020
Computational modelling explains why blues and greens are brightest colours in nature
Computational modelling explains why blues and greens are brightest colours in nature
Researchers have shown why intense, pure red colours in nature are mainly produced by pigments, instead of the structural colour that produces bright blue and green hues.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.09.2020
Stronger bones thanks to heat and microbiota
Stronger bones thanks to heat and microbiota
UNIGE Scientists demonstrate that warmth exposure improves bone strength, and decipher the role of gut microbiota in this phenomenon. This gives rise to innovative perspectives in the treatment of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis, a bone disease linked to ageing, is characterised by a loss of bone density, micro-architectural deterioration of the bones and an increased risk of fractures.

Health - 10.09.2020
Autistic adults have a higher rate of physical health conditions
Autistic adults have a higher rate of physical health conditions
Autistic individuals are more likely to have chronic physical health conditions, particularly heart, lung, and diabetic conditions, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Cambridge. The results are published in the journal Autism. This is a first step in better understanding why autistic individuals are so much more likely to have chronic physical health problems Elizabeth Weir Earlier research has shown that autistic people on average die younger than others and that this may be, in part, due to chronic physical health conditions.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 10.09.2020
Older people in Sierra Leone face ’ticking time bomb’ of health issues - study
Three-quarters of people over-40 in Sierra Leone have at least one health factor that could contribute to cardiovascular disease - creating a ‘ticking time bomb' of death and disability in one of the world's poorest counties, a new study reveals. Researchers found that cardiovascular disease risk factors (CVDRFs) such as hypertension, diabetes and obesity are much more common in Sierra Leone than expected, whilst access to health care for these conditions is low.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10.09.2020
Holding up a mirror to a dark matter discrepancy
Holding up a mirror to a dark matter discrepancy
The universe's funhouse mirrors are revealing a difference between how dark matter behaves in theory and how it appears to act in reality. Dark matter is the invisible glue that keeps stars bound together inside a galaxy. It makes up most of a galaxy's mass and creates an invisible scaffold that tethers galaxies to form clusters.

Electroengineering - Environment - 10.09.2020
Transistor-integrated cooling for a more powerful chip
Transistor-integrated cooling for a more powerful chip
Researchers have created a single chip that combines a transistor and micro-fluidic cooling system. Managing the heat generated in electronics is a huge problem, especially with the constant push to reduce the size and pack as many transistors as possible in the same chip. The whole problem is how to manage such high heat fluxes efficiently.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.09.2020
Mutation leading to biological changes may play role in cancer
McGill research team generates the first mouse expressing Estrogen Receptor mutation early on in development  By Marie Moucarry   A new study from McGill University's Goodman Cancer Research Centre (GCRC) has revealed significant biological changes in mice expressing an activated, mutant form of the Estrogen Receptor alpha (ER alpha), shedding new light on the role of this important gene in development and cancer. Over-expressed in approximately

Environment - 10.09.2020
Bumblebees benefit from faba bean cultivation
Bumblebees benefit from faba bean cultivation
Research team led by the University of Göttingen investigates influence of -greening measures- on pollinators About one third of the payments received by farmers are linked to specific -greening measures- to promote biodiversity. The cultivation of nitrogen-fixing legumes is very popular. However, these measures have been criticized because the benefits for biodiversity are unclear.

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