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Music - Psychology - 25.03.2020
Integrate an orchestra increases capabilities cognitive
Integrate an orchestra increases capabilities cognitive
The EmoDémos project - led by the University of Geneva among children aged 7 to 12 years - has shown that playing an instrument in an orchestra can facilitate the acquisition of cognitive and emotional skills in two years.

Materials Science - 25.03.2020
Printing complex cellulose-based objects
Printing complex cellulose-based objects
Researchers from ETH Zurich and the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa) have set a new world record: they 3D printed complex objects with higher cellulose content than that of any other additively manufactured cellulose-based parts. To achieve this, they used a clever trick.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 25.03.2020
Scientists get first look at cause of 'slow motion' earthquakes
Scientists get first look at cause of ’slow motion’ earthquakes
An international team of scientists has for the first time identified the conditions deep below the Earth's surface that lead to the triggering of so-called ‘slow motion' earthquakes. These events, more commonly known as slow slip events, are similar to regular sudden and catastrophic earthquakes but take place on much longer timescales, usually from days to months.

Mathematics - Sport - 25.03.2020
How to break new records in the 200 metres?
How to break new records in the 200 metres?
Usain Bolt's 200m record has not been beaten for ten years and Florence Griffith Joyner's for more than thirty years. And what about if the secret behind beating records was to use mathematics' Thanks to a mathematical model, Amandine Aftalion, CNRS researcher at the Centre d'analyse et de mathématique sociales (CNRS/EHESS), and Emmanuel Trélat, a Sorbonne Université researcher at the Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions (CNRS/Sorbonne Université/ Université de Paris) have proved that the geometry of athletic tracks could be optimised to improve records.

Health - 25.03.2020
Greater social distancing could curb COVID-19 in 13 weeks
Greater social distancing could curb COVID-19 in 13 weeks
A University of Sydney data study from the Faculty of Engineering has revealed that social distancing must be adopted by at least 80 percent of the Australian population to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Social Sciences - Health - 24.03.2020
Repeat offenders’ lifestyles ’may put them at higher risk of coronavirus’
The “impulsive and risk-taking” lifestyles of repeat offenders means they are likely to be at higher risk of catching - and spreading - coronavirus, a leading criminologist suggests. Working with criminologists at Cambridge University, Professor Jonathan Shepherd, a surgeon and Cardiff University criminologist, found clear links between anti-social lifestyles and poor health.

Pharmacology - 24.03.2020
May help older adults stay physically capable for longer
Drug therapies that help older adults maintain their skeletal muscle mass and physical function for longer could be a step closer after researchers at the University of Birmingham identify a key mechanism that drives the clearance of damaged mitochondria. A team in the University's School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences are well-versed at investigating dynamic machinery within cells called mitochondria.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.03.2020
Finding the best method to grow bioengineered tissue for pulmonary research
Finding the best method to grow bioengineered tissue for pulmonary research
Before scientists develop the bioengineered tissue of tomorrow for treating pulmonary diseases, they need to identify the best methods for growing tissue for artificial trachea and lungs in experiments today. A new Yale analysis does just that, determining which methods produce tissue cells that are most like the natural cells they would replace.

Health - Pharmacology - 24.03.2020
A stopgap measure to treat respiratory distress
A stopgap measure to treat respiratory distress
Repurposing a drug used for blood clots may help Covid-19 patients in danger of respiratory failure, researchers suggest. Researchers at MIT and the University of Colorado at Denver have proposed a stopgap measure that they believe could help Covid-19 patients who are in acute respiratory distress. By repurposing a drug that is now used to treat blood clots, they believe they could help people in cases where a ventilator is not helping, or if a ventilator is not available.

Health - Pharmacology - 24.03.2020
UC San Diego Health Launches Clinical Trial to Assess Antiviral Drug for COVID-19
With three other UC Health medical centers, NIH-sponsored trial will study whether remdesivir, an investigational antiviral drug, may be a safe and effective agent against the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 Physician-scientists at four University of California Health medical centers — UC San Diego Health, UC San Francisco, UC Irvine Health and UC Davis Health — have begun recruiting participants for a Phase II clinical trial

Business / Economics - 24.03.2020
Countries with weaker handwashing culture more exposed to COVID-19
Countries where people do not have a habit of washing their hands automatically tend to have a much higher exposure to coronavirus, a new study reveals. University of Birmingham researchers have discovered that at least 50% of people do not have a habit of automatic handwashing after using the toilet in China (77%), Japan (70%), South Korea (61%) and the Netherlands (50%).

Pharmacology - Administration - 24.03.2020
Oxford's COVID-19 research receives government funding
Oxford’s COVID-19 research receives government funding
Three Oxford-based COVID-19 projects are among the first to benefit from a share of £20 million in government investment. The three projects include work on an effective vaccine, enabling pre-clinical and clinical vaccine trials, as well as supporting researchers to develop manufacturing processes to produce a vaccine at a million-dose scale. Another project will examine how existing treatments could be repurposed to treat coronavirus.

Life Sciences - Environment - 24.03.2020
Bristol develops photosynthetic proteins for more sustainable solar-powered devices
Bristol develops photosynthetic proteins for more sustainable solar-powered devices
The initiative is part of a broader effort in the field of synthetic biology to use proteins in place of man-made materials which are often scarce, expensive and can be harmful to the environment when the device becomes obsolete. The aim of the study, published today , was the development of “chimera” photosynthetic complexes that display poly-chromatic solar energy harvesting.

Materials Science - Physics - 24.03.2020
Activating palladium catalysis by light: teaching an old transition metal new tricks
Activating palladium catalysis by light: teaching an old transition metal new tricks
In the production of compounds, chemists have the fundamental goal of finding strategies that are most selective and avoid waste products. Breakthroughs in this area serve, among other things, to drive industrial innovation and drug development. In this context, allylic substitution reactions using catalysts made of so-called transition metals have already led to significant advances in science.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 24.03.2020
Ships' emissions create measurable regional change in clouds
Ships’ emissions create measurable regional change in clouds
A container ship leaves a trail of white clouds in its wake that can linger in the air for hours. This puffy line is not just exhaust from the engine, but a change in the clouds that's caused by small airborne particles of pollution. New research led by the University of Washington is the first to measure this phenomenon's effect over years and at a regional scale.

Life Sciences - 24.03.2020
Brain or muscles, what do we lose first?
Brain or muscles, what do we lose first?
Researchers have shown that the decline in cognitive abilities after 50 years of age results in a decline in physical activity, and that - contrary to what has been suggested by the literature to date - the inverse relationship is much weaker. Someone dies somewhere in the world every 10 seconds owing to physical inactivity - 3.2 million people a year according to the World Health Organisation (WHO).

Environment - 24.03.2020
Unearthing technical solutions for a low carbon future: CCS
A University of Queensland study has revealed that carbon capture and storage (CCS) could be a real option for Queensland. The release of this study is particularly timely, with the Australian Government recently flagging a role for CCS in its technology investment roadmap to deepen cuts to Australia's carbon emissions.

Environment - Transport - 23.03.2020
Electric cars better for climate in 95% of the world
Electric cars better for climate in 95% of the world
Fears that electric cars could actually increase carbon emissions are unfounded in almost all parts of the world, new research shows. Understanding the effect of low-carbon innovations on relevant sectors of the economy, such as heating and transport, is crucial for the development of effective policy Pablo Salas Reports have questioned whether electric cars really are 'greener' once emissions from production and generating their electricity are taken into account.

Environment - 23.03.2020
Uncertainty about facts can be reported without damaging public trust in news - study
A series of experiments - including one on the BBC News website -finds the use of numerical ranges in news reports helps us grasp the uncertainty of stats while maintaining trust in data and its sources.  Ultimately we'd like to see the cultivation of psychological comfort around the fact that knowledge and data always contain uncertainty Sander van der Linden The numbers that drive headlines - those on Covid-19 infections, for example - contain significant levels of uncertainty: assumptions, limitations, extrapolations, and so on.

Health - 23.03.2020
Breast cancer screening costs high, benefits uncertain, for women in 40s
There are substantial costs associated with breast cancer screenings for U.S. women in their 40s, a new Yale-led study finds, and these costs vary widely by region. The study, conducted by researchers at Yale, University of Oslo, and New York University, found that over 40% of the eligible, privately insured women ages 40-49 received annual breast cancer screening in 2017 and estimated the national cost of those procedures to be $2.13 billion per year.

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