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Results 81 - 100 of 4184.


Health - Environment - 16.12.2020
New study links cadmium to more severe flu, pneumonia infections
High levels of cadmium, a chemical found in cigarettes and in contaminated vegetables, are associated with higher death rates in patients with influenza or pneumonia-and may increase the severity of COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses, according to a new study. "Our study suggests the public in general, both smokers and nonsmokers, could benefit from reduced exposure to cadmium,” said lead author Sung Kyun Park, associate professor of epidemiology and environmental health sciences at the University of Michigan School of Public Health.

Environment - Life Sciences - 16.12.2020
Fishing alters fish behaviour and features in exploited ecosystems
The research study was carried out in two different habitats: in the Cíes Islands (Vigo), a protected marine area where recreational fishing is not allowed, and in contiguous areas open to fishing. Photo: Lluís Cardona. 16/12/2020 Recerca Not all specimens of the same species are the same: there is a marked variability within the same population and sometimes these morphological differences are translated into a different behaviour.

Social Sciences - Campus - 16.12.2020
How the spread of the Internet is changing migration
The spread of the Internet is shaping migration in profound ways. A McGill-led study of over 150 countries links Internet penetration with migration intentions and behaviours, suggesting that digital connectivity plays a key role in migration decisions and actively supports the migration process. Countries with higher proportions of Internet users tend to have more people who are willing to emigrate.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 16.12.2020
New use for an old drug: How does ketamine combat depression?
A group of proteins called 4E-BPs, involved in memory formation, is the key to unlocking the antidepressant effect of ketamine in the brain, according to researchers from three Canadian universities. The discovery could lead to better and safer treatments for certain patients suffering from major depression.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 16.12.2020
The 16 facial expressions most common to emotional situations worldwide
Facial expressions of emotion transcend geography and culture, new study shows. (Image by Alan Cowen) Whether at a birthday party in Brazil, a funeral in Kenya or protests in Hong Kong, humans all use variations of the same facial expressions in similar social contexts, such as smiles, frowns, grimaces and scowls, a new UC Berkeley study shows.

Life Sciences - 16.12.2020
Ringo Starr of the bird world heading for extinction
New research from The Australian National University (ANU) shows palm cockatoos, renowned for their human-like musical drumming behaviour, are threatened with extinction.

Health - 16.12.2020
Aroma diffuser and plastic bag offer inexpensive method to test fit of face masks at home
Aroma diffuser and plastic bag offer inexpensive method to test fit of face masks at home
Researchers have developed a way to use a simple home aroma diffuser to test whether N95 and other types of sealing masks, such as KN95 and FFP2 masks, are properly fitted, a result which could be used to help protect healthcare workers and the public from contracting or transmitting COVID-19.

Health - Social Sciences - 15.12.2020
Levels of diabetes have trebled in 25 years
The proportion of adults with diagnosed diabetes trebled between 1994 and 2019, report researchers from UCL and the National Centre for Social Research (NatCen), who have analysed the latest results from the Health Survey for England (HSE). The report, which is commisisoned by NHS Digital, analyses data from over 8,200 adults and 2,000 children living in private households in England and shows the percentage of people who have been diagnosed with diabetes has risen since 1994, from 3% to 9% among men and from 2% to 6% among women.

Health - 15.12.2020
Poverty linked to higher risk of Covid-19 death
Poverty linked to higher risk of Covid-19 death, study suggests People in Scotland's poorest areas are more likely to be affected by severe Covid-19 - and to die from the disease - than those in more affluent districts, according to a study of critical care units. The first nationwide study of its kind found patients from the most economically disadvantaged areas had a higher chance of critical care admission, and that intensive care units there were more likely to be over capacity.

Health - Social Sciences - 15.12.2020
Majority of University of Bristol students are complying with government COVID-19 guidelines
The majority of University of Bristol students are complying with government COVID-19 guidelines and are self-isolating when receiving a positive test, indicates a study that has investigated student social contact patterns and behaviours. The research led by scientists at the University of Bristol is published on the pre-print server medRxiv.

Computer Science - Physics - 15.12.2020
A.I. model shows promise to generate faster, more accurate weather forecasts
A.I. model shows promise to generate faster, more accurate weather forecasts
Today's weather forecasts come from some of the most powerful computers on Earth. The huge machines churn through millions of calculations to solve equations to predict temperature, wind, rainfall and other weather events. A forecast's combined need for speed and accuracy taxes even the most modern computers.

Environment - Campus - 15.12.2020
’Peecycling’ payoff: Urine diversion shows multiple environmental benefits when used at city scale
Diverting urine away from municipal wastewater treatment plants and recycling the nutrient-rich liquid to make crop fertilizer would result in multiple environmental benefits when used at city scale, according to a new University of Michigan-led study. The study, published online Dec. 15 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, modeled large-scale, centralized urine-diversion and fertilizer-processing systems-none of which currently exist-and compared their expected environmental impacts to conventional wastewater treatment and fertilizer production methods.

Astronomy / Space Science - 15.12.2020
Sussex students among scientists to spot 700 million new stars and space objects
Sussex students among scientists to spot 700 million new stars and space objects
Two Sussex students are among scientists from across the world to have catalogued almost 700 million new astronomical objects in the Dark Energy Survey, which is the most detailed survey ever taken of the dark sky. Astronomical objects include stars, planets, moons, asteroids and comets. Post-graduate researchers Reese Wilkinson and David Turner joined Professor Kathy Romer at the Cerro Tololo observatory on a mountain in Chile to take part in the survey.

Economics / Business - Health - 15.12.2020
Don’t follow the herd: How governments’ tough Covid restrictions can help limit economic damage
The UK Government's hesitancy to bring in tougher Covid restrictions exacerbated investor herding, market volatility and greater harm to its economy compared to countries with swifter and more decisive pandemic responses, new research indicates. Countries with more stringent government responses to the coronavirus crisis benefitted from lower levels of investor herding, newly published research from the University of Sussex Business School , Southampton Business School and University of Brescia (Italy) reveals.

Life Sciences - Environment - 15.12.2020
Are Britain’s land animals eating plastic?
Programmes such as the BBC's Blue Planet and Hugh's War on Plastic , have drawn attention to the threat plastics pose to sea-life. But little is known about the impacts on Britain's land-based species, such as hedgehogs, rabbits and voles. Now, a new research project from the University of Sussex and the Mammal Society, aims to assess the exposure of wild mammals to waste plastics across Britain.

Social Sciences - 15.12.2020
Study offers insights into why inequality and economic decline drive polarisation
Visiting Professor Joanna Bryson has co-authored a study showing why rebuilding trust in societies can be so challenging. Last updated on Tuesday 15 December 2020 Polarisation, such as the emergence of extreme right or left movements, can create conflict and keep individuals and even governments from working toward a common good.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.12.2020
What loneliness looks like in the brain
Neural "signature" may reflect how we respond to feelings of social isolation This holiday season will be a lonely one for many people as social distancing due to COVID-19 continues, and it is important to understand how isolation affects our health. A new study shows a sort of signature in the brains of lonely people that make them distinct in fundamental ways, based on variations in the volume of different brain regions as well as based on how those regions communicate with one another across brain networks.

Physics - Materials Science - 15.12.2020
Weak force has strong impact on nanosheets
Weak force has strong impact on nanosheets
Rice lab finds van der Waals force can deform nanoscale silver for optics, catalytic use You have to look closely, but the hills are alive with the force of van der Waals. Rice University scientists found that nature's ubiquitous "weak" force is sufficient to indent rigid nanosheets, extending their potential for use in nanoscale optics or catalytic systems.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.12.2020
Apathy could predict onset of dementia years before other symptoms
Apathy could predict onset of dementia years before other symptoms
Apathy - a lack of interest or motivation - could predict the onset of some forms of dementia many years before symptoms start, offering a 'window of opportunity' to treat the disease at an early stage, according to new research from a team of scientists led by Professor James Rowe at the University of Cambridge.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.12.2020
Remdesivir likely to be highly effective antiviral against SARS-CoV-2 for some patients
Remdesivir likely to be highly effective antiviral against SARS-CoV-2 for some patients
The drug remdesivir is likely to be a highly effective antiviral against SARS-CoV-2, according to a new study by a team of UK scientists. Writing , the researchers describe giving the drug to a patient with COVID-19 and a rare immune disorder, and observing a dramatic improvement in his symptoms and the disappearance of the virus.

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