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Campus - Pedagogy - 02.12.2020
Parents shouldn’t worry about their baby’s inconsistent sleep patterns
New parents often expect their baby to start sleeping through the night around the time they reach six months of age. But according to a new study led by Professor Marie-Hélène Pennestri, parents should view sleep consolidation as a process, instead of a milestone to be achieved at a specific age. Tracking 44 infants over a period of two weeks, she found that sleeping patterns vary greatly - not only for different babies, but also night to night for the same baby.

Campus - 17.11.2020
New Edition Personnel Magazine UGent’ers Now Available!
The second edition of UGent'ers will arrive in your mailbox this week. Sneak-preview: Claudia and Wuxia compare Ghent to their hometown, Napels and Guizhou.

History / Archeology - Campus - 10.11.2020
Hundreds of Copies of Newton’s Principia Found in New Census
In a story of lost and stolen books and scrupulous detective work across continents, a Caltech historian and his former student have unearthed previously uncounted copies of Isaac Newton's groundbreaking science book Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica , known more colloquially as the Principia .

Health - Campus - 02.11.2020
Mind the gap: Discrepancies in walking assessments for people with Multiple Sclerosis
Significant gaps in how walking capacity and performance is assessed for people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) could be harming therapy and treatment development according to McGill University researchers. The study, published in the International Journal of MS Care , examined the differential between measurement tools for clinical walking capacity and real-world performance.

Health - Campus - 28.10.2020
Poor memory tied to attention lapses and media multitasking
Stanford researchers are connecting the dots between attention and memory to explain why we remember certain things and forget others, why some people remember better than others and how media multitasking affects how well we recall. The eyes may be the windows to the soul, but they can also provide insightful glimpses into memory.

Health - Campus - 19.10.2020
Studies investigate need for and impact of culturally aware mentorship training
Higher education institutions frequently offer mentored research experiences to increase undergraduate student interest, motivation and preparedness for research careers in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematic and Medicine (STEMM) fields. However, for participating students from historically underrepresented groups, unaddressed cultural factors may hinder engagement and result in a less effective mentoring relationship.

Life Sciences - Campus - 14.10.2020
The Brain Quenches Thirst in Different Ways
After eating a bag of salty potato chips, you probably feel thirsty. And after a long period of exercise, you also probably feel thirsty. However, these two types of thirst are not the same. In the first example, you would likely reach for water. This is because after eating chips, the concentration of salts and minerals in your blood becomes elevated, which induces a state called osmotic thirst.

Campus - 09.10.2020
When stuck in a rut, it may be time to try ideas from others
When stuck in a rut, it may be time to try ideas from others
When attempting to solve a problem, people often fall back on prior experiences that worked, sometimes without considering other solutions. In other words, they stay in their comfort zone, which psychologists call "fixation.” Researchers at the University of Michigan, University of Limerick and Iowa State University investigated what happens when new engineers attempt to design a solution on their own with no examples: They tend to stick to their original idea and not try other options.

Politics - Campus - 08.10.2020
Women’s Incomes Improve When Democrats Hold Public Office
In an increasingly polarized political system, Democratic control has a meaningful impact on narrowing the gender gap New research from the University of California San Diego reveals that Democratic control of state houses leads to substantial improvement in women's incomes, wages and unemployment relative to men.

Physics - Campus - 06.10.2020
Extremely Rare Higgs Boson Decay Process Spotted
The Higgs boson reached overnight fame in 2012 when it was finally discovered in a jumble of other particles generated at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, Switzerland. The discovery was monumental because the Higgs boson, which had only been theorized about previously, has the special property of endowing other elementary particles with mass.

Health - Campus - 06.10.2020
Polycystic ovary syndrome increases risk for gestational diabetes and hypertensive disorders
A recent study by researchers at McGill University has identified polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) as an independent risk factor for gestational diabetes and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. The condition, known to lead to multiple reproductive complications, including infertility, affects 1 in 10 women of childbearing age.

Economics / Business - Campus - 01.10.2020
Consumers’ race, income affect quality of financial services, treatment by lenders
Unfair, unequal treatment of poor and minority customers of financial institutions is nothing new. Nor are efforts to protect vulnerable populations through changes to the law. New research by University of Michigan finance professor Amiyatosh Purnanandam finds federal regulations aimed at ensuring equal access to credit has an unintended consequence: The quantity of financial products and services has increased but the quality of the offerings are much lower for the lower-income, minority borrowers.

Campus - 29.09.2020
E-cigarettes ’gateway’ to smoking for non-smokers
Using e-cigarettes triples the chance of a non-smoker taking up cigarettes and there is "insufficient" evidence that they help smokers quit, according to a new report submitted to the Government.  Research led by The Australian National University (ANU) reviewed the worldwide evidence on e-cigarettes and smoking behaviour, relevant to the Australian context.    "We found clear evidence that non-smokers who use e-cigarettes are around three times

Health - Campus - 28.09.2020
Long-term COVID-19 containment will be shaped by strength and duration of natural, vaccine-induced immunity
New research suggests that the impact of natural and vaccine-induced immunity will be key factors in shaping the future trajectory of the global coronavirus pandemic, known as COVID-19. In particular, a vaccine capable of eliciting a strong immune response could substantially reduce the future burden of infection, according to a study recently published in the journal Science .

Psychology - Campus - 25.09.2020
Social isolation causing psychological distress among university students
Surprisingly, university students without pre-existing mental health concerns seem to be suffering greater psychological distress during the pandemic than their peers with pre-existing mental health problems according to a study of close to 800 university students in Toronto carried out by researchers from McGill and University of Toronto.

Computer Science - Campus - 22.09.2020
Predicting wildfires with CAT scans
Predicting wildfires with CAT scans
Engineers at Stanford have used X-ray CT scans, more common in hospital labs, to study how wood catches fire. They've now turned that knowledge into a computer simulation to predict where fires will strike and spread. As wildfires rage across much of the American West, researchers at Stanford have used CAT scanners, the same instruments used in medicine to peer inside the human body, to understand the process of smoldering - the state of burning without flame that often leads to fire.

Economics / Business - Campus - 22.09.2020
Who is the weakest link? Understanding global supply chains
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused kinks in the movement of goods and services around the globe, but how important a role do multinational companies play in local economies and supply chains? From toilet paper to industrial chemicals, there's no doubt the COVID-19 pandemic has been disruptive to global supply chains.

Social Sciences - Campus - 21.09.2020
Homicides near schools affect students’ educational outcomes says new study
Homicides near schools negatively impact on the educational attainment of children, a new study in the Journal of Labor Economics reports. During this unique study, researchers from the University of Birmingham and University of Surrey investigated if exposure to homicides had an impact on the educational outcomes of children in schools close by.

Life Sciences - Campus - 21.09.2020
First genetic sequencing of COVID in Quebec shows roots of outbreak
Initial results of study show that an estimated 250 independent events following spring break travel in March led to 60,000 people being infected September 21, 2020 (MONTREAL, Quebec) - Today the Institut national de santé publique du Québec (INSPQ) and the McGill Genome Centre announced the initial results of their study into the genetic sequencing of the SARS-CoV-2 genome, the virus responsible for the outbreak of COVID-19.

Life Sciences - Campus - 17.09.2020
'Cellular compass' guides plant stem cell division
’Cellular compass’ guides plant stem cell division
Biologists observing the formation of leaves noticed the nuclei moved in bewildering ways. Further investigation uncovered proteins that act as compasses and motors, guiding the divisions of individual cells to create the overall pattern of the leaf. The stem cells tasked with creating and maintaining biological tissues have a difficult job.

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