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Results 21 - 40 of 65.


Environment - Economics / Business - 26.06.2020
Warning on affluence
Lorenz Keysser believes that in order to overcome ecological crises, we must recognise affluence as a main driver and fundamentally reconsider our economy and lifestyle. A new mobile phone here, a new dress there, heading on holiday by SUV or further afield by plane, and - for those who can afford it - a big house.

Social Sciences - Economics / Business - 25.06.2020
'Poverty alleviation' and 'needy'' Why words can do more harm than good when offering help
’Poverty alleviation’ and ’needy’’ Why words can do more harm than good when offering help
Stanford psychologists suggest that aid programs can be more effective with messaging that conveys dignity and empowerment in culturally relevant ways and does not jeopardize donations. Non-profits often pull at donors' heartstrings by casting aid recipients as "poor," "needy" or "vulnerable." But new Stanford research shows how such demeaning language can undermine their goal to help others.

Economics / Business - 25.06.2020
Resource curse or resource blessing: How major oil discoveries keep autocrats in power
Resource curse or resource blessing: How major oil discoveries keep autocrats in power
Oil is the most effective natural resource when it comes to keeping despots in power, new research shows. Oil is a more useful resource for rulers looking to hold onto power than minerals such as copper, nickel or zinc but its' benefits are felt most strongly more than a decade after a discovery is made, according to new research led by the University of Sussex Business School.

Economics / Business - 25.06.2020
Helping consumers in a crisis
Helping consumers in a crisis
"Quantitative easing" program let households spend more during the last recession. Could it work again? A new study shows that the central bank tool known as quantitative easing helped consumers substantially during the last big economic downturn - a finding with clear relevance for today's pandemic-hit economy.

Economics / Business - 22.06.2020
Home foreclosures can have devastating, long-term impacts
Stanford economist Rebecca Diamond compiled a unique dataset to uncover fresh research insights into foreclosure's effects on homeowners, landlords and renters. As the pandemic-ravaged U.S. economy braces for a likely wave of housing foreclosures, a new study shows that losing a home can have painful ramifications that extend far beyond the immediate financial damage.

Economics / Business - 22.06.2020
Manufacturers must rethink global operations in face of COVID-19 - study
Manufacturers must redesign and reform their Global Supply Chains or Global Production Networks (GPN) if they want to survive and prosper in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study reveals. The virus' impact demonstrates that global manufacturing concerns must switch from large production sites in a single location, such as China, to numerous smaller facilities around the world to reduce business risk.

Environment - Economics / Business - 09.06.2020
Accounting for nature in economies
Accounting for nature in economies
Gross Domestic Product, the standard metric for measuring national economies, doesn't account for the valuable services provided by nature. A new approach could help fill the gap. The way we measure economic health is flawed, according to new research from the Stanford-based Natural Capital Project. When we talk about a country's economic prosperity, we're almost always referring to gross domestic product, or GDP, a calculated value based on the goods and services that flow through an economy.

Economics / Business - Health - 02.06.2020
Slow easing of lockdowns may be better for global economy
A cautious approach to easing lockdown restrictions that reduces the risk of later lockdowns may be better for the global supply chain in the long run, according to a new modelling study led by UCL and Tsinghua University. The paper, published today in Nature Human Behaviour , is the first peer-reviewed study to comprehensively assess potential global supply chain effects of Covid-19 lockdowns, modelling the impact of lockdowns on 140 countries, including countries not directly affected by Covid-19.

Economics / Business - Health - 19.05.2020
Divorce drives early withdrawal from retirement accounts
Divorce drives early withdrawal from retirement accounts
Divorce-not buying granite countertops for a remodel-is what drives people to withdraw from their retirement funds well before they actually retire, according to a University of Michigan researcher. And mortgage payment distress is also a major factor-leading families to withdraw funds. Americans were most likely to access cash from their retirement accounts before they were retired during a divorce or after they lost a job, according to a working paper by economists Frank Stafford of U-M and Thomas Bridges of the University of Delaware.

Environment - Economics / Business - 05.05.2020
Long-term developments of energy pricing and consumption in industry
Long-term developments of energy pricing and consumption in industry
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have collaborated with British economists to study how energy consumption by Swiss industry develops depending on energy pricing. To this end, they examined in particular the prices and consumption of both electricity and natural gas over the past decades.

Environment - Economics / Business - 05.05.2020
Green policies essential for UK’s economic recovery
Green policies such as increasing use of renewable energy and investing in electric vehicles should be at the heart of Government recovery plans after the Covid-19 crisis, according to a briefing paper co-authored by Professor Paul Ekins (UCL Institute for Sustainable Resources). The document, put together by the COP26 Universities Network of which UCL is a member, draws on new research assessing the economic and climate impact of taking a green route out of the crisis.

Economics / Business - 05.05.2020
Finds stronger links between automation and inequality
This is part 3 of a three-part series examining the effects of robots and automation on employment, based on new research from economist and Institute Professor Daron Acemoglu.  Modern technology affects different workers in different ways. In some white-collar jobs - designer, engineer - people become more productive with sophisticated software at their side.

Economics / Business - 05.05.2020
Robots help some firms, even while workers across industries struggle
Study finds manufacturing companies that are quick to automate can thrive, but overall employment drops. This is part 2 of a three-part series examining the effects of robots and automation on employment, based on new research from economist and Institute Professor Daron Acemoglu.  Overall, adding robots to manufacturing reduces jobs - by more than three per robot, in fact.

Economics / Business - Microtechnics - 04.05.2020
How many jobs do robots really replace?
This is part 1 of a three-part series examining the effects of robots and automation on employment, based on new research from economist and Institute Professor Daron Acemoglu.   In many parts of the U.S., robots have been replacing workers over the last few decades. But to what extent, really? Some technologists have forecast that automation will lead to a future without work, while other observers have been more skeptical about such scenarios.

Economics / Business - 04.05.2020
Economic woes create more marital disagreements
Married couples argue with each other more about finances and other household matters as they cope with economic hardship from the global COVID-19 pandemic. But these outcomes are similar to what occurred more than a decade earlier, according to a new University of Michigan study that found economic hardships during the 2008 U.S. recession strained household finances and increased marital disagreements.

Economics / Business - 01.05.2020
Low income workers disproportionally affected by Covid-19
Low income workers in developing countries face a higher risk of income loss during the Covid-19 lockdown as it is less possible to conduct their jobs from home, suggests a new study from UCL, Bank of Thailand, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and GRIPS, Tokyo. The study, published in  Covid Economics: Vetted and Real-Time Papers , used Thailand as a case study but the findings are highly relevant for other countries with similar labour market structures - specifically, those with a large share of self-employment and low social safety net.

Health - Economics / Business - 29.04.2020
Economic damage could be worse without lockdown and social distancing - study
Economic damage could be worse without lockdown and social distancing - study
The worst thing for the economy would be not acting at all to prevent disease spread, followed by too short a lockdown, according to research based on US data. Taking no action is unacceptable from public health perspective, and extremely risky from an economic perspective Giancarlo Corsetti There is much debate over the economic costs of our lockdown lives: whether the price of disease mitigation is worth the risk of an enduring financial crisis.

Philosophy - Economics / Business - 29.04.2020
Memory misfires help selfish maintain their self-image
When people behave selfishly, they have a reliable ally to keep their self-image well-polished - their own memory. When asked to recall how generous they were in the past, selfish people tend to remember being more benevolent than they actually were, according to a series of experiments by Yale psychologists and economists at University of Zurich published April 29 Communications.

Economics / Business - Administration - 21.04.2020
Debt-laden firms are more likely to risk work safety: study
Debt-laden firms are more likely to risk work safety: study
New international research has found that cutting corners on workplace safety to boost short-term financial gains may be rife among companies burdened with debt. The researchers anticipate the problem will only worsen as the COVID-19 crisis smashes the world's economies.   Dr Di Fan from The Australian National University (ANU), who co-led the research, warned that Australian companies were susceptible to having a "myopic focus" at workers' expense.

Economics / Business - 21.04.2020
Women bear brunt of coronavirus economic shutdown in UK and US
Women bear brunt of coronavirus economic shutdown in UK and US
New data shows women and people who did not go to university are more likely to have lost work and earnings since mid-March. Of all those still employed, 32% of people in the UK and 37% of people in the US believe they will lose their jobs in the next few months Christopher Rauh Women on both sides of the Atlantic are more likely to have lost their jobs or suffered a fall in earnings since the coronavirus pandemic took hold - even after accounting for differences in types of occupation, a new study suggests.

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