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Electroengineering - Environment - 30.11.2020
Combining light and sound to see underwater
Combining light and sound to see underwater
The experimental Photoacoustic Airborne Sonar System setup in the lab (left). A Stanford "S" submerged beneath the water (middle) is reconstructed in 3D using reflected ultrasound waves (right). (Image credit: Aidan Fitzpatrick) The "Photoacoustic Airborne Sonar System" could be installed beneath drones to enable aerial underwater surveys and high-resolution mapping of the deep ocean.

Physics - Electroengineering - 23.11.2020
Controlling fully integrated nanodiamonds
Controlling fully integrated nanodiamonds
Using modern nanotechnology, it is possible nowadays to produce structures which have a feature sizes of just a few nanometres. This world of the most minute particles - also known as quantum systems - makes possible a wide range of technological applications, in fields which include magnetic field sensing, information processing, secure communication or ultra-precise time keeping.

Physics - Electroengineering - 09.11.2020
Combining electronic and photonic chips enables new record in super-fast quantum light detection
Combining electronic and photonic chips enables new record in super-fast quantum light detection
Bristol researchers have developed a tiny device that paves the way for higher performance quantum computers and quantum communications, making them significantly faster than the current state-of-the-art. Researchers from the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs (QET Labs) and Université Côte d‘Azur have made a new miniaturized light detector to measure quantum features of light in more detail than ever before.

Physics - Electroengineering - 09.11.2020
A new candidate material for Quantum Spin Liquids
A new candidate material for Quantum Spin Liquids
Using a unique material, EPFL scientists have been able to design and study an unusual state of matter, the Quantum Spin Liquid. The work has significant implications for future technologies, from quantum computing to superconductivity and spintronics. In 1973, physicist and later Nobel laureate Philip W. Anderson proposed a bizarre state of matter: the quantum spin liquid (QSL).

Electroengineering - Physics - 27.10.2020
Researchers break magnetic memory speed record
A microscope image of the structures used to initiate the magnetization switching. (Image by K. Jhuria) Spintronic devices are attractive alternatives to conventional computer chips, providing digital information storage that is highly energy efficient and also relatively easy to manufacture on a large scale.

Physics - Electroengineering - 19.10.2020
A trillion turns of light nets terahertz polarized bytes
A trillion turns of light nets terahertz polarized bytes
Nanophotonics researchers demonstrate ultrafast polarization switching U.S. and Italian engineers have demonstrated the first nanophotonic platform capable of manipulating polarized light 1 trillion times per second. "Polarized light can be used to encode bits of information, and we've shown it's possible to modulate such light at terahertz frequencies,” said Rice University's Alessandro Alabastri , co-corresponding author of a study published this week.

Electroengineering - Physics - 13.10.2020
Easy-to-make, ultra-low power electronics could charge out of thin air
Easy-to-make, ultra-low power electronics could charge out of thin air
Researchers have developed a new approach to printed electronics which allows ultra-low power electronic devices that could recharge from ambient light or radiofrequency noise. The approach paves the way for low-cost printed electronics that could be seamlessly embedded in everyday objects and environments.

Health - Electroengineering - 30.09.2020
3D printed 'invisible' fibres can sense breath, sound, and biological cells
3D printed ’invisible’ fibres can sense breath, sound, and biological cells
From capturing your breath to guiding biological cell movements, 3D printing of tiny, transparent conducting fibres could be used to make devices which can 'smell, hear and touch' - making it particularly useful for health monitoring, Internet of Things and biosensing applications.

Electroengineering - Life Sciences - 24.09.2020
Microelectronics shed light on neural behaviour
Microelectronics shed light on neural behaviour
Researchers at ETH Zurich - in collaboration with colleagues from EPFL in Lausanne and Harvard Medical School - have developed a system that allows them to optically stimulate individual nerve fibres in living mice. Through this process, they have demonstrated that the nervous system has a direct influence on the immune system.

Physics - Electroengineering - 24.09.2020
The Return of the Spin Echo
The Return of the Spin Echo
If the spins of phosphorus atoms in silicon are cleverly excited with microwave pulses, a so-called spin echo signal can be detected after a certain time. Surprisingly, this spin echo does not occur only once, but a whole series of echoes can be detected.

Physics - Electroengineering - 23.09.2020
CERN’s Large Hadron Collider Creates Matter From Light
Scientists on an experiment at the Large Hadron Collider see massive W particles emerging from collisions with electromagnetic fields. How can this happen? The ATLAS detector at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. (Credit: CERN) Note: This article was originally published by Symmetry magazine. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) plays with Albert Einstein's famous equation, E = mc², to transform matter into energy and then back into different forms of matter.

Physics - Electroengineering - 22.09.2020
Customising an electronic material
Customising an electronic material
Scientists have gained a fundamental understanding of a highly promising material that could be suited to future data storage applications. Their experiments with strontium-iridium oxide, Sr2IrO 4 , investigated both the magnetic and electronic properties of the material as a thin film. They also analysed how these properties can be systematically controlled by manipulating the films.

Physics - Electroengineering - 14.09.2020
Physicists Discover New Magnetoelectric Effect
Physicists Discover New Magnetoelectric Effect
In a very unusual way, the electrical and magnetic properties of a particular crystal are linked together - the phenomenon was discovered and explained at TU Wien (Vienna). Electricity and magnetism are closely related: Power lines generate a magnetic field, rotating magnets in a generator produce electricity.

Electroengineering - Environment - 10.09.2020
Transistor-integrated cooling for a more powerful chip
Transistor-integrated cooling for a more powerful chip
Researchers have created a single chip that combines a transistor and micro-fluidic cooling system. Managing the heat generated in electronics is a huge problem, especially with the constant push to reduce the size and pack as many transistors as possible in the same chip. The whole problem is how to manage such high heat fluxes efficiently.

Physics - Electroengineering - 07.09.2020
A tiny instrument to measure the faintest magnetic fields
A tiny instrument to measure the faintest magnetic fields
Physicists at the University of Basel have developed a minuscule instrument able to detect extremely faint magnetic fields. At the heart of the superconducting quantum interference device are two atomically thin layers of graphene, which the researchers combined with boron nitride. Instruments like this one have applications in areas such as medicine, besides being used to research new materials.

Physics - Electroengineering - 07.09.2020
Reconfiguring microwave photonic filters without an external device
Reconfiguring microwave photonic filters without an external device
Researchers from EPFL's Photonics Systems Lab have come up with a way of reconfiguring microwave photonic filters without the need for an external device. This paves the way for more compact, environmentally friendly filters that will be more practical and cheaper to use. Potential applications include detection and communications systems.

Computer Science - Electroengineering - 27.08.2020
Brain-inspired electronic system could vastly reduce AI’s carbon footprint
Extremely energy-efficient artificial intelligence is now closer to reality after a study by UCL researchers found a way to improve the accuracy of a brain-inspired computing system. The system, which uses memristors to create artificial neural networks, is at least 1,000 times more energy efficient than conventional transistor-based AI hardware, but has until now been more prone to error.

Materials Science - Electroengineering - 19.08.2020
Toward an Ultrahigh Energy Density Capacitor
Toward an Ultrahigh Energy Density Capacitor
By introducing defects to a common material, Berkeley Lab researchers create a highly efficient capacitor with dramatically increased energy density Capacitors that rapidly store and release electric energy are key components in modern electronics and power systems. However, the most commonly used ones have low energy densities compared to other storage systems like batteries or fuel cells, which in turn cannot discharge and recharge rapidly without sustaining damage.

Physics - Electroengineering - 18.08.2020
Artificial materials for more efficient electronics
Artificial materials for more efficient electronics
The discovery of an unprecedented physical effect in a new artificial material marks a significant milestone in the lengthy process of developing "made-to-order" materials and more energy-efficient electronics. We are surrounded by electronic devices. Transistors are used to power telephones, computers, televisions, hi-fi systems and game consoles as well as cars, airplanes and the like.

Life Sciences - Electroengineering - 17.08.2020
Shock to bacteria activates nature's electrical grid
Shock to bacteria activates nature’s electrical grid
The ocean floor and the ground beneath our feet are riddled with tiny nanowires - 1/100,000 the width of a human hair - created by billions of bacteria that can generate electric currents from organic waste. In new research published Aug. 17 Chemical Biology, Yale researchers describe how this hidden power grid could be activated with a short jolt of electric field.  " We live in an electric world," said  Nikhil Malvankar , assistant professor of molecular biophysics and biochemistry at the Microbial Science Institute at Yale's West Campus and senior author of the paper.
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