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Physics - Electroengineering - 14.09.2020
Physicists Discover New Magnetoelectric Effect
Physicists Discover New Magnetoelectric Effect
In a very unusual way, the electrical and magnetic properties of a particular crystal are linked together - the phenomenon was discovered and explained at TU Wien (Vienna). Electricity and magnetism are closely related: Power lines generate a magnetic field, rotating magnets in a generator produce electricity.

Electroengineering - Environment - 10.09.2020
Transistor-integrated cooling for a more powerful chip
Transistor-integrated cooling for a more powerful chip
Researchers have created a single chip that combines a transistor and micro-fluidic cooling system. Managing the heat generated in electronics is a huge problem, especially with the constant push to reduce the size and pack as many transistors as possible in the same chip. The whole problem is how to manage such high heat fluxes efficiently.

Physics - Electroengineering - 07.09.2020
A tiny instrument to measure the faintest magnetic fields
A tiny instrument to measure the faintest magnetic fields
Physicists at the University of Basel have developed a minuscule instrument able to detect extremely faint magnetic fields. At the heart of the superconducting quantum interference device are two atomically thin layers of graphene, which the researchers combined with boron nitride. Instruments like this one have applications in areas such as medicine, besides being used to research new materials.

Physics - Electroengineering - 07.09.2020
Reconfiguring microwave photonic filters without an external device
Reconfiguring microwave photonic filters without an external device
Researchers from EPFL's Photonics Systems Lab have come up with a way of reconfiguring microwave photonic filters without the need for an external device. This paves the way for more compact, environmentally friendly filters that will be more practical and cheaper to use. Potential applications include detection and communications systems.

Computer Science - Electroengineering - 27.08.2020
Brain-inspired electronic system could vastly reduce AI’s carbon footprint
Extremely energy-efficient artificial intelligence is now closer to reality after a study by UCL researchers found a way to improve the accuracy of a brain-inspired computing system. The system, which uses memristors to create artificial neural networks, is at least 1,000 times more energy efficient than conventional transistor-based AI hardware, but has until now been more prone to error.

Materials Science - Electroengineering - 19.08.2020
Toward an Ultrahigh Energy Density Capacitor
Toward an Ultrahigh Energy Density Capacitor
By introducing defects to a common material, Berkeley Lab researchers create a highly efficient capacitor with dramatically increased energy density Capacitors that rapidly store and release electric energy are key components in modern electronics and power systems. However, the most commonly used ones have low energy densities compared to other storage systems like batteries or fuel cells, which in turn cannot discharge and recharge rapidly without sustaining damage.

Physics - Electroengineering - 18.08.2020
Artificial materials for more efficient electronics
Artificial materials for more efficient electronics
The discovery of an unprecedented physical effect in a new artificial material marks a significant milestone in the lengthy process of developing "made-to-order" materials and more energy-efficient electronics. We are surrounded by electronic devices. Transistors are used to power telephones, computers, televisions, hi-fi systems and game consoles as well as cars, airplanes and the like.

Life Sciences - Electroengineering - 17.08.2020
Shock to bacteria activates nature's electrical grid
Shock to bacteria activates nature’s electrical grid
The ocean floor and the ground beneath our feet are riddled with tiny nanowires - 1/100,000 the width of a human hair - created by billions of bacteria that can generate electric currents from organic waste. In new research published Aug. 17 Chemical Biology, Yale researchers describe how this hidden power grid could be activated with a short jolt of electric field.  " We live in an electric world," said  Nikhil Malvankar , assistant professor of molecular biophysics and biochemistry at the Microbial Science Institute at Yale's West Campus and senior author of the paper.

Physics - Electroengineering - 06.08.2020
Efficient valves for electron spins
Efficient valves for electron spins
Researchers at the University of Basel in collaboration with colleagues from Pisa have developed a new concept that uses the electron spin to switch an electrical current. In addition to fundamental research, such spin valves are also the key elements in spintronics - a type of electronics that exploits the spin instead of the charge of electrons.

Physics - Electroengineering - 15.07.2020
Shaking light with sound
Shaking light with sound
Combining integrated photonics and MEMS technology, scientists from EPFL and Purdue University demonstrate monolithic piezoelectric control of integrated optical frequency combs with bulk acoustic waves. The technology opens up integrated ultrafast acousto-optic modulation for demanding applications.

Materials Science - Electroengineering - 13.07.2020
New Materials for Extra Thin Computer Chips
New Materials for Extra Thin Computer Chips
For a long time, something important has been neglected in electronics: If you want to make electronic components smaller and smaller, you also need the right insulator materials. Ever smaller and ever more compact - this is the direction in which computer chips are developing, driven by industry. This is why so-called 2D materials are considered to be the great hope: they are as thin as a material can possibly be, in extreme cases they consist of only one single layer of atoms.

Physics - Electroengineering - 08.07.2020
Scaling up the quantum chip
Scaling up the quantum chip
MIT engineers develop a hybrid process that connects photonics with "artificial atoms," to produce the largest quantum chip of its type. MIT researchers have developed a process to manufacture and integrate "artificial atoms," created by atomic-scale defects in microscopically thin slices of diamond, with photonic circuitry, producing the largest quantum chip of its type.

Electroengineering - 03.07.2020
A completely new plasmonic chip for ultrafast data transmission using light
A completely new plasmonic chip for ultrafast data transmission using light
Researchers have built an ultrafast chip that can speed up data transmission in fibre optic networks. The chip combines several innovations at the same time and, given the growing demand for streaming and online services, represents a significant development.

Materials Science - Electroengineering - 02.07.2020
The lightest shielding material in the world
The lightest shielding material in the world
Researchers have succeeded in applying aerogels to microelectronics: Aerogels based on cellulose nanofibers can effectively shield electromagnetic radiation over a wide frequency range - and they are unrivalled in terms of weight. Electric motors and electronic devices generate electromagnetic fields that sometimes have to be shielded in order not to affect neighboring electronic components or the transmission of signals.

Electroengineering - Computer Science - 29.06.2020
Wearable-tech glove translates sign language into speech in real time
UCLA bioengineers have designed a glove-like device that can translate American Sign Language into English speech in real time though a smartphone app. The ir research is published Electronics. “Our hope is that this opens up an easy way for people who use sign language to communicate directly with non-signers without needing someone else to translate for them,? said Jun Chen, an assistant professor of bioengineering at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering and the principal investigator on the research.

Physics - Electroengineering - 29.06.2020
A new theory for Semiconductors made of nanocrystals
A new theory for Semiconductors made of nanocrystals
Researchers have provided the first theoretical explanation for how electrical current is conducted in semiconductors made of nanocrystals. In the future, this could lead to the development of new sensors, lasers or LEDs for TV screens. A few years ago, we were introduced to TV screens featuring QLED technology that produces brilliant colours.

Electroengineering - Computer Science - 22.06.2020
New technique may enable all-optical data-centre networks
A new technique that synchronises the clocks of computers in under a billionth of a second can eliminate one of the hurdles for the deployment of all-optical networks, potentially leading to more efficient data centres, according to a new study led by UCL and Microsoft. Data centres, comprising tens or hundreds of thousands connected servers, are the underlying technology empowering everything we do online, from storing films and photos to serving up webpages and online services.

Electroengineering - Physics - 22.06.2020
Critical communications component made on a flexible wooden film
In the not-too-distant future, flexible electronics will open the door to new products like foldable phones, tablets that can be rolled, paper-thin displays and wearable sensors that monitor health data. Developing these new bendy products, however, means using materials like new plastics and thin films to replace the rigid circuit boards and bulky electronic components that currently occupy the interiors of cell phones and other gadgets.

Electroengineering - Environment - 18.06.2020
Electricity for All
Organizations like the World Bank imply that equality is an important aspect of their goals for expanding electricity access in developing countries. Yet few studies have actually addressed how to ensure equality in developing areas like sub-Saharan Africa, and many have even used methods that further inequality.

Physics - Electroengineering - 11.06.2020
Macroscopic quantum interference in an ultra-pure metal
Macroscopic quantum interference in an ultra-pure metal
That visible light holds the character of a wave can be demonstrated in simple optics experiments, or directly witnessed when rainbows appear in the sky. Although the subtle laws of quantum mechanics, that is, wave mechanics, ultimately govern all the processes of electron transportelectrons in solids, their wave-like nature of the electrons is not often apparent to the casual observer.

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