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Environment - Social Sciences - 01.10.2020
Analysis: Rising sea levels could leave millions at risk by 2100
Analysis: Rising sea levels could leave millions at risk by 2100
Ilan Kelman (UCL Institute for Risk & Disaster Reduction) joins experts in examining 33 studies of how rising sea levels will affect migration patterns, 'trapped populations' and call for policymakers to institute measures to protect residents living in high-risk areas. An article in 2011 shocked many by suggesting that up to 187 million people could be forced to leave their homes as a result of two metres of sea level rise by 2100.

Life Sciences - Environment - 01.10.2020
Alien species to increase by 36% worldwide by 2050
Alien species to increase by 36% worldwide by 2050
The number of alien (non-native) species, particularly insects, arthropods and birds, is expected to increase globally by 36% by the middle of this century, compared to 2005, finds new research by an international team involving UCL. Published in Global Change Biology, the study also predicts the arrival of around 2,500 new alien species in Europe, which translates to an increase of 64% for the continent over the 45-year period.

Environment - Life Sciences - 01.10.2020
Pattern in whale songs predicts migration
Pattern in whale songs predicts migration
Through the use of two advanced audio recording technologies, a collaboration of Monterey Bay researchers has found that blue whales switch from nighttime to daytime singing when they are starting to migrate. Image of hydrophone deployment on the seafloor, with the hydrophone stand still in the grip of the robotic hand of a remotely operated vehicle.

Environment - Physics - 01.10.2020
Climate: Iodic acid influences cloud formation at the North Pole
Climate: Iodic acid influences cloud formation at the North Pole
An international team of scientists from EPFL, the Paul Scherrer Institute and Stockholm University has identified a novel driver of new aerosol particle formation in the Arctic during the summer to fall transition. The authors show that iodic acid is important for forming new particles which subsequently influence the formation of clouds and their radiative effect over the Arctic pack ice.

Environment - 01.10.2020
Two's a crowd: Nuclear and renewables don't mix. Only the latter can deliver truly low carbon energy says new study
Two’s a crowd: Nuclear and renewables don’t mix. Only the latter can deliver truly low carbon energy says new study
Onshore wind farm image courtesy of Envision Energy. If countries want to lower emissions as substantially, rapidly and cost-effectively as possible, they should prioritize support for renewables, rather than nuclear power. That's the finding of new analysis of 123 countries over 25 years by the University of Sussex Business School and the ISM International School of Management which reveals that nuclear energy programmes around the world tend not to deliver sufficient carbon emission reductions and so should not be considered an effective low carbon energy source.

Environment - 30.09.2020
Impact of large-scale tree death on carbon storage
Largescale ‘disturbances', including fires, harvesting, windstorms and insect outbreaks, which kill large patches of forest, are responsible for more than a tenth of tree death worldwide, according to new research at the University of Birmingham. The research also showed wide regional variation, with parts of Scandinavia, the USA, Canada and Russia having a particularly high frequency of these disturbances.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 30.09.2020
Greenland is on track to lose ice faster than in any century over the past 12,000 years
Greenland is on track to lose ice faster than in any century over the past 12,000 years
An aerial view of the edge of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Jason Briner/University at Buffalo If human societies don't sharply curb emissions of greenhouse gases, Greenland's rate of ice loss this century is likely to greatly outpace that of any century over the past 12,000 years, a new study concludes. University of Washington scientists are among the authors of the study published Sept.

Health - Environment - 29.09.2020
Many ventilation systems may increase risk of COVID-19 exposure
Many ventilation systems may increase risk of COVID-19 exposure
Ventilation systems in many modern office buildings, which are designed to keep temperatures comfortable and increase energy efficiency, may increase the risk of exposure to the coronavirus, particularly during the coming winter, according to research published in the Journal of Fluid Mechanics .

Materials Science - Environment - 29.09.2020
Filtering radioactive elements from water
Filtering radioactive elements from water
Some time ago, ETH researchers developed a filter membrane made out of whey proteins and activated carbon. In a new study, they now demonstrate just how efficient this membrane is at filtering radioactive elements from contaminated water. The nuclear accident in Fukushima remains etched into people's memories.

Environment - 28.09.2020
Throwing a warm sheet over our understanding of ice and climate
Temperatures at Earth's highest latitudes were nearly as warm after Antarctica's polar ice sheets developed as they were prior to glaciation, according to a new study led by Yale University. The finding upends most scientists' basic understanding of how ice and climate develop over long stretches of time.

Politics - Environment - 28.09.2020
The 2020 U.S. election, issues and challenges
From addressing how to vote safely during a pandemic to tackling disinformation and misinformation on social media, Stanford scholars examine the issues and uncertainties facing American voters as they cast their ballot in November's general election.

Environment - 28.09.2020
Artificial Intellegence Can Help Protect Orchids
Artificial Intellegence Can Help Protect Orchids
Orchids may be decorative, but many orchid species are also threatened by land conversion and illegal harvesting. However, only a fraction of those species are included in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, because assessments require a lot of time, resources and expertise. A new approach, an automated assessment developed under the lead of biodiversity researchers from Central Germany, now shows that almost 30 per cent of all orchid species are possibly threatened.

Environment - 28.09.2020
Hand pollination, not agrochemicals, increases cocoa yield and farmer income
Hand pollination, not agrochemicals, increases cocoa yield and farmer income
Agroecologists from Göttingen University compare pesticides, fertilisers, manual pollination and farming costs in Indonesia Cocoa is in great demand on the world market, but there are many different ways to increase production. A research team from the University of Göttingen has now investigated the relative importance of the use of pesticides, fertilisers and manual pollination in a well replicated field trial in Indonesian agroforestry systems.

Environment - 28.09.2020
Disastrous duo: heatwaves and droughts
Simultaneous heatwaves and droughts are becoming increasingly common in western parts of the United States, according to a new study led by researchers from McGill University. Periods of dry and hot weather, which can make wildfires more likely, are becoming larger, more intense, and more frequent because of climate change.

Environment - 28.09.2020
Ocean water could melt precarious Antarctic glacier
Ocean water could melt precarious Antarctic glacier
Rice helps study threats to Thwaites, a glacier that could add 25 inches to sea level Rice University researchers, alumni and staff are part of an international effort that has discovered a pathway for warm ocean water to melt the underside of Thwaites Glacier, a precarious body of west Antarctic ice that could add as much as 25 inches to global sea level if it were to suffer a runaway collapse.

Environment - 28.09.2020
Protection needed for emerging mining hotspots
Growing demand for metals necessary for the transition to a low carbon future will lead to more mining in high-risk areas, according to University of Queensland research. Dr Éléonore Lčbre and researchers from UQ's Sustainable Minerals Institute identified mining ‘hotspots' by looking at areas where competition over mining resources such as water and land is likely to negatively impact surrounding communities.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 25.09.2020
Tree rings show scale of Arctic pollution is worse than previously thought
Tree rings show scale of Arctic pollution is worse than previously thought
The largest-ever study of tree rings from Norilsk in the Russian Arctic has shown that the direct and indirect effects of industrial pollution in the region and beyond are far worse than previously thought.

Environment - Life Sciences - 24.09.2020
Marine heatwaves are human made
Marine heatwaves are human made
Heatwaves in the world's oceans have become over 20 times more frequent due to human influence. This is what researchers from the Oeschger Centre for Climate Research at the University of Bern are now able to prove. Marine heatwaves destroy ecosystems and damage fisheries. A marine heatwave (ocean heatwave) is an extended period of time in which the water temperature in a particular ocean region is abnormally high.

Environment - 24.09.2020
Newly identified 'landfalling droughts' start over ocean
Newly identified ’landfalling droughts’ start over ocean
Researchers have identified a new type of "landfalling drought" that originates over the ocean before traveling onto land, and which can cause larger, drier conditions than other droughts. Meteorologists track hurricanes over the oceans, forecasting where and when landfall might occur so residents can prepare for disaster before it strikes.

Innovation - Environment - 24.09.2020
Styrian technological innovation: The smallest particle sensor in the world - made in Graz
Styrian technological innovation: The smallest particle sensor in the world - made in Graz
TU Graz, ams and Silicon Austria Labs has developed a compact and energy-efficient sensor for mobile devices, which informs users in real time about the fine dust content in the air and warns them in case of elevated values. The prototype of the particle sensor (black square in the middle of the board) developed at TU Graz compared in size with a one-cent coin.

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