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Results 61 - 80 of 587.


Earth Sciences - Environment - 24.09.2020
How earthquake swarms arise
A new fault simulator maps out how interactions between pressure, friction and fluids rising through a fault zone can lead to slow-motion quakes and seismic swarms. Earthquakes can be abrupt bursts of home-crumbling, ground-buckling energy when slices of the planet's crust long held in place by friction suddenly slip and lurch.

Environment - Life Sciences - 24.09.2020
Fire and logging reduce homes for threatened mammals
Fire and logging reduce homes for threatened mammals
Fire and logging are substantially reducing the number of hollow-bearing trees that threatened and critically endangered Australian mammals can use as homes, a new study from The Australian National University (ANU) warns.  The findings come as the number of Australian mammals which live and nest in tree hollows is also declining.   The study used information from 158 sites collected at regular intervals since 1997.   It found a direct relationship between the number of hollow-bearing trees in an area and the number of possums and gliders living there.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 23.09.2020
Solving the Strange Storms on Jupiter
At the south pole of Jupiter lurks a striking sight-even for a gas giant planet covered in colorful bands that sports a red spot larger than the earth. Down near the south pole of the planet, mostly hidden from the prying eyes of humans, is a collection of swirling storms arranged in an unusually geometric pattern.

Environment - 23.09.2020
More effective monitoring of air quality
More effective monitoring of air quality
Air quality in Switzerland has improved but is still not good enough. To continue the monitoring of air pollutants which has taken place for many years in Dübendorf, canton Zurich, federal government has opened a new station as part of its National Air Pollution Monitoring Network (NABEL). As well as showing whether air pollution control measures are working, it will also be used as a platform for research activities on new measuring equipment or new air pollutants.

Environment - Health - 23.09.2020
Viruses could become harder to kill
Viruses could become harder to kill
A recent EPFL study shows that pathogenic viruses may be able to develop resistance to warm temperatures and some types of disinfectant. That - combined with global warming and more frequent and longer heat waves - could make it even harder to keep them from spreading.  We could soon see the day when people have to think twice before taking a swim in lakes hitherto considered healthy.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 23.09.2020
Could Life Exist Deep Underground on Mars?
Recent science missions and results are bringing the search for life closer to home, and scientists at the Center for Astrophysics Harvard & Smithsonian (CfA) and the Florida Institute of Technology (FIT) may have figured out how to determine whether life is-or was-lurking deep beneath the surface of Mars, the Moon, and other rocky objects in the universe.

Life Sciences - Environment - 23.09.2020
Genome Duplications as Evolutionary Adaptation Strategy
Genome duplications play a major role in the development of forms and structures of plant organisms and their changes across long periods of evolution. Heidelberg University biologists under the direction of Marcus Koch made this discovery in their research of the Brassicaceae family. To determine the scope of the different variations over 30 million years, they analysed all 4,000 species of this plant family and investigated at the genus level their morphological diversity with respect to all their characteristic traits.

Environment - 22.09.2020
Optical Wi-Fi allows for ultrafast underwater communications
EPFL spin-off Hydromea has developed a miniature optical modem that can operate down to 6,000 meters below the ocean's surface. It is sensitive enough to collect data at very high speeds from sources more than 50 meters away. If you want to use a connected device underwater, you don't have many options.

Environment - 22.09.2020
Ecologists confirm Alan Turing's theory for Australian fairy circles
Ecologists confirm Alan Turing’s theory for Australian fairy circles
International research team led by Göttingen University shows patterned vegetation regenerates by -ecosystem engineering- of the grasses Fairy circles are one of nature's greatest enigmas and most visually stunning phenomena. An international research team led by the University of Göttingen has now, for the first time, collected detailed data to show that Alan Turing's model explains the striking vegetation patterns of the Australian fairy circles.

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.09.2020
Biodiversity hypothesis called into question
Biodiversity hypothesis called into question
The trade-off between gleaners and exploiters does not explain the diversity of biological species in the way that scientists expected. Our understanding of biodiversity has to change. Aquatic organisms - and terrestrial ones - that do best when there is lots of food also do best when there is very little .

Chemistry - Environment - 21.09.2020
Better catalysts for a sustainable bioeconomy
Better catalysts for a sustainable bioeconomy
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and from ETH Zurich want to make so-called zeolites more efficient. Today, these compounds are already indispensable additives in the chemical industry and have been used as catalysts in oil refineries since the 1960s. Now, , the researchers advocate paying more attention to the classic zeolites.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 21.09.2020
First 'ultrahot Neptune': one of nature's improbable planets
First ’ultrahot Neptune’: one of nature’s improbable planets
An international team of astronomers, including researchers from the University of Cambridge, has discovered a new class of planet, an 'ultrahot Neptune', orbiting the nearby star LTT 9779. This planet is particularly exciting because of its peculiarity: how did this planet come to arrive on such a short period orbit and why does it still possess an atmosphere? Ed Gillen The planet orbits so close to its star that its year lasts only 19 hours, and stellar radiation heats the planet to over 1700 degrees Celsius.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 18.09.2020
Undersea Earthquakes Shake Up Climate Science
Despite climate change being most obvious to people as unseasonably warm winter days or melting glaciers, as much as 95 percent of the extra heat trapped on Earth by greenhouse gases is held in the world's oceans. For that reason, monitoring the temperature of ocean waters has been a priority for climate scientists, and now Caltech researchers have discovered that seismic rumblings on the seafloor can provide them with another tool for doing that.

Environment - Materials Science - 17.09.2020
Effective Pathway to Convert Greenhouse Gas into Valuable Products
A research team from Caltech and the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering has demonstrated a promising way to efficiently convert carbon dioxide into ethylene-an important chemical used to produce plastics, solvents, cosmetics, and other important products globally. The scientists developed nanoscale copper wires with specially shaped surfaces to catalyze a chemical reaction that reduces greenhouse gas emissions while simultaneously generating ethylene-a valuable chemical.

Environment - Paleontology - 16.09.2020
Discovery of a new mass extinction
Discovery of a new mass extinction
Summary of major extinction events through time, highlighting the new, Carnian Pluvial Episode at 233 million years ago. © D. Bonadonna/ MUSE, Trento. 16 September 2020 It's not often a new mass extinction is identified; after all, such events were so devastating they really stand out in the fossil record.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 16.09.2020
Most landslides in western Oregon triggered by heavy rainfall, not big earthquakes
Most landslides in western Oregon triggered by heavy rainfall, not big earthquakes
Researchers at the University of Washington, Portland State University and the University of Oregon have shown that deep-seated landslides in the central Oregon Coast Range are triggered mostly by rainfall, not by large offshore earthquakes. The open-access paper was published Sept. 16 in Science Advances.

Environment - Life Sciences - 16.09.2020
Marine animals live where ocean is most 'breathable,' but ranges could shrink with climate change
Marine animals live where ocean is most ’breathable,’ but ranges could shrink with climate change
As oceans warm due to climate change, scientists are trying to predict how marine animals - from backboned fish to spineless jellyfish - will react. Laboratory experiments indicate that many could theoretically tolerate temperatures far higher than what they encounter today. But these studies don't mean that marine animals can maintain their current ranges in warmer oceans, according to Curtis Deutsch , an associate professor of oceanography at the University of Washington.

Environment - 15.09.2020
Reforestation can only partially restore tropical soils
Research team from Göttingen and the USA investigates subsoil in deforested forest areas Tropical forest soils play a crucial role in providing vital ecosystem functions. They provide nutrients for plants, store carbon and regulate greenhouse gases, as well as storing and filtering water, and protection against erosion.

Environment - 14.09.2020
Mediterranean and tropical biodiversity most vulnerable to human pressures
Mediterranean and tropical biodiversity most vulnerable to human pressures
Animals in tropical and Mediterranean areas are the most sensitive to climate change and land use pressures, finds a new study by UCL researchers. The findings, published today in Nature Ecology & Evolution , show how extinction risks are not evenly distributed worldwide, and suggest that large declines in tropical biodiversity are likely to occur imminently.

Environment - 14.09.2020
Satellite images display changes in the condition of European forests
Satellite images display changes in the condition of European forests
Newly created map indicates openings in the European forest canopy The forest canopy (the closed vegetation cover consisting of treetops) is rapidly declining according to a research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna.

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