news 2020

« BACK

Life Sciences



Results 1 - 20 of 68.
1 2 3 4 Next »


Life Sciences - 23.01.2020
Large marine parks can save sharks from overfishing threat
Large marine parks can save sharks from overfishing threat
‘No-take' marine reserves - where fishing is banned - can reverse the decline in the world's coral reef shark populations caused by overfishing, according to an Australian study. But University of Queensland, James Cook University (JCU) and University of Tasmania researchers found that existing marine reserves need to be much larger to be effective against overfishing.

Life Sciences - 23.01.2020
Brilliant iridescence can conceal as well as attract
A new study shows for the first time that the striking iridescent colours seen in some animals increase their chances of survival against predators by acting as a means of camouflage. Rather than reveal it seems these dynamically changing shades are used to conceal, according to the University of Bristol study published today [23 January] in Current Biology.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.01.2020
Researchers reconstruct 500 million years of insect evolution
Researchers reconstruct 500 million years of insect evolution
Arthropods, a group of animals including next to insects also spiders or crustaceans, make up the most species-rich and diverse group of animals on Earth, with numerous adaptations that have allowed them to exploit all major ecosystems. However, what genetic mechanisms are responsible for their great evolutionary success' A team of international researchers studied now these species and tracked the evolutionary origin of key adaptations.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.01.2020
Printing objects that can incorporate living organisms
A 3D printing system that controls the behavior of live bacteria could someday enable medical devices with therapeutic agents built in. The technique may lead to 3D printing of biomedical tools, such as customized braces, that incorporate living cells to produce therapeutic compunds such as painkillers or topical treatments, the researchers say.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.01.2020
Surprise discovery shakes up our understanding of gene expression
A group of University of Chicago scientists has uncovered a previously unknown way that our genes are made into reality. Rather than directions going one-way from DNA to RNA to proteins, the latest study shows that RNA itself modulates how DNA is transcribed-using a chemical process that is increasingly apparent to be vital to biology.

Environment - Life Sciences - 22.01.2020
Fungal diversity and the future of forests
Stanford researchers predict that climate change will reduce the diversity of symbiotic fungi that help trees grow. If you indulge in truffles, or porcini and chanterelle mushrooms, you have enjoyed a product of ectomycorrhizal fungi. Forming symbiotic relationships with plants - including pine, birch, oak and willow tree species - these fungi have existed for millions of years, their sprawling filaments supporting ecosystems throughout their reach.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.01.2020
Possible Parkinson’s treatment successfully targets two major nerve systems
Scientists have discovered that a non-invasive technique which could one day be used to treat Parkinson's disease, can successfully target a highly specific group of brain cells which play a key role in development of the condition. In 2015, scientists demonstrated that a form of gene therapy could target and stimulate a group of nerve cells affected by the disease, called cholinergic neurons.

Environment - Life Sciences - 22.01.2020
Urine fertilizer: ’Aging’ effectively protects against transfer of antibiotic resistance
Recycled and aged human urine can be used as a fertilizer with low risks of transferring antibiotic resistant DNA to the environment, according to new research from the University of Michigan. It's a key finding in efforts to identify more sustainable alternatives to widely used fertilizers that contribute to water pollution.

Life Sciences - 21.01.2020
Mosquitoes are drawn to flowers as much as people - and now scientists know why
Mosquitoes are drawn to flowers as much as people - and now scientists know why
Without their keen sense of smell, mosquitoes wouldn't get very far. They rely on this sense to find a host to bite and spots to lay eggs. And without that sense of smell, mosquitoes could not locate their dominant source of food: nectar from flowers. "Nectar is an important source of food for all mosquitoes," said Jeffrey Riffell , a professor of biology at the University of Washington.

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.01.2020
Small predators lose out from human land use
Predators, especially small invertebrates like spiders and ladybirds, are the most likely to be lost when natural habitats are converted to agricultural land or towns and cities, finds a new UCL-led study. The first of its kind, global study on the impacts of human land use on different groups of animals is published in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology .

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 21.01.2020
Reconstructing structure and function of a neuronal circuit
Reconstructing structure and function of a neuronal circuit
Reconstructing structure and function of a neuronal circuit The function of neuronal circuits is thought to be determined largely by specific connections between neurons. But this assumption has been difficult to test because the reconstruction of the synaptic connectivity of a neuronal circuit - its "wiring diagram" - is a major challenge.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.01.2020
Cardiac and visual degeneration arrested by a food supplement
Cardiac and visual degeneration arrested by a food supplement
UNIGE researchers have discovered a new gene that causes blindness and cardiomyopathy. They have also managed to halt the progression of eye disease and treat cardiac disease by administering a food supplement. Our genome consists of 20,000 genes, all of which may be capable of triggering disease. It is estimated that there are 7,000 unknown genes that cause recessive genetic diseases resulting from mutations in two copies of a gene that have been inherited from each parent.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.01.2020
Sepsis associated with 1 in 5 deaths
Sepsis associated with 1 in 5 deaths
Twice as many people as previously believed are dying of sepsis worldwide, according to an analysis published in The Lancet . Among them are a disproportionately high number of children in poor areas. Led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and University of Washington schools of medicine, the study revealed 48.9 million global cases of sepsis in 2017 and 11 million deaths, representing 1 in 5 deaths worldwide.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 20.01.2020
A chronicle of giant straight-tusked elephants
A chronicle of giant straight-tusked elephants
About 800,000 years ago, the giant straight-tusked elephant Palaeoloxodon migrated out of Africa and became widespread across Europe and Asia. It divided into many species, with distinct types in Japan, Central Asia and Europe — even some dwarf forms as large as a small donkey on some Mediterranean islands.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.01.2020
Why we differ in our ability to fight off gut infections
Why we differ in our ability to fight off gut infections
Scientists at EPFL have published two papers showing how genetics affects the ability of different individuals to fight off gut infections. ?he ability of the immune system to fight off bacterial, viral and other invading agents in the gut differs between individuals. However, the biological mechanism by which this happens is not well understood, but at least part of this difference may be explained by genetic factors.

Life Sciences - Environment - 16.01.2020
Scientists uncover how an explosion of new genes explain the origin of land plants
Scientists have made a significant discovery about the genetic origins of how plants evolved from living in water to land 470 million years ago. The new study, led by scientists from the universities of Bristol and Essex and published today [16 January] in Current Biology , challenge the established view of the origin of plants on land, and reveal that compared to the origin of animals, plants are better at inventing new genes during periods of evolution.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.01.2020
Latest tech in clinical grafts' A 'universal' blood vessel
Latest tech in clinical grafts’ A ’universal’ blood vessel
Yale doctors have developed a way to create vascular grafts from stem cells that are as strong as the original blood vessels they would replace. The advance, demonstrated in an animal model, may lead to bioengineered grafts suitable for transplant into any human patient using universally compatible cell lines, said the researchers.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.01.2020
Mosquitoes Engineered to Repel Dengue Virus
Researchers develop the first mosquitoes synthetically designed to neutralize many types of the widespread infectious disease An international team of scientists has synthetically engineered mosquitoes that halt the transmission of the dengue virus. Led by biologists at the University of California San Diego, the research team describes details of the achievement in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the insects that spread dengue in humans, on January 16 in the journal PLOS Pathogens .

Life Sciences - 16.01.2020
Giant squid’s full genome revealed, providing clues about mysterious creature
The monstrous giant squid, which can grow to the size of a school bus with eyes as big as dinner plates, is rarely sighted and has never been caught and kept alive-meaning its biology (even how they reproduce) is still largely a mystery. But science just took a huge step forward with the publication of the squid's full genome sequence.

Life Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 16.01.2020
Artificial intelligence used to predict 3D structure of proteins
A deep learning system can predict the structure of a protein using its genetic sequence more accurately than any previous modelling system, according to a study by researchers at DeepMind and UCL. Nearly every function our body performs relies on proteins. Predicting the intricate 3D structure of a protein is important because its structure largely determines its function and, once the structure is known, scientists can develop drugs that target this unique shape.
1 2 3 4 Next »

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |