news 2020

« BACK

Life Sciences



Results 1 - 20 of 328.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 17 Next »


Life Sciences - 02.04.2020
Stress disrupts our ability to plan ahead
Pairing brain scans with virtual-navigation tasks, researchers found that people make less efficient and effective plans when stressed. New research from Stanford University has found that stress can hinder our ability to develop informed plans by preventing us from being able to make decisions based on memory.

Life Sciences - 02.04.2020
Natural sunscreen gene influences how we make vitamin D
Genetic variations in the skin can create a natural sunscreen, according to University of Queensland researchers investigating the genes linked with vitamin D. Professor John McGrath from UQ's Queensland Brain Institute said this was one of a number of ways vitamin D affected the body identified in a collaborative study that looked at the genomes of more than half a million people from the United Kingdom.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.04.2020
Our oceans are suffering, but we can rebuild marine life
Our oceans are suffering, but we can rebuild marine life
It's not too late to rescue global marine life, according to a study outlining the steps needed for marine ecosystems to recover from damage by 2050. University of Queensland scientist Professor Catherine Lovelock said the study found many components of marine ecosystems could be rebuilt if we try harder to address the causes of their decline.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.04.2020
Researchers help show it's possible to reuse N95 masks
Researchers help show it’s possible to reuse N95 masks
Researchers from Stanford and other universities scoured the scientific literature to create N95decon.org, a web portal that medical professionals can access for trustworthy information on how to decontaminate used N95 masks. As health workers and first responders in the United States try to stem a pandemic without adequate protective gear, health officials are forced to consider a stopgap - decontaminating and reusing N95 masks to shield those whose jobs expose them to the virus that causes COVID-19.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.04.2020
New sensors could offer early detection of lung tumors
New sensors could offer early detection of lung tumors
People who are at high risk of developing lung cancer, such as heavy smokers, are routinely screened with computed tomography (CT), which can detect tumors in the lungs. However, this test has an extremely high rate of false positives, as it also picks up benign nodules in the lungs. Researchers at MIT have now developed a new approach to early diagnosis of lung cancer: a urine test that can detect the presence of proteins linked to the disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.04.2020
Suspect cells' 'neighbor' implicated in colorectal cancer
Suspect cells’ ’neighbor’ implicated in colorectal cancer
Colorectal cancer kills more than 50,000 people a year in the United States alone, but scientists have struggled to find the exact mechanisms that trigger the growth of tumors in the intestine. Cancer researchers have zeroed in on a tightly sequestered group of stem cells within the intestine as suspects in the development of colon cancer but have been unable to explain exactly how genetic mutations within those stem cells can cause tumors of the digestive track.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.04.2020
UK genome analysis has important implications for COVID-19 clinical trials
Researchers from Bristol's School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine have been growing the live human SARS-CoV-2 virus in a controlled lab to investigate what the virus is doing inside monkey and human cells. Using state-of-the-art scientific techniques, the team isolated parts of the SARS-CoV-2 virus to find out how the virus instructs the cell to make virus proteins, which can either be used to form virus particles or slow our immune response.

Life Sciences - Environment - 01.04.2020
About the distribution of biodiversity on our planet
About the distribution of biodiversity on our planet
Large open-water fish predators such as tunas or sharks hunt for prey more intensively in the temperate zone than near the equator. With this result, a study headed by Marius Roesti of the University of Bern is challenging a long-standing explanation for the distribution of biodiversity on our planet.

Life Sciences - Physics - 01.04.2020
How dopamine drives brain activity
How dopamine drives brain activity
A specialized MRI sensor reveals the neurotransmitter's influence on neural activity throughout the brain. Using a specialized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sensor, MIT neuroscientists have discovered how dopamine released deep within the brain influences both nearby and distant brain regions. Dopamine plays many roles in the brain, most notably related to movement, motivation, and reinforcement of behavior.

Life Sciences - 01.04.2020
University of Innsbruck develops novel corona test method
University of Innsbruck develops novel corona test method
Michael Traugott and the spin-off company Sinsoma GmbH, together with the Departments of Zoology and Microbiology at the University of Innsbruck, are developing a new PCR system for the detection of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. This new PCR method works with different analytical materials that are easier to obtain and allow high-throughput testing.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.04.2020
Blocking the Iron Transport Could Stop Tuberculosis
Blocking the Iron Transport Could Stop Tuberculosis
The bacteria that cause tuberculosis need iron to survive. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now solved the first detailed structure of the transport protein responsible for the iron supply. When the iron transport into the bacteria is inhibited, the pathogen can no longer grow. This opens novel ways to develop targeted tuberculosis drugs.

Life Sciences - 31.03.2020
Honeyeaters send lightning-fast warning signals
Honeyeaters send lightning-fast warning signals
New Holland honeyeaters are experts at sounding the alarm when there's danger, according to new research from biologists Jessica McLachlan and Rob Magrath. They found honeyeaters can spread the word in the blink of an eye, using a two-stage alarm. It's particularly effective when they are threatened by fast-moving birds of prey.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.03.2020
Identification of viruses and bacteria could be sped up through computational methods
Identification of viruses and bacteria could be sped up through computational methods
A new multinational study has shown how the process of distinguishing viruses and bacteria could be accelerated through the use of computational methods. The researchers, led by the University of Edinburgh, with colleagues from Cambridge, London, Slovenia and China, used a combination of theoretical and experimental methods to develop a strategy to detect the DNA of infectious diseases.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.03.2020
Universities join forces to help pandemic fight
Scientists at the Universities of Dundee are Glasgow are combining their expertise to aid the global battle against coronavirus. The collaboration brings world-leading researchers at Medical Research Council-funded units at both institutions together to generate biological tools that will enable them to study the virus and identify ways of defeating it.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.03.2020
How the novel coronavirus binds to human cells
Coronaviruses infect humans by binding to specific proteins, known as receptors, on human cell surfaces. Researchers from the University of Minnesota, led by Professor Fang Li in the Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences at the College of Veterinary Medicine , recently broke new ground in understanding how SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, binds to its human receptor.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.03.2020
Key-and vulnerable-features of novel coronavirus
The novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, is closely related to the SARS virus that caused devastation in 2002-03. A University of Minnesota team, led by researcher Fang Li, studied how mutations that changed the structure of a SARS-CoV-2 protein enabled it to attach more securely to human cells than its predecessor, infect human cells better, and spread faster.

Life Sciences - Environment - 27.03.2020
Scientists document seasonal migrations of fish across the deep-sea floor for the first time
Scientists have, for the first time, documented seasonal migrations of fish across the seafloor in deep-sea fish, revealing an important insight that will further scientific understanding of the nature of our planet. The study - published today in the Journal of Animal Ecology and led by the University of Glasgow and Nova Southeastern University in Florida - analysed over seven years of deep-sea photographic data from West Africa, linking seasonal patterns in surface-ocean productivity with observed behavioural patterns of fishes at 1500 metres.

Life Sciences - Environment - 27.03.2020
Scientists predict the size of plastics animals can eat
A team of scientists at Cardiff University has, for the first time, developed a way of predicting the size of plastics different animals are likely to ingest. The researchers, from the University's Water Research Institute, looked at the gut contents of more than 2,000 animals to create a simple equation to predict the size of a plastic item an animal can eat, based on the length of its body.

Environment - Life Sciences - 26.03.2020
Marine species respond as oceans warm
A global analysis of over 300 marine species spanning more than 100 years, shows that mammals, plankton, fish, plants and seabirds have been changing in abundance as our climate warms. At the cool edge of species ranges marine life is doing well as warming opens up habitat that was previously inaccessible, while at the warmer edge species are declining as conditions become too warm to tolerate.

Physics - Life Sciences - 25.03.2020
Giant cavity in key tuberculosis molecule
SLAC Overview Our Mission, Vision & Values SLAC By The Numbers Director's Office Past SLAC Directors and Deputy Directors Wolfgang (Pief) K. H.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 17 Next »

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |