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Health - Life Sciences - 30.12.2020
Moving towards new cancer therapies with computer simulations at IDSIA USI-SUPSI
Moving towards new cancer therapies with computer simulations at IDSIA USI-SUPSI
From a research hypothesis in experimental biology to the possible application in the field of anticancer therapies, through computer simulations. This is the essential course of an interdisciplinary and international research project that has identified the mechanisms by which particular peptides can penetrate cell membranes and contribute to the elimination of tumors.

Life Sciences - 29.12.2020
A single gene 'invented' haemoglobin several times
A single gene ’invented’ haemoglobin several times
Thanks to the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii , an animal whose genes have evolved very slowly, scientists from CNRS, Université de Paris and Sorbonne Université, in association with others at the University of Saint Petersburg and the University of Rio de Janeiro, have shown that while haemoglobin appeared independently in several species, it actually descends from a single gene transmitted to all by their last common ancestor.

Life Sciences - Physics - 29.12.2020
Sugars influence cell-to-surface adhesion
Sugars influence cell-to-surface adhesion
How can cells adhere to surfaces and move on them? This is a question which was investigated by an international team of researchers headed by Prof. Michael Hippler from the University of Münster and Prof. Kaiyao Huang from the Institute of Hydrobiology (Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China).

Life Sciences - 29.12.2020
A single gene 'invented' haemoglobin several times
A single gene ’invented’ haemoglobin several times
Thanks to the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii , an animal whose genes have evolved very slowly, scientists from CNRS, Université de Paris and Sorbonne Université, in association with others at the University of Saint Petersburg and the University of Rio de Janeiro, have shown that while haemoglobin appeared independently in several species, it actually descends from a single gene transmitted to all by their last common ancestor.

Environment - Life Sciences - 28.12.2020
The science behind extinction
Latest Stanford Health Alerts on COVID-19 COVID-19 Info for Stanford Earth Losing species Image credit: Shutterstock A collection of research and insights from Stanford experts who are deciphering the mysteries and mechanisms of extinction and survival in Earth's deep past and painting an increasingly detailed picture of life now at the brink.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.12.2020
New research highlights the importance of the thymus in successful pregnancies
New research highlights the importance of the thymus in successful pregnancies
How the immune system adapts to pregnancies has puzzled scientists for decades. Now, findings from an international group of researchers, led by experts at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, reveal important changes that occur in the thymus to prevent miscarriages and gestational diabetes. The thymus is a central organ of the immune system where specialised immune cells called T lymphocytes mature.

Life Sciences - 23.12.2020
The first endovascular technology that can explore capillaries
The first endovascular technology that can explore capillaries
Scientists have invented a technique to navigate electronic devices that are smaller than human hair inside blood vessels and reach arterioles. The next step will be conducting in vivo tests. The cardiovascular system is astonishing. It uses the blood that circulates in our veins and arteries to transport oxygen and nutrients to every tissue in the body.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 23.12.2020
Genetic Engineering without Unwanted Side-Effects Helps Fight Parasites
Genetic Engineering without Unwanted Side-Effects Helps Fight Parasites
Modified CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing scissors are enabling researchers at UZH to make alterations to the genetic material of single-cell organisms that are indistinguishable from natural mutations. This method is making it possible to develop a (harmless) experimental live vaccine for the widespread parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

Life Sciences - 23.12.2020
Study estimates 200-plus white sharks breed each year
Study estimates 200-plus white sharks breed each year
A study on the vulnerable white shark has shown that approximately 206 to 252 sharks breed on Australia's east coast each year. The joint study involving The University of Queensland, NSW Department of Primary Industries and Stellenbosch University in South Africa has used genomics to estimate the yearly number of "effective breeders" in the white shark population.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 23.12.2020
Ancient DNA shines light on Caribbean prehistory
Ancient DNA shines light on Caribbean prehistory
An international team of scientists reveals the genetic makeup of the people who lived in the Caribbean between about 400 and 3,100 years ago-at once settling several archaeologic and anthropologic debates, illuminating present-day ancestries and reaching startling conclusions about Indigenous population sizes when Caribbean cultures were devastated by European colonialism beginning in the 1490s.

Life Sciences - Materials Science - 23.12.2020
Scientists pioneer new method of measuring electricity in cells
Electricity is a key ingredient in living bodies. We know that voltage differences are important in biological systems; they drive the beating of the heart and allow neurons to communicate with one another. But for decades, it wasn't possible to measure voltage differences between organelles-the membrane-wrapped structures inside the cell-and the rest of the cell.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 23.12.2020
Love and Hate in the Mouse Brain
Mounting behavior, that awkward thrusting motion dogs sometimes do against your leg, is usually associated with sexual arousal in animals, but this is not always the case. New research by Caltech neuroscientists that explores the motivations behind mounting behavior in mice finds that sometimes there is a thin line between love and hate (or anger) in the mouse brain.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.12.2020
Our 10 most-read science news stories of 2020
From stars in another galaxy to a microscopic virus that has taken hold of the entire Earth: in this overview we present the most-read news items about research at KU Leuven in 2020. Bioscience engineers and economists from KU Leuven mapped out how wood could replace petroleum in the chemical industry.

Life Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 21.12.2020
Ten cool research stories you might have missed this year
There's been a lot going on in 2020, so nobody can be blamed for missing a few things. But amid a tumultuous year in which many pivoted to COVID-19 research , University of Chicago scholars and scientists have also been hard at work continuing to understand the planet and the universe we live in, to improve our lives, and to build a future that's clean, safe and sustainable.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2020
How our brains help us find misplaced objects
Have you ever wondered how we remember the last place we saw our car keys or other objects like mobile phones and glasses? This new research shows we have a type of brain cell that's sensitive to the distance and direction of objects, they call these Vector Trace cells. These are in addition to GPS-like brain cells, which can store maps of places we have been, like our kitchen or a holiday destination.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2020
How a large protein complex assembles in a cell
How a large protein complex assembles in a cell
A team of ETH researchers led by Karsten Weis has developed a method that allows them to study the assembly process for large protein complexes in detail for the first time. As their case study, the biologists chose one of the largest cellular complexes: the nuclear pore complex in yeast cells. Cells produce a great number of different protein complexes, each of which is made up of many individual proteins.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.12.2020
New blood-test device monitors blood chemistry continually
New blood-test device monitors blood chemistry continually
The new device can continuously sense levels of virtually any protein or molecule in the blood. The researchers say it could be transformative for disease detection, patient monitoring and biomedical research. For even the most routine of medical checkups, a blood test is often the first order of business.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 21.12.2020
Emotional headlines have an impact regardless of the credibility of the source
New HU study on the influence of "fake news" on the brain Neurocognitive studies by researchers at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (HU) show that headlines with emotional content influence our judgments about other people even when we consider the media source to be untrustworthy. Rumours, half-truths and misinformation can be consumed and shared non-stop online and have an enormous reach.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2020
Brain Stem Cells Divide over Months
Brain Stem Cells Divide over Months
For the first time, scientists at the University of Zurich have been able to observe stem cells in the adult mouse brain that divide over the course of several months to create new nerve cells. The study shows that brain stem cells are active over a long period, and thus provides new insights for stem cell research.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 18.12.2020
New mechanism of force transduction in muscle cells discovered
New mechanism of force transduction in muscle cells discovered
Researchers of Münster University reveal mechanobiological function of muscle-specific adhesion protein / Study published in "Nature Communications" The ability of cells to sense and respond to their mechanical environment is critical for many cellular processes but the molecular mechanisms underlying cellular mechanosensitivity are still unclear.
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