news 2021

Health - Apr 14
Health
A collaboration between Catalan and American researchers has resulted in the largest public databank known to date on data about gene expression and colonic genetic variants.
Health - Apr 14
Health

Intestinal worm infections can leave women in sub-Saharan Africa more vulnerable to sexually-transmitted viral infections, a new study reveals.

History - Apr 14
History

Research team led by University of Göttingen reconstructs late medieval trade routes digitally. The Hanseatic League was a confederation of merchant guilds and market towns in Northwestern and Central Europe, which came to dominate trade in the region for three hundred years.

Physics - Apr 14
Physics

In-depth research into the physics of a new type of plasma rockets for space missions and revolutionising their design.

History - Apr 14
History

A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, with colleagues from Goethe University, Frankfurt, has found the first evidence for ancient honey hunting, locked inside pottery fragments from prehistoric West Africa, dating back some 3,500 years ago.


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Health - Life Sciences - 14.04.2021
Largest public database on genetic variants that regulate colonic gene expression
Largest public database on genetic variants that regulate colonic gene expression
A collaboration between Catalan and American researchers has resulted in the largest public databank known to date on data about gene expression and colonic genetic variants.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.04.2021
Worm infections leave African women more vulnerable to STIs
Worm infections leave African women more vulnerable to STIs
Intestinal worm infections can leave women in sub-Saharan Africa more vulnerable to sexually-transmitted viral infections, a new study reveals. The rate and severity of sexually-transmitted viral infections (STI) in the region are very high, as are those of worm infections, which when caught in the intestine can change immunity in other parts of the body.

Physics - 14.04.2021
A European project to develop electrodeless plasma thrusters
A European project to develop electrodeless plasma thrusters
In-depth research into the physics of a new type of plasma rockets for space missions and revolutionising their design. This is the aim of ZARATHUSTRA, a European ERC Starting Grant research project at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) that aims to develop a new aerospace technology and whose results could also be applied in other fields, such as nuclear fusion by magnetic confinement.

History / Archeology - 14.04.2021
Revealing the routes of the Hanseatic era online
Revealing the routes of the Hanseatic era online
Research team led by University of Göttingen reconstructs late medieval trade routes digitally The Hanseatic League was a confederation of merchant guilds and market towns in Northwestern and Central Europe, which came to dominate trade in the region for three hundred years. A digital platform has now been built which reveals the long-distance trade routes in Northern Europe between 1350 and 1650.

History / Archeology - Chemistry - 14.04.2021
Ancient pottery reveals the first evidence for honey hunting in prehistoric West Africa
Ancient pottery reveals the first evidence for honey hunting in prehistoric West Africa
A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, with colleagues from Goethe University, Frankfurt, has found the first evidence for ancient honey hunting, locked inside pottery fragments from prehistoric West Africa, dating back some 3,500 years ago. Honeybees are an iconic species, being the world's most important pollinator of food crops.

Environment - 14.04.2021
Ocean temperature reconstructed over the last 700,000 years
Ocean temperature reconstructed over the last 700,000 years
Researchers from the Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research at the University of Bern reconstructed for the first mean ocean temperatures over the last 700,000 years using ice core data. The new knowledge serves to improve our understanding of the climate system. Bern's ice core researchers were already able to demonstrate in 2008 how the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere has changed over the past 800,000 years.

Chemistry - Health - 14.04.2021
New hydrogel can repair tears in human tissue
New hydrogel can repair tears in human tissue
Scientists have developed an injectable gel that can attach to various kinds of soft internal tissues and repair tears resulting from an accident or trauma.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.04.2021
UofG to investigate the effects of COVID-19 on blood vessels and blood pressure
A project at the University of Glasgow that is aiming to better understand the effects that COVID-19 infection has on blood vessels and blood pressure has received a grant of £250,000 from national charity Heart Research UK. Research has shown that people who are older, obese, male or those who have other medical problems including high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, or chronic lung conditions, have a higher risk of developing severe COVID-19.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.04.2021
Patients of women doctors more likely to be vaccinated against the flu
New UCLA research suggests that elderly patients of female physicians are more likely than those of male physicians in the same outpatient practice to be vaccinated against the flu. This trend holds for all racial and ethnic groups studied and could provide insight into improving vaccination rates for influenza, COVID-19 and other illnesses, according to the research letter , which is published in the peer-reviewed JAMA Internal Medicine.

Social Sciences - Health - 13.04.2021
No evidence of a significant increase in risk of suicide in first months of the pandemic, but continued monitoring needed
A new observational study is the first to examine suicides occurring during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic in multiple countries and finds that suicide numbers largely remained unchanged or declined in the pandemic's early months. The study, led by an international team including University of Bristol researchers, is published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal.

Career - Economics / Business - 13.04.2021
Paid family leave does not hurt employers
With the battle over federal paid family leave heating up again, a new Stanford study has answers to a key question at the heart of the debate: Are businesses hurt when workers take time off with pay to care for a child or ailing family member? The answer is no, according to research by Maya Rossin-Slater , an associate professor of medicine and a SIEPR faculty fellow.

Psychology - 13.04.2021
Zoom fatigue worse for women
In the first large-scale study examining the full extent of Zoom fatigue, Stanford researchers find that women report feeling more exhausted than men following video calls - and the "self-view" display may be to blame. With the pandemic forcing many Americans to retreat into their homes, video calls have taken over people's work and personal lives.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.04.2021
'All-in-One' Technique that Could Accelerate Phage-Therapy Diagnosis
’All-in-One’ Technique that Could Accelerate Phage-Therapy Diagnosis
Lensless Imaging System Affirms Phage Therapy's Value in Treating Serious Infection, Tracks Phage Resistance and Could Easily Be Implemented in Compact Devices at Phage Labs GRENOBLE, France - April 13, 2021 - A team of French and Swiss scientists has demonstrated a lensless imaging technique that could easily be implemented in cost-effective and compact devices in phage laboratories to accelerate phage-therapy diagnosis.

Health - Pharmacology - 13.04.2021
UK variant, B.1.1.7, does not increase disease severity in hospitalised patients
UK variant, B.1.1.7, does not increase disease severity in hospitalised patients
The B.1.1.7 variant of Covid-19 - otherwise known as the UK or Kent variant - is not associated with more severe illness and death in hospitalised patients, but appears to lead to higher virus load, suggests a new study led by UCL researchers. As part of the observational study, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, researchers assessed 341 Covid-19 patients admitted to University College London Hospital and North Middlesex University Hospital (NMUH), between 9 November and 20 December 2020.

Media - 13.04.2021
A study analyses how digital press represents people with disabilities
Researchers from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Spanish Centre for Subtitling and Audio Description (CESyA, in its Spanish acronym) have analysed the state of representation of people with disabilities in the Spanish digital press. The study, recently published in the Spanish Journal of Disability, analyses media representation of disability with the aim of determining whether the media analysed is spreading a stereotyped or discriminatory image of this group of people, which may affect their relationships with other members of society.

Health - Pharmacology - 13.04.2021
Parkinson's disease: wearable sensors to track symptoms
Scientists have developed algorithms that, combined with wearable sensors, could help clinicians to monitor the progression of Parkinson's disease and assess the effects of medications commonly used by people with this neurodegenerative disorder. Parkinson's disease affects neurons in an area of the brain that controls movement, causing tremors, difficulty walking and other motor problems.

Environment - 13.04.2021
Tree hydraulics and water relations: why trees die as a result of drought
When trees die during a period of drought, they die of thirst. Researchers from the University of Basel have demonstrated in a field study that a rapid collapse in the hydraulic system is responsible for tree death. And they found out that the trees possibly die more rapidly than previously thought.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.04.2021
Is it Possible to Slow Down Age-Related Memory Loss?
A team of researchers from Berlin, Dortmund, and Graz are investigating how the substance spermidine can protect aging brain cells. No 062/2021 from Apr 13, 2021 According to a recent study, age-related memory loss may be preventable. Researchers from Freie Universität Berlin, the NeuroCure Cluster of Excellence, the Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften (ISAS) in Dortmund, and the University of Graz found that the substance spermidine - something that is present in all human cells - can protect the mitochondria found in aging brain cells.

Innovation - 13.04.2021
3D-printed Material to Replace Ivory
3D-printed Material to Replace Ivory
With an elephant-friendly alternative to ivory, developed by TU Wien and Cubicure, old artefacts can be restored with high precision. For centuries, ivory was often used to make art objects. But to protect elephant populations, the ivory trade was banned internationally in 1989. To restore ivory parts of old art objects, one must therefore resort to substitute materials - such as bones, shells or plastic.

Environment - Health - 13.04.2021
U.S. Power Sector is Halfway to Zero Carbon Emissions
U.S. Power Sector is Halfway to Zero Carbon Emissions
– By Kiran Julin and Bentham Paulos Concerns about climate change are driving a growing number of states, utilities, and corporations to set the goal of zeroing out power-sector carbon emissions. To date 17 states plus Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico have adopted laws or executive orders to achieve 100% carbon-free electricity in the next couple of decades.
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