news 2021

Astronomy - Apr 20
Astronomy
The University of Cambridge is creating a new research initiative, bringing together physicists, chemists, biologists, mathematicians, and earth scientists to answer fundamental questions on the origin and nature of life in the Universe.
Health - Apr 20

A team led by a UCL clinical academic has outlined the mechanism behind rare cases of blood clots and low platelets seen in patients who have had the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine. The new study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine , highlights the importance of rapidly spotting this new syndrome, known as vaccine-induced thrombosis and thrombocytopenia (VITT), as it requires a very different treatment from what is typically recommended for thrombosis.

Pharmacology - Apr 20

The decision to stop prescribing long-term anti-depressants should be made only after careful preparation by GPs and their patients, University of Queensland research has found. The qualitative study was based on interviews with 22 GPs working in urban and regional areas, who said there was no standardised approach.

Life Sciences - Apr 20
Life Sciences

Genome editing in farm animals - Genetically engineered animals provide important insights into the molecular basis of health and disease.

Environment - Apr 20
Environment

Scientists from The Australian National University (ANU) are looking for volunteers to help create Australia's longest daily weather record from a globally recognised climate change "hot spot".


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Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 20.04.2021
From extravagant to achievable - pushing the boundaries of research to find life beyond Earth
From extravagant to achievable - pushing the boundaries of research to find life beyond Earth
The University of Cambridge is creating a new research initiative, bringing together physicists, chemists, biologists, mathematicians, and earth scientists to answer fundamental questions on the origin and nature of life in the Universe.

Health - Pharmacology - 20.04.2021
Covid-19: Clinicians uncover rare blood clotting syndrome
A team led by a UCL clinical academic has outlined the mechanism behind rare cases of blood clots and low platelets seen in patients who have had the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine. The new study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine , highlights the importance of rapidly spotting this new syndrome, known as vaccine-induced thrombosis and thrombocytopenia (VITT), as it requires a very different treatment from what is typically recommended for thrombosis.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.04.2021
Chickens and pigs with built-in genetic scissors
Chickens and pigs with built-in genetic scissors
Genome editing in farm animals Genetically engineered animals provide important insights into the molecular basis of health and disease. Research has focused mainly on genetically modified mice, although other species, such as pigs, are more similar to human physiology. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now generated chickens and pigs in which target genes in desired organs can be efficiently altered.

Pharmacology - 20.04.2021
Discontinuing antidepressants requires careful planning
The decision to stop prescribing long-term anti-depressants should be made only after careful preparation by GPs and their patients, University of Queensland research has found. The qualitative study was based on interviews with 22 GPs working in urban and regional areas, who said there was no standardised approach.

Environment - History / Archeology - 20.04.2021
Scientists look to
Scientists look to "hot spot" for longest weather record
Scientists from The Australian National University (ANU) are looking for volunteers to help create Australia's longest daily weather record from a globally recognised climate change "hot spot".  The citizen science project will help scientists reconstruct Perth's daily weather from 1830 to the present day.

Psychology - 20.04.2021
Our attention is captured by eye-glance
Our attention is captured by eye-glance
Scientists have shown that when we look at each other, our attention is focused on the social interaction, disrupting our perception of time. Eyes play an important role in social communication by expressing the intentions of our interlocutors, and even more so in times of pandemic when half of the face is hidden.

Environment - Campus - 20.04.2021
Can extreme melt destabilize ice sheets?
Researchers have deciphered a trove of data that shows one season of extreme melt can reduce the Greenland Ice Sheet's capacity to store future meltwater - and increase the likelihood of future melt raising sea levels. Nearly a decade ago, global news outlets reported vast ice melt in the Arctic as sapphire lakes glimmered across the previously frozen Greenland Ice Sheet, one of the most important contributors to sea-level rise.

Health - 20.04.2021
Proportion of Black physicians in U.S. has changed little in 120 years, UCLA research finds
A new UCLA study finds that the proportion of physicians who are Black in the U.S. has increased by only 4 percentage points over the past 120 years, and that the share of doctors who are Black men remains unchanged since 1940. The research also spotlights a significant income gap between white and Black male physicians — a disparity, the researcher writes, that could reflect a combination of pay discrimination and unequal access for physicians to pursue careers in more lucrative specialties.

Health - Psychology - 20.04.2021
Epidurals not linked to autism risk
Refuting an earlier study, researchers found that epidural anesthesia, commonly administered for pain relief during labor, does not increase the risk for autism in children. Having an epidural during childbirth is not associated with a greater risk of autism in the child, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the University of Manitoba.

Health - Pharmacology - 20.04.2021
Are medical AI devices evaluated appropriately?
In just the last two years, artificial intelligence has become embedded in scores of medical devices that offer advice to ER doctors, cardiologists, oncologists, and countless other health care providers. The Food and Drug Administration has approved at least 130 AI-powered medical devices, half of them in the last year alone, and the numbers are certain to surge far higher in the next few years.

Social Sciences - 19.04.2021
Social Status calculator shows what
Social Status calculator shows what "class" you would have been in Shakespeare’s Time
Researchers from the University of Kent, King's College London and the University of Birmingham have developed a class calculator to explore the cultural and social world of the 16 th and 17 th Century England. The calculator will allow individuals to see where they would have sat on the social scale during the period of 1560 - 1660 and can be used as a research tool to identify the status of historic figures.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 19.04.2021
Durham among first to use Hubble successor
Durham among first to use Hubble successor
Durham's astronomers are playing a key role in the biggest scientific programme to be carried out on the new successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. Our scientists will use NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to hunt for dark matter and investigate early galaxy formation. The JWST is the largest, most powerful space telescope ever built and is scheduled for launch in October 2021 before beginning operations in 2022.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 19.04.2021
The architect of genome folding
The architect of genome folding
The spatial organization of the genome is fundamental for the regulation of our genes and has to be established de novo during early embryogenesis. By combining powerful Drosophila genetics with 3D chromosome modelling, a collaboration between the Giorgetti group at the FMI and the MPI of Immunobiology and Epigenetics in Freiburg revealed a critical role of the epigenetic regulator HP1 in the establishment of 3D genome organization in the early Drosophila embryo.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 19.04.2021
Biodiversity on Swiss Farmland Recorded Nationwide for the First Time
Biodiversity on Swiss Farmland Recorded Nationwide for the First Time
Many plant and animal species depend on habitats shaped by agriculture. Where and with what frequency do which species occur in the agricultural landscape? What is the state of their habitats? How effective are the measures taken to increase biodiversity? Agroscope's biodiversity monitoring programme 'ALL-EMA' records species and habitat diversity in the Swiss agricultural landscape.

Environment - Computer Science - 19.04.2021
AI empowers environmental regulators
AI empowers environmental regulators
Monitoring environmental compliance is a particular challenge for governments in poor countries. A new machine learning approach that uses satellite imagery to pinpoint highly polluting brick kilns in Bangladesh could provide a low-cost solution. By Rob Jordan Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment Like superheroes capable of seeing through obstacles, environmental regulators may soon wield the power of all-seeing eyes that can identify violators anywhere at any time, according to a new Stanford University-led study.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 19.04.2021
New Exoplanet discovered orbiting young Sun-like star
New Exoplanet discovered orbiting young Sun-like star
Astronomers from the Netherlands, Belgium, Chile, the USA and Germany have imaged the newly discovered exoplanet "YSES 2b" right next to its host star An international research team with the participation of Dr Markus Mugrauer from the Astrophysical Institute of Friedrich Schiller University Jena has succeeded in the direct imaging of a young exoplanet.

Health - 19.04.2021
Human challenge trial launches to study immune response to COVID-19
Though the COVID-19 pandemic has now been active for a year, not much is known about what happens when people who have already had COVID-19 are infected for a second time. Researchers at the University of Oxford have launched a human challenge trial to look at what kind of immune response can stop people from becoming re-infected.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 19.04.2021
Biomass production in lakes becomes easier to de-termine
The condition of Swiss lakes has improved thanks to stricter protection measures, but less than expected. A new method developed by Eawag for calculating biomass production in lakes provides explanations and a basis for further water protection measures. "No bathing" rules were still imposed on many Swiss lakeshores until the 1980s.

Health - Campus - 19.04.2021
Cells migrate in a unique way on soft surfaces
Stanford engineers find that cancer cells exhibit a unique mode of migration on squishy materials, which are similar to biological tissues. In contrast, cell movement - a process central to cancer metastasis and other biological processes - is typically studied on very rigid materials. Inside your body, cell movement plays a crucial role in many significant biological processes, including wound healing, immune responses and the potential spread of cancer.

Health - 19.04.2021
Price of food may influence decision to buy alcohol, new UK research suggests
People consume less alcohol as the price of food increases, suggesting this may influence the decision to buy it, a new study led by Cardiff University has found. The research, which is the first to look at the link between alcohol consumption and cost of food, found a 1% increase in food price led to a 1% decrease in alcohol consumption.
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