news 2021


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Results 81 - 100 of 563.


Physics - Materials Science - 22.02.2021
Magnetic effect without a magnet
Surprise in solid-state physics: The Hall effect, which normally requires magnetic fields, can also be generated in a completely different way - with extreme strength. Electric current is deflected by a magnetic field - in conducting materials this leads to the so-called Hall effect. This effect is often used to measure magnetic fields.

Physics - Materials Science - 22.02.2021
Concept for a new storage medium
Concept for a new storage medium
Physicists from Switzerland, Germany and Ukraine have proposed an innovative new data storage medium. The technique is based on specific properties of antiferromagnetic materials that had previously resisted experimental examination. Using nanoscale quantum sensors, an international research team has succeeded in exploring certain previously uncharted physical properties of an antiferromagnetic material.

Materials Science - 22.02.2021
Even multi-story timber buildings can safely survive compartment fires
Even multi-story timber buildings can safely survive compartment fires
Realistic full-scale fire experiments on the TUM Garching campus How safe are multi-story timber buildings in case of fire? This question is addressed by the "TIMpuls" research project, led by the Technical University of Munich (TUM). The scientists' objective is to establish valid basic principles for uniform regulations for the construction of multi-story timber buildings.

Environment - Health - 22.02.2021
Banning wild meat could add to global food problems
Banning wild meat could add to global food problems
A blanket ban on the trade of wild meat could create risks for nature and for human health, according to a new study. Governments and the World Health Organization (WHO) are under pressure from wildlife protection and animal welfare campaigners to ban hunting of all wild animals for food, and end trade in wildlife.

Environment - 22.02.2021
Gardens are secret powerhouse for pollinators
Gardens are secret powerhouse for pollinators
Home gardens are by far the biggest source of food for pollinating insects, including bees and wasps, in cities and towns, according to new research. The study, led by the University of Bristol and published today in the Journal of Ecology , measured for the first time how much nectar is produced in urban areas and discovered residential gardens accounted for the vast majority - some 85 per cent on average.

Health - Social Sciences - 22.02.2021
Air pollution impacts on children's health
Air pollution impacts on children’s health
First of its kind study reveals evidence that early exposure to dirty air alters genes in a way that could lead to adult heart disease, among other ailments. The findings could change the way medical experts and parents think about the air children breathe and inform clinical interventions. Children exposed to air pollution, such as wildfire smoke and car exhaust, for as little as one day may be doomed to higher rates of heart disease and other ailments in adulthood, according to a new Stanford-led study.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 22.02.2021
Martian moons have a common ancestor
Martian moons have a common ancestor
Phobos and Deimos are the remains of a larger Martian moon that was disrupted between 1 and 2.7 billion years ago, say researchers from the Institute of Geophysics at ETH Zurich and the Physics Institute at the University of Zurich. They reached this conclusion using computer simulations and seismic recordings from the InSight Mars mission.

Computer Science - 22.02.2021
Security flaw detected for the second time in credit cards
After finding a vulnerability in certain credit cards for the first time last year, ETH researchers have now found a way to outsmart the PIN codes for other payment cards. Making a contactless payment with a credit or debit card is quick and easy, and has proved particularly useful during the current pandemic.

Architecture - 22.02.2021
CEA-Leti & Dolphin Design Report FD-SOI Breakthrough that Boosts Operating Frequency by 450% and Reduces Power Consumption by 30%
CEA-Leti & Dolphin Design Report FD-SOI Breakthrough that Boosts Operating Frequency by 450% and Reduces Power Consumption by 30%
J oin t Paper Presented at ISSCC 2021 Shows How New Adaptive Back-Biasing Technique O vercomes Integration Limits in Chip Design Flows CEA-Leti & Dolphin Design Report FD-SOI Breakthrough that Boosts Operating Frequency by 450% and Reduces Power Consumption by 30% GRENOBLE, France - Feb. 22, 2021 - CEA-Leti and Dolphin Design have developed an adaptive back-biasing (ABB) architecture for FD-SOI chips that can be seamlessly integrated in the digital design flow with industrial-grade qualification, overcoming integration drawbacks of existing ABB techniques.

Environment - Campus - 22.02.2021
There is no one-size-fits-all road to sustainability on "Patchwork Earth"
In a world as diverse as our own, the journey towards a sustainable future will look different depending on where in the world we live, according to a recent paper published in One Earth and led by McGill University, with researchers from the Stockholm Resilience Centre.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 22.02.2021
Sleep is vital to associating emotion with memory, according to U-M study
Sleep is vital to associating emotion with memory, according to U-M study
When you slip into sleep, it's easy to imagine that your brain shuts down, but University of Michigan research suggests that groups of neurons activated during prior learning keep humming, tattooing memories into your brain. U-M researchers have been studying how memories associated with a specific sensory event are formed and stored in mice.

Physics - 19.02.2021
UC San Diego Physicists Uncover Phenomena Tied to New State of Matter
Take a window screen and put it on top of another. Slide the screens back and forth and a dizzying array of geometrical shapes and wavy patterns come into view. Known as the moiré effect, this phenomenon is now helping physicists at the University of California San Diego explain fundamental properties of exotic particles, such as excitons.

Social Sciences - Health - 19.02.2021
Babies born too early likely to face educational and lifelong behavioral setbacks
SHP's Lee Sanders and his Stanford colleagues found that after adjusting for socioeconomic status and compared with full-term births, moderate and late preterm births are associated with increased risk of low performance in mathematics and English language arts, as well as chronic absenteeism and suspension from school.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.02.2021
Coronavirus Origin Study Released
Coronavirus Origin Study Released
The coronavirus has led to a worldwide crisis for over a year. In a new study, nanoscientist Roland Wiesendanger illuminates the origins of the virus. His findings conclude there are a number of quality sources indicating a laboratory accident at the Wuhan Institute of Virology as the cause of the current pandemic.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 19.02.2021
Life of a pure Martian design
Life of a pure Martian design
Experimental microbially assisted chemolithotrophy provides an opportunity to trace the putative bioalteration processes of the Martian crust. A study on the Noachian Martian breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034 composed of ancient (ca. 4.5 Gyr old) crustal materials from Mars, led by ERC grantee Tetyana Milojevic from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna, now delivered a unique prototype of microbial life experimentally designed on a real Martian material.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 19.02.2021
New African groundwater maps reveal widespread resilience to climate change
New African groundwater maps reveal widespread resilience to climate change
Reserves of groundwater in much of the populated parts of Africa are being replenished at rates that could help to protect communities against the damaging effects of climate change, finds a new study co-authored by UCL. Published in the journal Environmental Research Letters , the study has revealed that the long-term groundwater recharge (the rate at which groundwater is replenished) in Africa is approximately 15,000 cubic km per decade - enough to sustain widespread groundwater pumping for drinking water and irrigatation for farming.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.02.2021
Spina bifida can be caused by uninherited genetic mutations
Spina bifida can be caused by uninherited genetic mutations
Genetic mutations which occur naturally during the earliest stages of an embryo's development can cause the severe birth defect spina bifida, finds a new experimental study in mice led by UCL scientists. The study, published in  Nature Communications , explains for the first time how a 'mosaic mutation' - a mutation which is not inherited from either parent (either via sperm or egg cell) but occurs randomly during cell divisions in the developing embryo - causes spina bifida.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 19.02.2021
Boys who play video games have lower depression risk
Boys who play video games have lower depression risk
Boys who regularly play video games at age 11 are less likely to develop depressive symptoms three years later, finds a new study led by a UCL researcher. The study, published in Psychological Medicine , also found that girls who spend more time on social media appear to develop more depressive symptoms.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 19.02.2021
Making sense of the mass data generated from firing neurons
Scientists have achieved a breakthrough in predicting the behaviour of neurons in large networks operating at the mysterious edge of chaos. New research from the University of Sussex and Kyoto University outlines a new method capable of analysing the masses of data generated by thousands of individual neurons.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 19.02.2021
Release of nutrients from lake-bottom sediments worsens Lake Erie's annual 'dead zone,' could intensify as climate warms
Release of nutrients from lake-bottom sediments worsens Lake Erie’s annual ’dead zone,’ could intensify as climate warms
Robotic laboratories on the bottom of Lake Erie have revealed that the muddy sediments there release nearly as much of the nutrient phosphorus into the surrounding waters as enters the lake's central basin each year from rivers and their tributaries. Excessive phosphorus, largely from agricultural sources, contributes to the annual summer cyanobacteria bloom that plagues Lake Erie's western basin and the central basin's annual "dead zone,” an oxygen-starved region that blankets several thousand square miles of lake bottom and that reduces habitat for fish and other organisms.

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