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Life Sciences - Physics - 26.11.2021
Three-dimensional X-ray image throws light on neurodegenerative disease
Three-dimensional X-ray image throws light on neurodegenerative disease
Team from Göttingen University and University Medical Center identifies changes in nerve tissue in Alzheimer's What changes occur in parts of the brain affected by neurodegenerative disease? How does the structure of the neurons change? Some pathological changes in the tissue are easy to identify using standard microscopy.

Physics - 26.11.2021
In quantum mechanics, not even time flows as you might expect it to
In quantum mechanics, not even time flows as you might expect it to
The boundary between forward and backward blurs in quantum mechanics A team of physicists at the Universities of Vienna, Bristol, the Balearic Islands and the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI-Vienna) has shown how quantum systems can simultaneously evolve along two opposite time arrows (forward and backward in time).

Life Sciences - Environment - 26.11.2021
The Study of the Microbiome Enables New Strategies for Healthy and Climate-Resilient Crops
The Study of the Microbiome Enables New Strategies for Healthy and Climate-Resilient Crops
Study led by TU Graz shows that apple trees inherit their microbiome to the same extent as their genes. The results lay the foundation for new breeding strategies for healthy and climate-robust fruit and vegetables. Agriculture is facing enormous challenges worldwide due to global changes caused by human activities.

Health - 25.11.2021
New study examines travel trends during COVID-19 lockdown
A recent study of network mobility data suggests it may be necessary to re-examine the government's region-based approach to COVID-19 travel restrictions (Aleks Marinkovic / Pexels) By Robert Rombouts, Special to Western News November 25, 2021 When Ontario implemented regionally targeted lockdowns at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, a common presumption was that travel from highly restricted regions to those with low levels of restriction will increase, negating the intent of the lockdowns.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.11.2021
Presence of murine coronavirus in Canary Islands mice population
Presence of murine coronavirus in Canary Islands mice population
A study published in Frontiers in Veterinary Science reveals the presence of murine coronavirus -the murine hepatitis virus or M-CoV- in mice of the Canary archipelago that could have reached the islands by maritime transport from the European continent. This is the first ecoepidemiological study to examine the presence of coronaviruses that circulate in mice and rats of the natural and urban environment of the islands of La Palma, El Hierro, Tenerife and Lanzarote.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 25.11.2021
'Super jelly' can survive being run over by a car | University of Cambridge
’Super jelly’ can survive being run over by a car | University of Cambridge
Researchers have developed a jelly-like material that can withstand the equivalent of an elephant standing on it, and completely recover to its original shape, even though it's 80% water. At 80% water content, you'd think it would burst apart like a water balloon, but it doesn't: it stays intact and withstands huge compressive forces Oren Scherman The soft-yet-strong material, developed by a team at the , looks and feels like a squishy jelly, but acts like an ultra-hard, shatterproof glass when compressed, despite its high water content.

Pharmacology - Health - 25.11.2021
Scientists produce new antibiotics by gene editing
Scientists have discovered a new route to produce complex antibiotics exploiting gene editing to re-programme pathways to future medicines urgently required to combat antimicrobial resistance , treat neglected diseases and tackle future pandemics. Researchers from The University of Manchester have discovered a new way of manipulating key assembly line enzymes in bacteria which could pave the way for a new generation of antibiotic treatments.

Health - Physics - 25.11.2021
Proton therapy: a success story that started 25 years ago
Proton therapy: a success story that started 25 years ago
On 25 November 1996, the Center for Proton Therapy at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI treated a cancer patient using the spot-scanning technique for the very first time - a world premiere. This technique developed at PSI scans and irradiates deep-seated tumours with a pencil-thin beam of charged particles, killing cancer cells with extreme precision while preserving the surrounding healthy tissue.

Health - 25.11.2021
Patient-led surveillance shows promise for melanoma care
Melanoma patients using their smart phone to submit images of lesions to their specialists appears to be a safe and convenient form of follow-up after treatment. University of Queensland and University of Sydney researchers assessed data from 100 patients who used their phone, had a partner help with skin self-examination and attended regular follow-up visits with a doctor between 2018 and 2020.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 25.11.2021
Tissue engineering using mechanobiology and robotic micromanipulation
Tissue engineering using mechanobiology and robotic micromanipulation
A team of EPFL engineers has discovered a strategy to shape living tissues like dough. Have you ever wondered how a sphere of cells, morula, gives rise to tissues and organs with mesmerizing shapes and architectures? The secret lies in the mechanics of embryonic tissues. They exhibit a viscous (fluid-like) and an elastic (solid-like) behavior depending on the forces acting on them.

Health - 25.11.2021
Extreme heat is a threat to a wider range of people than we thought
Extreme heat is a threat to a wider range of people than we thought
Extreme heat poses an increasing threat to the public, as heat waves are expected to become more frequent, more intense and longer-lasting due to climate change. Although the adverse health impacts of heat are well documented among older adults, less is known about the potential impacts of heat on young and middle-aged adults.

Environment - Social Sciences - 25.11.2021
Researchers investigate health effects of fracking in B.C.'s Northeast
Researchers investigate health effects of fracking in B.C.’s Northeast
With thousands of wells and counting, the Northeast region of British Columbia is one of Canada's most important hubs of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking - the process of blasting pressurized liquid at rock formations to fracture them and release the natural gas trapped inside. Part of the region sits atop the Montney Formation, a massive, football-shaped tract of land that stretches into northwestern Alberta and is believed to contain one of the world's richest reserves of shale gas.

Health - Social Sciences - 25.11.2021
Daily activities more problematic for women than men in old age
Daily activities more problematic for women than men in old age
Women are more likely than men to struggle with both regular daily tasks and mobility activities as they age, according to new analysis of longitudinal cohort studies led by researchers at UCL and the National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM) in France. However, the researchers say disparities in ability to perform daily tasks have been steadily decreasing as the socioeconomic gap between the sexes has decreased.

Psychology - Health - 25.11.2021
Anxiety symptoms may be early indicator of Alzheimer’s disease
The study, led by Monash University Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health researchers Stephanie Perin and Associate Professor Yen Ying Lim, examined the relationship between symptoms of depression and anxiety, and memory and thinking, in 2657 middle-aged adults. Higher anxiety was found to be related to poorer attention and memory.

Environment - 25.11.2021
Virtual landscapes to study endangered Australian ecosystems
Researchers have developed immersive virtual landscapes of intact endangered Australian ecosystems to accurately illustrate changes across time, seasons and following disturbances like bushfires. The study created a virtual reality model of an Australian Box Gum Grassy Woodland landscape, an endangered eucalypt woodland ecosystem that is difficult to observe in its intact pre-European colonisation form.

Life Sciences - Environment - 25.11.2021
Loss of ancient grazers triggered a global rise in fires
Loss of ancient grazers triggered a global rise in fires
From 50,000 years to 6,000 years ago, many of the world's largest animals, including such iconic grassland grazers as the woolly mammoth, giant bison, and ancient horses, went extinct. The loss of these grazing species triggered a dramatic increase in fire activity in the world's grasslands, according to a new Yale-led study published Nov.

Life Sciences - 24.11.2021
For the brain, context is key to new theory of movement and memory | University of Cambridge
For the brain, context is key to new theory of movement and memory | University of Cambridge
Mathematical model could help in physical therapy and shed light on learning more generally.  The COIN model may also generalise to many other forms of learning and memory, not just memories underlying our movement Máté Lengyel How is it that a chef can control their knife to fillet a fish or peel a grape and can wield a cleaver just as efficiently as a paring knife? Even those of us less proficient in the kitchen learn to skilfully handle an astonishing number of different objects throughout our lives, from shoelaces to tennis rackets.

Health - Environment - 24.11.2021
Morning exposure to deep red light improves declining eyesight
Morning exposure to deep red light improves declining eyesight
Just three minutes of exposure to deep red light once a week, when delivered in the morning, can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a pioneering new study by UCL researchers.

Economics / Business - Agronomy / Food Science - 24.11.2021
The livelihood ’quandairy’ of milk producers in a disrupted market
Research team from the University of Göttingen explores what guides Cameroonian milk producers' decision-making after a market disruption   When agricultural markets in the Global South are disrupted, what helps producers stay in business? In regions where work can be hard to find, educational attainment is low, and opportunities for economic diversification are often too few, it is essential to understand what helps smallholder producers maintain their livelihoods.

Health - 24.11.2021
Link between weather and spread of COVID-19
A new meta-analysis of over 150 research papers published during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic has shown the link between the weather and the spread of the illness. The study, published in the journal Weather, Climate, and Society , was conceived and conducted at The University Manchester and led by Ling Tan, a visiting scientist at the Centre for Crisis Studies and Mitigation.
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