news 2021

« BACK

Health



Results 1 - 20 of 1452.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 73 Next »


Health - Life Sciences - 27.12.2021
'Battle of the sexes' begins in womb as father and mother's genes tussle over nutrition
’Battle of the sexes’ begins in womb as father and mother’s genes tussle over nutrition
Cambridge scientists have identified a key signal that the fetus uses to control its supply of nutrients from the placenta in a tug-of-war between genes inherited from the father and from the mother. The study, carried out in mice, could help explain why some babies grow poorly in the womb. The father's gene drives the fetus's demands for larger blood vessels and more nutrients, while the mother's gene in the placenta tries to control how much nourishment she provides Miguel Constância As the fetus grows, it needs to communicate its increasing needs for food to the mother.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.12.2021
Our 10 most-read science news stories of 2021
From abdominal pain after eating certain foods to experimental hearing implants: in this overview, we present the most-read news items about research at KU Leuven in 2021. 10. KU Leuven develops very potent antiviral against dengue 6 October Researchers have developed an inhibitor of the dengue virus.

Materials Science - Health - 23.12.2021
’Pop-up’ Electronic Sensors Could Detect When Individual Heart Cells Misbehave
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a powerful new tool that monitors the electrical activity inside heart cells, using tiny "pop-up" sensors that poke into cells without damaging them. The device directly measures the movement and speed of electrical signals traveling within a single heart cell—a first—as well as between multiple heart cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.12.2021
Clues to treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder found in recently evolved region of the 'dark genome'
Clues to treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder found in recently evolved region of the ’dark genome’
Scientists investigating the DNA outside our genes - the 'dark genome' - have discovered recently evolved regions that code for proteins associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This opens up huge potential for new druggable targets. It's really exciting because nobody has ever looked beyond the genes for clues to understanding and treating these conditions before.

Health - Pharmacology - 23.12.2021
UBC clinical trial supports new self-administered rapid antigen test
UBC clinical trial supports new self-administered rapid antigen test
Q&As Erik Rolfsen When it comes to COVID-19, peace of mind is difficult to come by. But thanks to new research compiled with data from UBC's first on-campus clinical study, a new self-administered rapid antigen test will soon be available in Canada. It's a tool that could help combat growing uncertainty, prevent transmission and potentially save lives.

Pharmacology - Health - 23.12.2021
Abiraterone could halve risk of prostate cancer death for some patients
Abiraterone could halve risk of prostate cancer death for some patients
Adding abiraterone to the standard treatment for locally advanced prostate cancer, where the cancer has a high chance of spreading, could halve the risk of death from the disease, according to the results of a UCL-led trial. The researchers suggest that hormone therapy using abiraterone with prednisolone, could significantly reduce prostate cancer deaths and improve outcomes for thousands of people every year.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.12.2021
Dominant Alpha variant evolved to evade our innate immune system
Dominant Alpha variant evolved to evade our innate immune system
The SARS-CoV-2 Alpha (B.1.1.7) variant mutated to evade our 'innate immune system', helping establish it as the world's first 'Variant of Concern', finds a new study led by researchers at UCL and the Quantitative Biosciences Institute, University of California San Francisco. Published in  Nature , the study shows the Alpha variant, first identified in the UK, evolved to make more of its 'antagonism proteins' that nullify the body's first line of defence, known as the 'innate immune system'.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.12.2021
Booster vaccination strongly enhances COVID-19 immunity in care home residents and staff - study
Booster vaccination strongly enhances COVID-19 immunity in care home residents and staff - study
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email A COVID-19 booster vaccination markedly increases immune response in residents and staff within care homes, making it vital that people living and working in these settings get their third 'jab', a new study reveals.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.12.2021
New graphene-based neural probes improve detection of epileptic brain signals
New graphene-based neural probes improve detection of epileptic brain signals
New research published today has demonstrated that tiny graphene neural probes can be used safely to greatly improve our understanding of the causes of epilepsy. The graphene depth neural probe (gDNP) consists of a millimetre-long linear array of micro-transistors imbedded in a micrometre-thin polymeric flexible substrate.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.12.2021
New grafting technique could combat the disease threatening Cavendish bananas
New grafting technique could combat the disease threatening Cavendish bananas
Scientists have found a novel way to combine two species of grass-like plant including banana, rice and wheat, using embryonic tissue from their seeds. The technique allows beneficial characteristics, such as disease resistance or stress tolerance, to be added to the plants.

Health - 22.12.2021
Rapid immune response in children protects them from Covid-19
Rapid immune response in children protects them from Covid-19
Fundamental differences in the immune response of adults and children can help to explain why children are much less likely to become seriously ill from SARS-CoV-2, finds a new study by researchers at UCL and the Wellcome Sanger Institute. The study is the most comprehensive single-cell study to compare SARS-CoV-2 infection in adults and children across multiple organs.

Health - Career - 22.12.2021
Biology unlikely to drive ethnic differences in Covid-19 risk for healthcare workers
Biology unlikely to drive ethnic differences in Covid-19 risk for healthcare workers
The differences in Covid-19 infection risk between ethnic minority healthcare workers and their white colleagues is likely due to home and work factors rather than biology, finds the largest and most detailed study on the subject, co-led by researchers at UCL. Previous research has shown that healthcare workers from ethnic minority groups are at a disproportionately higher risk of contracting Covid-19 than their white colleagues.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.12.2021
2021’s news highlights from the Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health
Whether it's the continued impact of the Covid-19 pandemic or our world-leading science, our stories have been top news across the country and the world. Here's some of the most popular and interesting news releases from the Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health in 2021.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.12.2021
Covid-19 Infections in Nursing Homes: Simulation model for optimal prevention and vaccination strategies
Covid-19 Infections in Nursing Homes: Simulation model for optimal prevention and vaccination strategies
Researchers from TU Graz and Complexity Science Hub (CSH) Vienna have developed a detailed epidemiological model for the spread of the coronavirus in nursing homes. This enables optimal prevention strategies to be identified, as practical experience in Caritas nursing homes has shown. Since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, residents of nursing homes have been particularly at risk.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.12.2021
T cells: No time to die
T cells: No time to die
They are at the forefront in the fight against viruses, bacteria, and malignant cells: the T cells of our immune system. But the older we get, the fewer of them our body produces. Thus, how long we remain healthy also depends on how long the T cells survive. Researchers at the University of Basel have now uncovered a previously unknown signaling pathway essential for T cell viability.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.12.2021
World's first molecular-level analysis of Omicron variant spike protein
World’s first molecular-level analysis of Omicron variant spike protein
Findings show strong antibody evasion and binding with human cells that contribute to increased transmissibility-and that vaccination remains the best defence UBC researchers are the first in the world to conduct a molecular-level structural analysis of the Omicron variant spike protein. The analysis-done at near atomic resolution using a cryo-electron microscope-reveals how the heavily mutated variant infects human cells and is highly evasive of immunity.

Health - 22.12.2021
Expert insights: Income inequality and COVID-19
By now, many are aware that the pandemic has affected lower-income groups the most within countries, including in Canada. But what most do not know is that income inequality - the economic distance between higher and lower-income groups within individual countries - is also driving national COVID-19 infection and death rates.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.12.2021
Booster jabs strongly enhance Covid-19 immunity in care home residents and staff
Booster jabs strongly enhance Covid-19 immunity in care home residents and staff
A Covid-19 booster vaccination markedly increases immune response in residents and staff within care homes, according to a new preprint study co-led by UCL researchers, making it vital that people living and working in these settings get their third jab. Age and frailty are already recognised as major risk factors for severe Covid-19 outcomes, with elderly residents of long-term care facilities suffering much higher rates of mortality during the pandemic than the general population.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2021
Mechanism for DNA invasion of Adenoviral Covid-19 Vaccines Discovered
Mechanism for DNA invasion of Adenoviral Covid-19 Vaccines Discovered
Adenoviruses have a linchpin protein that stabilizes their DNA until it reaches the infected cell's nucleus. The protein then detaches from the viral genome, and the virus uncoats. Only then are the genes released into the nucleus, which is necessary for the production of new viruses. This process, discovered by researchers at the University of Zurich, is a key for effective functioning of various Covid-19 vaccines.

Health - 21.12.2021
Innovative X-ray imaging shows Covid-19 can cause vascular damage to the heart
Innovative X-ray imaging shows Covid-19 can cause vascular damage to the heart
Interdisciplinary research team from Göttingen University and Hannover Medical School are first to prove this directly An interdisciplinary research team from the University of Göttingen and Hannover Medical School (MHH) has detected significant changes in the heart muscle tissue of people who died from Covid-19.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 73 Next »