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Life Sciences - Health - 02.12.2021
Plant pathogen evades immune system by targeting the microbiome
A team of biologists has identified that the pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae , responsible for wilt disease in many crops, secretes an 'effector' molecule to target the microbiome of plants to promote infection. The research was performed by the team of Alexander von Humboldt Professor Dr Bart Thomma at the University of Cologne (UoC) within the framework of the Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences (CEPLAS) in collaboration with the team of Dr Michael Seidl at the Theoretical Biology & Bioinformatics group of Utrecht University in the Netherlands.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.12.2021
Stem cell-based treatment produces insulin in patients with Type 1 diabetes
Stem cell-based treatment produces insulin in patients with Type 1 diabetes
Science, Health & Technology Erik Rolfsen In the first study of its kind, a team of researchers at the University of British Columbia's faculty of medicine and Vancouver Coastal Health (VCH) has helped to demonstrate that a stem cell-based treatment delivered through an implantable device can produce insulin in the human body.

Astronomy / Space Science - Life Sciences - 02.12.2021
Preventing 'Alien' Invasions
Preventing ’Alien’ Invasions
The search of life beyond our world is an exciting venture that may yield an enormous discovery in the not-too-distant future. However, space agencies around the world, including NASA and the European Space Agency, have long been aware of the potential risks of biological contamination and have set in place planetary protection policies.

Environment - Life Sciences - 01.12.2021
VUB establishes Global Change Biology
Brussels and other cities as a living lab of ecological change and evolutionary adaptation The Vrije Universiteit Brussel has a new research specialisation in biology.

Environment - Life Sciences - 01.12.2021
Artificial intelligence helps speed up ecological surveys
Artificial intelligence helps speed up ecological surveys
Scientists at EPFL, the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research and Wageningen University & Research have developed a new deep-learning model for counting the number of seals in aerial photos that is considerably faster than doing it by hand. With this new method, valuable time and resources could be saved which can be used to further study and protect endangered species.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.12.2021
Bionic eye study paves the way towards human trials
Bionic eye study paves the way towards human trials
A bionic eye being developed by a team of biomedical researchers at the University of Sydney and UNSW has shown to be safe and stable for long-term implantation in a three-month study, paving the way towards human trials. The Phoenix 99  Bionic Eye is an implantable system, designed to restore a form of vision to patients living with severe vision impairment and blindness caused by degenerative diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.12.2021
Pandemic worriers shown to have impaired general cognitive abilities
The impairments observed may explain poor decisions about COVID-prevention measures The COVID-19 pandemic has tested our psychological limits. Some have been more affected than others by the stress of potential illness and the confusion of constantly changing health information and new restrictions.

Life Sciences - 01.12.2021
When variations in Earth's orbit drive biological evolution
When variations in Earth’s orbit drive biological evolution
Coccolithophores are microscopic algae that form tiny limestone plates, called coccoliths, around their single cells. The shape and size of coccoliths varies according to the species. After their death, coccolithophores sink to the bottom of the ocean and their coccoliths accumulate in sediments, which faithfully record the detailed evolution of these organisms over geological time.

Life Sciences - Physics - 30.11.2021
Flu Virus Shells Could Improve Delivery of mRNA Into Cells
Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new and potentially more effective way to deliver messenger RNA (mRNA) into cells. Their approach involves packing mRNA inside nanoparticles that mimic the flu virus—a naturally efficient vehicle for delivering genetic material such as RNA inside cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.11.2021
’Origami’ diagnostic test could help hepatitis C treatment
A new test for hepatitis C which uses origami-style folded paper to deliver fast, accurate and affordable diagnoses could help the global fight against the deadly virus. The test, developed by biomedical engineers and virologists from the University of Glasgow, delivers lateral-flow results similar to a COVID-19 home test in around 30 minutes.

Life Sciences - 30.11.2021
Diversity in the brain: New genes create new cell types
Diversity in the brain: New genes create new cell types
Through duplication of genetic material cells can acquire new functions. This process may give rise to new cell types with unique properties. A research group at the University of Basel has now been able to demonstrate that gene duplication has generated new cell types in fish, thus supporting a classic theory of evolutionary biology.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.11.2021
Synthetic tissue can repair hearts, muscles, and vocal cords
Synthetic tissue can repair hearts, muscles, and vocal cords
Combining knowledge of chemistry, physics, biology, and engineering, scientists from McGill University develop a biomaterial tough enough to repair the heart, muscles, and vocal cords, representing a major advance in regenerative medicine. "People recovering from heart damage often face a long and tricky journey.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.11.2021
Joining forces to prevent cancer
Joining forces to prevent cancer
Coordinating the waste-management systems of cells is key to keeping organs functioning properly, a study finds. Managing the waste that cells produce is an essential function of the human body, as any defect in its elimination mechanisms can lead to cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Now a Canadian study sheds light on a new mechanism of action of the cellular systems responsible for waste elimination.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 30.11.2021
Nibbling prehistoric herbivore sheds new light on Triassic diversity
Nibbling prehistoric herbivore sheds new light on Triassic diversity
A Triassic herbivore, known for its supposed similarities to a modern-day ostrich, has been revealed to have an entirely different approach to feeding from previously thought, according to research involving UCL and University of Birmingham researchers. The new findings, published in The Anatomical Record , reveal a much broader diversity of herbivore behaviour during the Triassic period than has been recognised to date.

Life Sciences - 29.11.2021
Another step forward in the fight against lower back pain: integrating computer experiments and methods
Research by Laura Baumgartner of the BCN MedTech Unit combines experimental research with mathematical and computational techniques to predict intervertebral disc degeneration. Lower back pain is the most widespread musculoskeletal problem in the population, with a huge economic and social impact. According to data for 2017 , years of living with disability due to lower back pain have increased by more than 50% since 1990, especially in lowand middle-income countries.

Life Sciences - Environment - 29.11.2021
High water loss during hibernation may leave bats vulnerable to population declines
Understanding bat's hibernation patterns can inform prevention and conservation efforts as white-nose syndrome spreads in North America When it comes to hibernation, conserving resources is key for an animal's survival. For bats of Western North America, water may be the key to assessing a bat species' ability to thrive during hibernation.

Life Sciences - Environment - 29.11.2021
Monkeys go fishing to survive harsh Japanese winters
Monkeys go fishing to survive harsh Japanese winters
Snow monkeys living in one of the world's coldest regions survive by 'going fishing' - scooping live animals, including brown trout, out of Japanese rivers and eating them to stay alive, a new study reveals. The snow monkey (Japanese macaque Macaca fuscata) is native to the main islands of Japan, except Hokkaido.

Life Sciences - 29.11.2021
Ancient lineage of algae found to include five 'cryptic' species
Ancient lineage of algae found to include five ’cryptic’ species
Research team led by Göttingen University use genomic data to discover five species hidden in rare alga All land plants originated from a single evolutionary event when freshwater algae got a foothold on land, giving rise to an astonishing biodiversity of plants on earth. However, the group of algae that would later give rise to land plants had already been living and evolving in both freshwater and terrestrial habitats for over one billion years.

Life Sciences - Environment - 29.11.2021
Extent of migration of sooty terns presents conservation challenges
Sooty terns' wide ranging migration patterns present big challenges for conservationists working to understand and address a sharp population decline, according to scientists at the University of Birmingham. The team used GLS ('geolocator') tracking data to show the migration patterns of sooty terns from the largest breeding population of terns in the Atlantic, based on Ascension Island in the southern Atlantic Ocean.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.11.2021
Wyss Center and Inselspital Bern announce clinical trial for long-term brain monitoring technology
Early clinical study will assess safety and feasibility of the Epios(TM) subscalp recording leads in epilepsy patients Geneva, Switzerland - Brain signal recording with the Wyss Center for Bio and Neuroengineering's subscalp Epios(TM) sensing electrodes (leads) is being carried out for the first time in patients at the University Hospital Bern, Inselspital.