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Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 22.12.2021
World's oldest family tree provides new insights into kinship and burial practices in Neolithic times
World’s oldest family tree provides new insights into kinship and burial practices in Neolithic times
By analyzing ancient DNA an international team of scientists with participation of Ron Pinhasi's team of the University of Vienna was able to retrace the world's oldest family tree. They took samples from a Neolithic tomb in Britain. In their study published they reveal undiscovered information about the structure of prehistoric families.

Social Sciences - 21.12.2021
Relationship satisfaction at its lowest point after 10 years
Relationship satisfaction at its lowest point after 10 years
For most people, satisfaction in a relationship changes over time. Researchers at the Institute of Psychology, University of Bern have, for the first time, managed to identify typical developmental trajectories, both over a person's life span and over the duration of a relationship. The study shows that average satisfaction in a relationship is at its lowest at the age of 40 and after 10 years of being in a relationship.

Social Sciences - 20.12.2021
How populists’ election results lead to far-right demonstrations
In liberal-leaning municipalities, there is an increased probability of far-right demonstrations in the wake of unexpectedly strong election results by right-wing populists. This is one of the insights from an investigation based on electoral results of the AfD party in Germany. The study reveals a surprise effect on the part of people who previously believed that their attitudes were less socially acceptable.

Social Sciences - 17.12.2021
Researchers write the first global report on sexual violence in Spain
Researchers write the first global report on sexual violence in Spain
UB researchers have written, required by the Spanish Ministry of Home Affairs, a report on sexual violence in Spain which gathers and analyses the existing data in order to provide a global view of the phenomenon. The authors of the study used official figures, such as the number of reports and sentences, and several published surveys and researches on this issue, among other sources.

Social Sciences - Environment - 17.12.2021
Dying in the desert: How U.S. border policies contribute to migrant mortality
A 5-year-old child will probably die first. Then a nonpregnant woman, followed by a grown man and finally a pregnant woman. This macabre list isn't some analysis of horror films — it's an all-too-real ranking of how likely migrants are to perish from dehydration and exposure as they traverse the most unforgiving routes through the Sonoran Desert near the Mexico-Arizona border.

Social Sciences - 17.12.2021
Endangered languages at high risk
Endangered languages at high risk
A world-first study warns 1,500 endangered languages could be lost by the end of this century. The study, from The Australian National University (ANU) and The University of Queensland, identified a range of factors that put endangered languages at high risk. Co-author Professor Felicity Meakins from UQ's School of Languages and Cultures said the diversity of the world's languages was truly breathtaking, but is under great threat.

Health - Social Sciences - 17.12.2021
How did lockdown affect people’s sex lives in Britain?
Lockdown affected people's sex lives in a variety of different ways with young people and those not living with a partner reporting the greatest changes, according to researchers from UCL, the University of Glasgow and the National Centre for Social Research (NatCen). The peer-reviewed paper, which is the largest national study of sexual behaviours since the beginning of the pandemic, is published today in BMJ Sexually Transmitted Infections.

Social Sciences - 16.12.2021
1,500 endangered languages at high risk
1,500 endangered languages at high risk
A world-first study warns 1,500 endangered languages could no longer be spoken by the end of this century.             The study, led by The Australian National University (ANU), identified predictors that put endangered languages at high risk. Co-author Professor Lindell Bromham said that of the world's 7,000 recognised languages, around half were currently endangered.

Social Sciences - 16.12.2021
Gentrification changes the personality make-up of cities in just a few years
Gentrification changes the personality make-up of cities in just a few years
Massive study of almost two million US residents reveals rising housing costs may drive increases in "openness" of character among both long-term and new inhabitants of a city. Substantial personality shifts within cities can and do occur within a couple of years Jason Rentfrow Rising house prices may change the personality make-up of US cities within a few years, with residents becoming increasingly open-minded - not just as wealthier people move in, but also among longer-term locals.

Social Sciences - Environment - 16.12.2021
Loneliness within older adults is more than the stereotype
In recent years, a lot of attention has been paid to loneliness in old age. Recent international studies show that 25% to 62% of elderly people experience occasional feelings of loneliness. However, the issue does not suddenly appear when one is old. Lise Switsers' doctoral research at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel showed the importance of looking at loneliness from a life-course perspective: "It's one of the many stereotypes that only older adults are lonely.

Social Sciences - Health - 15.12.2021
Perceived police bias, community violence amplify youth firearm carriage, U-M study shows
Results show that 14% of participants carried a firearm within the past 90 days, mostly for protection Nearly two-thirds of all violence-related deaths among adolescents and young adults across the United States are caused by firearms. In an effort to reduce firearm injuries and deaths, a team of researchers at the University of Michigan are partnering with hospitals and communities to better understand what motivates young people to carry firearms.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 14.12.2021
The power of a mother's scent
The power of a mother’s scent
Maternal pheromones play an important role in infant sociability, according to a new study at CHU Sainte-Justine. Maternal pheromones enhance synchrony between the infant's and the mother's brains, suggesting their role in the development of the baby's "social instinct" and opening the door to new therapeutic strategies for developmental disorders.

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 14.12.2021
Equal at birth and in death
Equal at birth and in death
When baby 'Neve' died 10,000 years ago, she was accorded a proper burial recognizing her as a full person, archeologists on a dig in Italy find. The baby girl was born roughly 10,000 years ago, after the end of the last Ice Age in what is now Liguria, northwestern Italy, but didn't survive more than two months.

Computer Science - Social Sciences - 10.12.2021
Community of ethical hackers needed to prevent AI's looming 'crisis of trust'
Community of ethical hackers needed to prevent AI’s looming ’crisis of trust’
A global hacker "red team" and rewards for hunting algorithmic biases are just some of the recommendations from experts who argue that AI faces a "tech-lash" unless firm measures are taken to increase public trust. We need policy and public support to create an ecosystem of trust for AI Shahar Avin The Artificial Intelligence industry should create a global community of hackers and "threat modellers" dedicated to stress-testing the harm potential of new AI products in order to earn the trust of governments and the public before it's too late.

Social Sciences - 10.12.2021
Low-income kids use different brain function to ace achievement tests
New study finds that the brain activity that supports academic achievement is not one-size-fits-all. (iStockphoto) A common stereotype is that growing up poor can stunt brain development due to adverse environmental conditions. But on a positive note, new UC Berkeley research suggests that children's brains can adapt in different ways to socioeconomic challenges and excel.

Health - Social Sciences - 09.12.2021
Study dispels harmful gender dysphoria myth
A first-of-its-kind study by Schulich Medicine & Dentistry researchers dispels a controversial gender dysphoria theory that activists and experts have called inaccurate and harmful to transgender people. Greta Bauer, PhD, and her team at Trans Youth CAN! found no evidence in a recent study to support the idea of rapid onset gender dysphoria (ROGD) - a proposed condition often used as an argument against providing gender-affirming medical care to young people.

Social Sciences - Economics / Business - 09.12.2021
Tackling oil and gas sector abuses: new findings show how corporations can do better on human rights
Tackling oil and gas sector abuses: new findings show how corporations can do better on human rights
Companies must walk the talk: human rights policies must be backed by deeper engagement Multinational corporations must go beyond simply adopting human rights policies if they are to stop human rights abuses in their supply chains and avoid charges of ethical window-dressing, new research from the University of Bath School of Management shows.

Social Sciences - 30.11.2021
Domestic violence goes unrecognised in faith communities
Australians who are frequently involved in religion and who identify as religious are less likely to acknowledge domestic violence is an issue within their faith community, despite acknowledging it as a national issue, a new study has found.

Criminology / Forensics - Social Sciences - 30.11.2021
Child's gender influences crime rates in young fathers and their peers
Child’s gender influences crime rates in young fathers and their peers
The gender of a young father's firstborn child affects the likelihood of both him and his friends committing crime, a UCL-led study has found. For the first time, researchers established that young fathers who have a firstborn son rather than a daughter are convicted of fewer crimes in subsequent years, and crucially that this reduction also leads to a drop in criminal convictions among peers living in the same neighbourhood.

Environment - Social Sciences - 29.11.2021
The superfoods that fueled ancient Andeans through 2,500 years of turmoil
What if Indigenous diets could save our politically and ecologically strained planet? The answer may lie in the success of an ancient civilization high in the Andes Mountains, where not much grows. UC Berkeley archaeologists reconstructed the diets of ancient Andeans living around Lake Titicaca, which straddles Bolivia and Peru 12,500 feet above sea level.
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