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Chemistry - Physics - 21.01.2022
Researchers design an artificial light-fuelled molecular machine
Researchers design an artificial light-fuelled molecular machine
A molecular machine is a series of molecules that can conduct different mechanical movements as a response to a stimulus. This is a key structure for the development of different cellular functions. Professor Lluďsa Pérez-García, from the Faculty of Pharmacy and Food Sciences of the UB, took part in an international research led by the University of Nottingham, which has created a light-controlled artificial molecular machine.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.01.2022
Scientist receives grant for promising Alzheimer research
Researcher returns from US with state-of-the-art knowledge Friday, January 21, 2022 — VUB scientist Gamze Ates has been awarded ¤100,000 for research into Alzheimer's disease.

Environment - 21.01.2022
Air pollution significantly reduces pollination by confusing butterflies and bees
Air pollution significantly reduces pollination by confusing butterflies and bees
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email Common air pollutants from both urban and rural environments may be reducing the pollinating abilities of insects by preventing them from sniffing out the crops and wildflowers that depend on them, new research has shown.

Health - Psychology - 21.01.2022
Escalation of eating disorders during COVID-19
A major study by InsideOut Institute for Eating Disorders at the University of Sydney reveals a widespread escalation of eating disorder symptoms during COVID-19 lockdown in Australia, with 40 percent going undiagnosed.

Materials Science - Physics - 21.01.2022
Nanobubbles a pathway to better medical devices
Nanobubbles a pathway to better medical devices
Tiny gas bubbles could help reduce drag in small medical devices, university scientists have found. Drag can lead to clogging and damage biological samples, so this discovery could pave the way to more robust devices. Researchers from the University of Sydney Nano Institute and School of Chemistry have revealed that tiny gas bubbles - nanobubbles just 100 billionths of a metre high - form on surfaces in unexpected situations, providing a new way to reduce drag in small-scale devices.

Physics - 21.01.2022
Neutrons detect clogs in pipelines
Neutrons detect clogs in pipelines
Industry and private consumers alike depend on oil and gas pipelines that stretch thousands of kilometers underwater. It is not uncommon for these pipelines to become clogged with deposits. Until now, there have been few means of identifying the formation of plugs in-situ and non-destructively. Measurements at the Research Neutron Source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) now show that neutrons may provide the solution of choice.

Physics - Materials Science - 21.01.2022
Quantum dots boost perovskite solar cell efficiency and scalability
Scientists at EPFL have boosted the efficiency and scalability of perovskite solar cells by replacing their electron-transport layers with a thin layer of quantum dots. Perovskites are hybrid compounds made from metal halides and organic constituents. They show great potential in a range of applications, e.g. LED lights, lasers, and photodetectors, but their major contribution is in solar cells, where they are poised to overtake the market from their silicon counterparts.

Health - 21.01.2022
Lockdowns during early pandemic saved lives, but not a go-to strategy moving forward
The U.S. pandemic lockdown in 2020 caused a $2.3 trillion economic downturn and split the nation politically, and now some European nations are locking down again as Omicron surges through the global population.

Sport - Health - 20.01.2022
Aerobic fitness of elite soccer players linked to player positions
Returning to in-person experiences in February: for more information. New study findings can help coaches regulate individual training loads based on player position Researchers have linked the fitness of elite soccer players to the positions they play. The ability to make this assessment can help coaches regulate individual training loads based on player position, according to a recent study.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 20.01.2022
Mount Etna's exceptional CO2 emissions are triggered by deep carbon dioxide reservoirs
Mount Etna’s exceptional CO2 emissions are triggered by deep carbon dioxide reservoirs
The transport of carbon dioxide stored in the Earth's lithospheric mantle beneath the Hyblean Plateau in southern Italy at a depth of approximately 50 to 150 kilometres is responsible for the exceptionally large CO2 emission of Mount Etna. That is the result of research conducted by an international team of geologists, including researchers from the Universities of Florence (Italy) and Cologne , and from the Istituto di Geologia Ambientale e Geoingegneria of the Italian National Research Council (CNR).

Linguistics / Literature - 20.01.2022
'Rough' words feature a trill sound in languages around the globe - study
’Rough’ words feature a trill sound in languages around the globe - study
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email In languages spoken around the world, words describing rough surfaces are highly likely to feature a 'trilled /r/' sound - a linguistic pattern that stretches back over 6,000 years, a new study reveals. Language scientists first analysed words for 'rough' and 'smooth' in a worldwide sample of 332 spoken languages - discovering a strong link between the sounds of speech and the sense of touch, which has influenced the structure of modern languages.

Environment - Architecture - 20.01.2022
Sustainable, affordable housing is possible with adaptable houses
VUB research explores potential of low-cost, low-carbon, flexible living spaces Sustainable building and affordable housing: two concepts that seem mutually exclusive.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.01.2022
What lies beneath COVID-19 inflammation
What lies beneath COVID-19 inflammation
Scientists at EPFL and the University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV) have found the biological mechanism behind the inflammation seen in COVID-19 infections that involve a rise in interferons in the lungs and skin. As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, scientists across the world are looking at the pathology of the SARS-CoV-2 virus in an effort to find effective treatments for patients.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 20.01.2022
Researchers investigate advantages of sulphur-containing cathodes
Researchers investigate advantages of sulphur-containing cathodes
MEET Battery Research Center of the University of Münster starts a new research project in 2022: In the joint project -AReLiS-2-, lithium-sulfur batteries (LSB) and thus a potential successor to today's lithium ion batteries are being investigated. The focus of the research is on sulfur-containing cathodes as well as polymer, solid-state and hybrid electrolytes.

Life Sciences - Environment - 20.01.2022
Branching worm discovered in Japan named after Godzilla's nemesis
Branching worm discovered in Japan named after Godzilla’s nemesis
International team led by Göttingen University describe new species Ramisyllis kingghidorahi Branching marine worms are bizarre creatures with one head but a body that branches over and over again into multiple posterior ends. Until now, only two species of these curious beasts, thought to be extremely rare, were known.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.01.2022
Attack on the malaria parasite cytoskeleton
Attack on the malaria parasite cytoskeleton
Researchers succeeded in the purification of Plasmodium "tubulin", the molecular building block of cytoskeletal filaments - an important step in the search for novel anti-malarials Despite all efforts, malaria remains one of the deadliest diseases with an estimated 240.000.000 cases and more than 600.000 fatalities in 2020 alone.

Physics - Computer Science - 20.01.2022
Towards compact quantum computers, thanks to topology
Towards compact quantum computers, thanks to topology
Researchers at PSI have compared the electron distribution below the oxide layer of two semiconductors. The investigation is part of an effort to develop particularly stable quantum bits -and thus, in turn, particularly efficient quantum computers. They have now published their latest research, which is supported in part by Microsoft, in the scientific journal Advanced Quantum Technologies .

Social Sciences - Innovation - 20.01.2022
A new digital gap in internet usage between rich and poor people has been detected
Social networks are used more often in poor neighbourhoods than in affluent neighbourhoods, while the latter tend to consume more information from traditional online media. This is one of the conclusions of a scientific study undertaken by researchers at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), the IMDEA Networks Institute, and Orange Innovation which analyses the relationship between internet usage and variables such as education, income, or inequality in a specific area.

Health - 20.01.2022
Dementia: how to prevent cognitive decline
Dementia: how to prevent cognitive decline
Researchers at the UdeM-affiliated Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal have determined the optimal number of intervention sessions needed to prevent cognitive decline in people at risk. Physical activity, nutrition and cognitively stimulating activities are all known to be good ways to prevent Alzheimer's disease and dementia.

Health - 20.01.2022
Magnesium is essential for the immune system, including in the fight against cancer
The level of magnesium in the blood is an important factor in the immune system's ability to tackle pathogens and cancer cells. Writing in the journal Cell, a research group from the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel with Bernese participation have reported that T cells need a sufficient quantity of magnesium in order to operate efficiently.
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