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Health - Pharmacology - 08.02.2022
Ebola vaccine being used in Congo produces lasting antibody response
Ebola vaccine being used in Congo produces lasting antibody response
FINDINGS A new study by UCLA researchers and colleagues demonstrates that the Ebola vaccine known as rVSVΔG-ZEBOV-GP results in a robust and enduring antibody response among vaccinated individuals in areas of the Democratic Republic of Congo that are experiencing outbreaks of the disease. Among the more than 600 study participants, 95.6% demonstrated antibody persistence six months after they received the vaccine.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.02.2022
Alcohol Use Linked to Lower Connectivity in Brain Areas that Process Emotions
Persons at risk of developing alcohol use disorder show less communication between brain areas involved in social and emotional processing; UC San Diego study may inspire new interventions to prevent disordered drinking People predisposed to heavy drinking and alcohol problems may have lower functional connectivity — the patterns of signaling between brain areas — in regions that process emotions and social situations.

Life Sciences - Environment - 08.02.2022
Rare rockcress species in the Rhine meadows seem able to prevent their own extinction
In the floodplains of the Rhine River near the city of Mainz, two different rockcress species are intercrossing. This results in a mixed population with higher genetic diversity, where a kind of 'super genotype' consisting of a patchwork of the two populations could emerge, ensuring the survival of the two species.

Health - 08.02.2022
Kidney failure in childhood: Gender influences survival chances
Kidney failure in childhood: Gender influences survival chances
MHH study: Vessels of girls suffer more damage than those of boys Gender plays a role: chronic kidney disease has a greater effect on the vessels of girls than on those of boys. Researchers at the Hannover Medical School (MHH) have now been able to show this in a European study. Although the mortality rate in children after kidney transplantation has fallen in recent decades, it is still very high compared to the general population due to early cardiovascular complications.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.02.2022
How a fungus hijacks our immune system
How a fungus hijacks our immune system
During infection, the yeast Candida albicans stimulates the release of tiny RNA fragments, which then stimulate its own growth. An international research team led by the Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology - Hans Knöll Institute (Leibniz-HKI) in Jena has discovered this unusual exploitation of the human immune system.

Environment - 08.02.2022
Arctic Winter Warming Causes Cold Damage in the Subtropics of East Asia
Arctic Winter Warming Causes Cold Damage in the Subtropics of East Asia
Due to climate change, Arctic winters are getting warmer. An international study by researchers shows that Arctic warming causes temperature anomalies and cold damage thousands of kilometers away in East Asia. This in turn leads to reduced vegetation growth, later blossoming, smaller harvests and reduced CO2 absorption by the forests in the region.

Life Sciences - 08.02.2022
Natural mineral may reverse memory loss
Natural mineral may reverse memory loss
Selenium - a mineral found in many foods - could reverse the cognitive impact of stroke and boost learning and memory in ageing brains, according to University of Queensland research. Queensland Brain Institute (QBI) lead researcher Dr Tara Walker said studies on the impact of exercise on the ageing brain found levels of a protein key to transporting selenium in the blood were elevated by physical activity.

Environment - Social Sciences - 08.02.2022
Citizen Science: Knowledge as a weapon in the fight for clean water
Citizen Science: Knowledge as a weapon in the fight for clean water
There is too much nickel, too much arsenic and far too much manganese. The research project by Désirée Ruppen, who is doing her doctorate at the aquatic research institute Eawag and the ETH Zurich, provides watertight proof for the first time of what everyone on the ground already knew. The Deka River in the Hwange district is heavily polluted by coal mining and the coal-fired power plant, and is a serious health risk for the people who drink its water or fish in it.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.02.2022
Genome of Steller’s Sea Cow Decoded
During the Ice Age, giant mammals such as mammoths, sabre-toothed cats and woolly rhinoceroses once roamed Northern Europe and America. The cold oceans of the northern hemisphere were also home to giants like Steller's sea cow, which grew up to eight metres long and weighed up to ten tonnes, and has been extinct for around 250 years.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.02.2022
A protein present in the gum may help prevent Alzheimer's
A protein present in the gum may help prevent Alzheimer’s
A research team affiliated with the Faculty of Dentistry at UdeM has shed new light on a human protein with potential benefits beyond oral and dental health. Recent studies have shown that a protein present in the gingival epithelium (the part of the gums that surrounds the teeth) may have antimicrobial properties, in particular against the bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.

Environment - Social Sciences - 08.02.2022
International land use scientists urge policymakers to adopt new approaches to addressing climate change, biodiversity and other global crises
New study IDs "10 Facts" about global land use and details opportunities for a more sustainable and equitable approach A new report released today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) is a call to action for policymakers worldwide seeking to develop sustainable and equitable solutions to our most urgent global challenges.

Health - Social Sciences - 08.02.2022
Altitude Positively Impacts Cardiovascular Health Peruvian Study Finds
Altitude Positively Impacts Cardiovascular Health Peruvian Study Finds
People living in high altitudes are less likely to develop metabolic syndrome, a key indicator of cardiovascular health. A study published today in PLOS One investigated the association between the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and the use of improved cook stoves in the rural Andes in Peru. While the use of these stoves was not found to be related to better metabolic health, body mass index (BMI) and altitude appear to be strong determinants of metabolic syndrome.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 08.02.2022
Microgravity experiments could help future space missions source oxygen
New research on generating oxygen from water found on the surfaces of other planets could help support future long-term missions to the Moon and Mars. Researchers from the University of Glasgow and colleagues took a series of gruelling flights into microgravity to study how the different gravitational pull of other planets could affect the process of electrolysis.

Social Sciences - 08.02.2022
Our mathematical reasoning is shaped by language and culture
Benjamin Pitt, a postdoctoral fellow in UC Berkeley's Computation and Language Lab, has found that language and culture shape the way we think about and organize numbers (Photo illustration by Yasmin Anwar) Some cultures are fixated on numbers. Others don't even have words for numbers. And then there's Bolivia's Indigenous Tsimane' community, which has members who can count indefinitely, and others who can't count beyond the "number words" they know, according to a new UC Berkeley study.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.02.2022
Adoption of E-cigarettes for Smoking Cessation in 2017 Low and Ineffective
Smokers using e-cigarettes to quit were less likely to succeed than those who used other aids Despite the rapid growth in sales of e-cigarettes in 2017, researchers at the Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science at University of California San Diego say smokers seeking to quit were not early adopters of the products.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.02.2022
Researchers identify molecule that connects cognitive performance to metabolism
Researchers identify molecule that connects cognitive performance to metabolism
Obesity or diabetes, among other metabolic disorders, can produce cognitive impairment. Molecular bases and brain areas involved in this relation are not studied enough, but now, a study published in the journal Cell Metabolism reveals the involvement of a molecule and a brain region in this process of cognitive skill loss.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 07.02.2022
Understanding tomorrow’s Arctic
Hundreds of international researchers are currently analysing observations from the year-long MOSAiC expedition, during which hundreds of environmental parameters were recorded with unprecedented accuracy and frequency over a full annual cycle in the central Arctic Ocean. Three review articles on the MOSAiC programmes for atmosphere, snow and sea ice, and ocean have now been published in the journal Elementa, highlighting the importance of looking at all components of the climate system together.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.02.2022
Lab results show promise for future pancreatic cancer treatment
Lab results show promise for future pancreatic cancer treatment
University of Illinois Chicago researchers have developed a compound that may one day offer hope for pancreatic cancer treatment. A pre-clinical study of the experimental compound shows that it more than doubles the average survival time for mice with pancreatic cancer, and that survival time was extended further when combined with immunotherapy.

Materials Science - Innovation - 07.02.2022
New adaptable smart window coating could help heat or cool a home and save energy
New adaptable smart window coating could help heat or cool a home and save energy
Researchers at the University of Oxford have collaborated with industry experts to develop an adaptable smart window technology that could reduce the energy usage of an average home by up to a third. The new glass has a spectrally tuneable low-emissivity coating that uses a phase change material to control the amount of heat that comes into the room from the window, without affecting the quality of the light.

Social Sciences - 07.02.2022
Impact of Covid-19 social isolation measures on early development
Impact of Covid-19 social isolation measures on early development
International research team investigates impact of lockdown measures on 8- to 36-month-old infants across 13 countries An international consortium with researchers from 13 countries has investigated the impact of Covid-19 related social isolation measures on 2,200 young infants and toddlers between 8 and 36 months of age.