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Results 1881 - 1900 of 2317.


Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 10.02.2022
Illuminating Real-Time Brain Dynamics of Neuropeptides with a Fluorescent Biosensor
Illuminating Real-Time Brain Dynamics of Neuropeptides with a Fluorescent Biosensor
Neuropeptides play fundamental roles in modulating cellular and circuit functions within the brain. One such signaling molecule - orexin - regulates arousal and wakefulness, and its failure can lead to constant daytime sleepiness (narcolepsy). University of Zurich researchers have now developed a fluorescent orexin biosensor to observe this molecule "live" in the living mouse brain.

Health - 10.02.2022
Problematic levels of loneliness widespread in many countries
Loneliness at a problematic level is widespread in many countries, finds a University of Sydney led analysis of evidence from 2000 to 2019 across 113 countries and territories. The findings, published in The BMJ today, identify important data gaps, particularly in lowand middle-income countries, and substantial geographical variation in loneliness, with northern European countries consistently showing lower levels compared with other regions.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 10.02.2022
Biodiversity is facing the repayment of debts and credits
Biodiversity is facing the repayment of debts and credits
A new method suggests that past landscape changes can cast a shadow on future bird biodiversity, leading to avian communities facing impeding species extinctions, as well as the arrival of new colonising species. The study revealed widespread extinction debts and colonisation credits in USA bird biodiversity.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.02.2022
Calorie restriction trial reveals key factors in enhancing human health
Decades of research has shown that limits on calorie intake by flies, worms, and mice can enhance life span in laboratory conditions. But whether such calorie restriction can do the same for humans remains unclear. Now a new study led by Yale researchers confirms the health benefits of moderate calorie restrictions in humans - and identifies a key protein that could be harnessed to extend health in humans.

Health - 10.02.2022
After COVID-19 illness, Michiganders experienced increased disabilities
Michigan residents who were sick with COVID-19 in 2020 were almost twice as likely to experience disability following their illness, according to the latest report from the Michigan COVID-19 Recovery Surveillance Study. The study, which has been following the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Michiganders, also showed that nearly 1 in 3 Black respondents reported a mobility disability after their COVID-19 illness.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.02.2022
Calorie restriction trial reveals key factors in extending human health
Decades of research has shown that limits on calorie intake by flies, worms, and mice can enhance life span in laboratory conditions. But whether such calorie restriction can do the same for humans remains unclear. Now a new study led by Yale researchers confirms the health benefits of moderate calorie restrictions in humans - and identifies a key protein that could be harnessed to extend health in humans.

Politics - 09.02.2022
Large majority of citizens trust science
Large majority of citizens trust science
The Corona pandemic has not only impinged on daily life around the world for around two years now - it is increasingly shifting science and research into the focus of public debate. One aspect is the trust people have in the work done by scientists. A team of researchers led by Prof. Rainer Bromme, a psychologist at the University of Münster, now have published a study, which concludes that science has so far passed the pandemic stress test of public trust in science.

Mechanical Engineering - 09.02.2022
Unlocking the mechanical secrets of giant Amazonian waterlilies
Unlocking the mechanical secrets of giant Amazonian waterlilies
Researchers studying giant Amazonian waterlilies have unravelled the engineering enigma behind the largest floating leaves in nature . In a study published today in Science Advances , researchers found that the distinctive pattern on the underside of the gargantuan leaves is the secret to the success of the giant Amazonian waterlily (genus Victoria ).

Physics - 09.02.2022
Rougher is more slippery
Rougher is more slippery
Understanding roughness and friction at the nanoscale 9 February 2022 The amount of friction between surfaces generally depends on their roughness, but at the nanoscale 'rough' surfaces experience less friction than smoother surfaces. With a unique experimental setup, researchers at ARCNL and the University of Amsterdam were able to image surface roughness with nanoscale accuracy and relate these measurements to friction experiments that confirm this counter-intuitive fact, which is caused by capillary effects.

Health - Mathematics - 09.02.2022
Computer model shows the best ways to slow the spread of COVID-19
Computer model shows the best ways to slow the spread of COVID-19
Researchers simulate the transmission of variants and effects of health measures By Researchers at the University of Waterloo created the first computational model that simulates many variables affecting the transmission of COVID-19 to slow the spread of variants. The model takes raw data already in use to forecast case numbers and hospitalizations, and then adds other factors, such as vaccination rates, the use of masks and lockdowns, and the number of breakthrough infections.

Environment - Computer Science - 09.02.2022
Artificial intelligence and big data can help preserve wildlife
Artificial intelligence and big data can help preserve wildlife
A team of experts in artificial intelligence and animal ecology have put forth a new, cross-disciplinary approach intended to enhance research on wildlife species and make more effective use of the vast amounts of data now being collected thanks to new technology. Their study appears today. The field of animal ecology has entered the era of big data and the Internet of Things.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.02.2022
Complex evolutionary history of SARS-related coronaviruses disentangled
Complex evolutionary history of SARS-related coronaviruses disentangled
New research has disentangled the complex evolutionary history of bat coronaviruses related to SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19. Scientists agree that bats are the most likely animal host species of SARS-CoV-2 viral ancestors, however no one has yet been able to fully explain the virus's history or pinpoint the animal species that ultimately passed the new coronavirus to humans.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 09.02.2022
Seismometer technology field-tested in Antarctica before space missions
Seismometer technology field-tested in Antarctica before space missions
Scientists from the University of Oxford are field-testing seismic sensors in the bitter conditions of Antarctica to simulate the solar system's icy moons. The Antarctic deployment is the first in what is hoped to be a series of extreme environment tests for the short-period (SP) sensor - a seismometer that records the high-frequency (high pitched) seismic waves generated by movement in the ice sheets.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 09.02.2022
A new electrolyte for greener and safer batteries
A new electrolyte for greener and safer batteries
A team from the University of Geneva has developed a new material that improves the performance of solid-state sodium batteries, a less dangerous and more durable alternative to lithium. The future of battery technologies lies in sodium. More sustainable than lithium - which currently powers most of our devices and vehicles - sodium is also abundant on the earth's surface.

Life Sciences - Physics - 09.02.2022
Hungry for Love: Gut Molecule Discovered that Flips the Feeding-to-Mating Switch
Nature report uncovers the Dh31 signaling molecule, opening a new paradigm of gut-to-brain communication On Valentine's Day, couples all over the world will enjoy romantic dinners to celebrate love and relationships. The association between nutrition and mating is not unique to humans but is reflected across species throughout the animal kingdom.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.02.2022
Mapping Mutation ’Hotspots’ in Cancer Reveals New Drivers and Biomarkers
Researchers led by bioengineers at the University of California San Diego have identified and characterized a previously unrecognized key player in cancer evolution: clusters of mutations occurring at certain regions of the genome. The researchers found that these mutation clusters contribute to the progression of about 10% of human cancers and can be used to predict patient survival.

Materials Science - Physics - 09.02.2022
New thermofluidic process for lab-on-a-chip applications
New thermofluidic process for lab-on-a-chip applications
Researchers at Leipzig University have succeeded in moving tiny amounts of liquid at will by remotely heating water over a metal film with a laser. The currents generated in this way can be used to manipulate and even capture tiny objects. This will unlock groundbreaking new solutions for nanotechnology, the manipulation of liquids in systems in tiny spaces, or in the field of diagnostics, by making it possible to detect the smallest concentrations of substances with new types of sensor systems.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.02.2022
Largest catalogue of gene activators
Largest catalogue of gene activators
University of Toronto researchers have created a first-in-class functional catalogue of proteins that activate gene expression, with implications for tailored therapy for cancer and other diseases that occur when wrong genes are switched on. Also known as transcriptional activators for their ability to induce transcription of genes into RNA messages, these proteins are essential for the cells to function properly.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.02.2022
Gut bacteria linked to immune suppression in pancreatic cancer: Study
Gut bacteria linked to immune suppression in pancreatic cancer: Study
Researchers at the University Health Network (UHN) and University of Toronto have shown how probiotic bacteria in the gut could undermine immunity in pancreatic cancer, pointing toward more personalized cancer treatments. Lactobacillus  - a type of bacteria thought to promote gut health - can alter the function of immune cells called macrophages in the pancreatic tumour environment and spur cancer growth, the researchers found.

Health - Social Sciences - 09.02.2022
School location triggers inequitable impact of COVID-19: study
Western team discovered schools in marginalized areas in Ontario were more negatively affected by the pandemic than other areas COVID-19 infections in Ontario are disproportionately concentrated in areas with lower-income and racialized groups. A new study shows the devastating impact that inequity poses for schools, students and families in those communities.