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Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 12.04.2022
Sorghum mutants breed crop innovation for food security
Sorghum mutants breed crop innovation for food security
A crop of half a million genetically diverse sorghum plants growing at The University of Queensland's Gatton campus will help future-proof cereal production in a changing climate. UQ's Professor Robert Henry said the crop would reinvent the way producers use mutagenesis, a conventional plant breeding technique that mimicked nature.

Health - 12.04.2022
Mobile device use can help or hinder bonding with babies in the womb
New Curtin research has found how and why parents used mobile devices during pregnancy was an important factor in whether or not that use helped them feel closer to their unborn baby. Lead author, Curtin PhD candidate Rebecca Hood from Curtin's School of Allied Health, said interviews with Western Australian parents revealed that looking at pregnancy information and Apps on their phone or tablet helped many parents-to-be feel connected to their baby, by giving them a better idea of what was going on.

Physics - Health - 12.04.2022
Solar nanowire-nanotube filter offers easy access to clean water
Solar nanowire-nanotube filter offers easy access to clean water
Scientists at EPFL have developed a highly efficient water purification filter that uses only solar power. The prototype can supply clean drinking water even at remote places to small populations and can be easily scaled-up. Even today, clean water is a privilege for many people across the world. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), at least 1.8 billion people consume water contaminated with feces, and by 2040, a large portion of the world will endure water stress because of insufficient resources of drinking water.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.04.2022
Omicron: Number of vaccine breakthroughs in cancer patients on the rise
For cancer patients, Covid-19 poses a particular risk due to their often compromised immune systems, weakened by therapy or disease, which is why vaccination is very important for their protection. Now, a recent study led by MedUni Vienna shows that, due to Omicron, there is an increasing number of breakthrough infections in people with cancer, especially while they are undergoing cancer therapy.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.04.2022
Largest study of its kind links specific genes to schizophrenia
In the largest study so far conducted into schizophrenia, which included more than 320,000 participants, scientists from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC), a group of several hundred researchers from 45 countries, identified a large number of genes that may play a significant role in the disorder.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.04.2022
A research published in Nature identifies 120 new genes related to schizophrenia
A research published in Nature identifies 120 new genes related to schizophrenia
A research published in Nature identifies 120 new genes related to schizophrenia An international study with the participation of M. Dolores Moltó and Julio Sanjuán, researchers at the University of Valencia (UV) and the INCLIVA Health Research Institute, has identified 120 genes related to schizophrenia.

Health - Physics - 12.04.2022
What is causing the rise in black lung disease?
What is causing the rise in black lung disease?
Silica exposure is a driving force behind rising rates of coal workers- pneumoconiosis, according to a new study published by occupational health experts at the University of Illinois Chicago and their collaborators. The study is the first to compare the pathology and mineralogy of the disease, which is commonly called black lung disease, across generations.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.04.2022
COVID-19: Vaccination greatly reduces infectious viral load
By comparing the infectious viral load caused by ancestral SARS-CoV-2 as well as by the Delta and Omicron variants, scientists from the University of Geneva and HUG highlight the benefits of vaccination. To conduct the research, the UNIGE and HUG team was able to reanalyze samples from previous waves of the disease.

Environment - 12.04.2022
Recovering energy from faeces
Recovering energy from faeces
The difference couldn't be starker: In Switzerland, 97 per cent of households are connected to central wastewater treatment plants, whereas three billion people worldwide have no connection to a sewage system at all - predominantly in low-income countries. Understandably, these two very different realities call for different solutions when it comes to sewage disposal.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.04.2022
How Covid-19 triggers massive inflammation revealed
How Covid-19 triggers massive inflammation revealed
The reasons why Covid-19 causes severe inflammation in some people, leading to acute respiratory distress and multi-organ damage, has been revealed in a new study involving a UCL scientist. Published in Nature , the study led by researchers at Boston Children's Hospital (US) , found evidence that the virus might activate inflammasomes, large molecules that trigger a cascade of inflammatory responses that ends in cell death.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.04.2022
Inflammation, not the virus itself, causes COVID-19-related loss of smell
Study: Inflammation, not the virus itself, causes COVID-19-related loss of smell New research suggests the virus does not infect the nerves of the olfactory bulb but causes inflammation of the tissue, reducing the number of nerves able to transmit signals to the brain Anosmia, the loss of smell, is a frequent and often long-term symptom associated with COVID-19 that can severely burden a person's quality of life, making it extremely difficult to taste foods, detect airborne hazards in the environment, and carry out other functions dependent on the sense.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.04.2022
How can I pay for that? U-M researchers find technology solutions to health care costs
New developments in technology may provide tools to help patients and health care providers make cost-informed decisions and connect patients to additional resources if they cannot afford their prescribed medications, say University of Michigan researchers. A pair of new U-M studies uncovers the barriers that both patients and providers face in understanding the costs for prescription medications and medical tests.

Environment - Health - 12.04.2022
Women's exposure to pesticides could affect sleep patterns of female offspring
Women’s exposure to pesticides could affect sleep patterns of female offspring
A woman's exposure to pesticides during pregnancy could lead to differences in sleep duration and timing during adolescence for her female offspring, according to a new University of Michigan study. "While non-occupational pesticide exposure is widely known to occur through chemical products used to repel insects in the home, exposure can also occur through other routes, such as diet.

Pedagogy - Health - 11.04.2022
Trial reveals benefits of text message support on children’s bedtime routines
A proof-of-concept study of an intervention which sends support and information to parents at bedtime by text message has been shown to improve the quality of their children's sleep. Devised by researchers at The Universities of Manchester, the system - costing under £2 per family for a weekwas also shown to improve the overall quality of bedtime routines as well as parental mood.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.04.2022
New research targets faster diagnosis for Parkinson’s patients
MRI images of the brain can help researchers identify biomarkers that detect Parkinson's disease (Photo credit: Ali Khan) Five years ago, Alice Jones (not the patient's real name for privacy) noticed she was having trouble wiggling her toes and using her left shoulder for everyday tasks like washing her hair.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.04.2022
How Ovarian Cancer Defies Immunotherapy
UC San Diego researchers describe how key tumor proteins combine to suppress the immune response, making ovarian cancer among the toughest malignancies to treat; the findings may lead to new combinatorial strategies to treat this disease Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health, with collaborators at La Jolla Institute for Immunology and elsewhere, have further elucidated how ovarian cancer tumors defy immunotherapy, identifying new molecular targets that might boost immune response.

Agronomy / Food Science - Economics / Business - 11.04.2022
Study sheds new light on the origin of civilisation
The research sheds new light on the mechanisms by which the adoption of agriculture led to complex hierarchies and states It challenges the conventional -productivity theory- which holds that regional differences in land productivity explain regional disparities in the development of hierarchies and states, by theoretical arguments and empirical analysis.

Environment - 11.04.2022
How can invasive species be detected swiftly?
How can invasive species be detected swiftly?
"I would never have thought that this species would be so widespread," states Rosetta Blackman, a postdoctoral researcher at the aquatic research institute Eawag. She is referring to the peach blossom jellyfish (Craspedacusta sowerbii), a small freshwater jellyfish that is harmless to humans. It originates from the Yangtze River basin in China and is considered an invasive species in Switzerland.

Physics - Research Management - 11.04.2022
Photon-photon interactions in the Standard Model and beyond: New research unit at JGU granted DFG funding
Photon-photon interactions in the Standard Model and beyond: New research unit at JGU granted DFG funding
A pure quantum effect as the key to a better understanding of the subatomic world / New research program in Mainz bundles a wide range of expertise In classical physics, the superposition of light waves resulting in interference is a well-known phenomenon. An interaction of light rays in the sense of a scattering is, however, classically impossible.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.04.2022
Relieving symptoms in paraplegia
Up to 80% of people with a spinal cord injury suffer from spasticity. Until now, they had to choose between drugs with severe side effects or risky surgery. Mathematician and neuroscientist Ursula Hofstötter from the Medical University of Vienna developed a procedure that alleviates spasticity and also improves mobility - without any drugs or surgery.