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Results 61 - 80 of 3947.


Chemistry - Environment - 29.11.2022
To Battle Climate Change, Scientists Tap Into Carbon-Hungry Microorganisms for Clues
Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ÜBerkeley Lab) have demonstrated a new technique, modeled after a metabolic process found in some bacteria , for converting carbon dioxide (CO2) into liquid acetate, a key ingredient in "liquid sunlight" or solar fuels produced through artificial photosynthesis.

Economics / Business - 29.11.2022
Good leadership is like sex and chocolate ice cream
Good leadership is like sex and chocolate ice cream
Good leadership is like sex and chocolate ice cream: what goes on in the minds of motivated employees Who wouldn't want a boss like Barack Obama? A leader who carries the team along, communicates visions and inspires enthusiasm. But why are employees more motivated by such behavior? Scientists at the University of Graz know the answer: because good leadership activates the same areas of the brain as chocolate ice cream or sex, and can therefore have just as motivating an effect.

Pedagogy - 29.11.2022
Cognitive flexibility enhances mathematical reasoning
Cognitive flexibility enhances mathematical reasoning
A team from the University of Geneva shows that using different points of view on a problem helps improve students'proportional reasoning.

Health - Materials Science - 29.11.2022
A sensitive drill
A sensitive drill
Hearing-impaired people whose auditory nerve is still intact can often be helped with a cochlear implant. But inserting the implant into the inner ear is not without risks, as facial nerves can be damaged in the process. researchers have developed a novel smart drill that minimizes the risk by automatically shutting off when it comes near nerves.

Health - 29.11.2022
Do women age differently from men?
Do women age differently from men?
Studies in fruit flies reveal how the sex determines the responses to the anti-ageing drug rapamycin The effect of medicines on women and men can differ significantly. This also applies to the currently most promising anti-ageing drug rapamycin, as researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Cologne and University College London have now shown.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 29.11.2022
Small asteroids are probably young
Small asteroids are probably young
The impact experiment conducted on the asteroid Ryugu by the Japanese Hayabusa2 mission which took place two years ago resulted in an unexpectedly large crater. With the use of simulations, a team led by the University of Bern and the National Center of Competence in Research (NCCR) PlanetS has recently succeeded in gaining new insights from the experiment regarding the formation and development of asteroids.

Environment - Life Sciences - 29.11.2022
An ecological rule breaker shows the effects of climate change on body size evolution
An ecological rule breaker shows the effects of climate change on body size evolution
Does evolution follow certain rules? Can these rules be predicted? Southeast Asia's tree shrews break multiple rules when it comes to body size variation - with an unexpected twist - according to researchers from McGill University, University of Cambridge, and Yale University. The findings shed new light on the effects of climate change on the evolution of body size in animals.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 29.11.2022
Mapping the chemistry of the Earth's mantle
Mapping the chemistry of the Earth’s mantle
The Earth's mantle makes up about 85% of the Earth's volume and is made of solid rock. But what rock types is the mantle exactly made of, and how are they distributed throughout the mantle? An international team of researchers - including UT researcher Dr Juan Carlos Afonso (Faculty of ITC) - have been able to reveal the existence of pockets of rocks with abnormal properties that suggest that they were once created at the surface, transported to vast depths along subduction zones, and accumulated at specific depths inside the Earth's mantle.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.11.2022
Ancient viruses may hold key to effective gene therapy treatments
Scientists have unlocked key insights into virus evolution, revealing new information that could help develop treatments for a wide variety of genetic diseases. The research, which was led by scientists at the MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research (CVR) and University of Massachusetts Chan Medical School, focuses on a group of small, ubiquitous viruses called 'parvoviruses' (from the Latin word "parvus" meaning 'small', 'puny' or 'unimportant').

Environment - 29.11.2022
Pet ferret owners’ awareness of animal boredom can impact their pet’s welfare
New research from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) has revealed the extent to which pet ferret owners are aware of and understand ferret boredom. The study found that, although most owners believed their ferrets could experience boredom, owners who doubted this capability in ferrets provided a significantly less stimulating environment for their pets.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.11.2022
Secret to waking up alert and refreshed
Many people who find it hard to wake up in the morning blame it on their constitution or their genes. But how you slept, what you ate for breakfast and the amount of physical activity you engaged in the day before have a lot more to do with your ability to wake up alert. (Shutterstock image) Do you feel groggy until you've had your morning joe? Do you battle sleepiness throughout the workday? You're not alone.

Paleontology - Campus - 29.11.2022
A pair of lizard 'kings' from the old, old West
A pair of lizard ’kings’ from the old, old West
Yale research has identified the oldest-known, definitive members of an evolutionary group that includes all living lizards and their closest extinct relatives. Yale researchers have identified the oldest-known, definitive members of the lizard crown group that includes all living lizards and their closest extinct relatives.

Health - Mathematics - 28.11.2022
Using math to better treat cancer
Using math to better treat cancer
Waterloo researchers develop treatment scheduling method to target heterogeneous tumours Researchers at the University of Waterloo have identified a new method for scheduling radiation therapy that could be as much as 22 percent more effective at killing cancer cells than current standard radiation treatment regimens.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 28.11.2022
Deepest look yet into the heart of a quasar
Deepest look yet into the heart of a quasar
International team observes innermost structure of quasar 3C 273 At the core of almost every galaxy is a supermassive black hole. But there are many different types. Quasars, for example, are one of the brightest and most active types of galaxy centres. An international group, including researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, presents new observations of the first quasar ever identified.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 28.11.2022
Non-detection of key signal allows astronomers to determine what the first galaxies were - and weren't - like
Non-detection of key signal allows astronomers to determine what the first galaxies were - and weren’t - like
Researchers have been able to make some key determinations about the first galaxies to exist, in one of the first astrophysical studies of the period in the early Universe when the first stars and galaxies formed, known as the cosmic dawn.

Life Sciences - Environment - 28.11.2022
Live fast, avoid extinction: fast-lived species more resilient to human influences
Live fast, avoid extinction: fast-lived species more resilient to human influences
Animals that live fast - that is, frequent or abundant reproduction and short lifespans - are more resilient to human-driven land use changes than those with slow life-histories, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. Across the globe, in areas that have experienced rapid expansion of cropland or bare soil, fast-lived species have increased in numbers in recent decades while slow-lived species are in decline, according to the findings published in Global Change Biology .

Pedagogy - 28.11.2022
University students improve their comprehension if the questions are inserted in the text instead of at the end
University students improve their comprehension if the questions are inserted in the text instead of at the end
An investigation of the Interdisciplinary Research Structure (ERI) of Reading of the University of Valencia (UV) affirms that, for the learning of sciences in university students, it is more efficient to integrate the questions in the development of the text than to accumulate them at the end. Applying this method, as the researcher Alba Rubio did for this study published in the journal Instructional Science , has resulted in more focused and careful learning, and helps to better remember what has been learned.

Physics - Chemistry - 28.11.2022
How to fire projectiles through materials without breaking anything
How to fire projectiles through materials without breaking anything
When charged particles are being shot through ultra-thin layers of material, sometimes spectacular micro-explosions occur, sometimes the material remains almost intact. This has now been explained at the TU Wien. It sounds a bit like a magic trick: Some materials can be shot through with fast, electrically charged ions without exhibiting holes afterwards.

Environment - Life Sciences - 28.11.2022
Mussel survey reveals alarming degradation of River Thames ecosystem since the 1960s
Mussel survey reveals alarming degradation of River Thames ecosystem since the 1960s
Scientists replicated a 1964 River Thames survey and found that mussel numbers have declined by almost 95%, with one species - the depressed river mussel - completely gone. This dramatic decline in native mussel populations is very worrying, and we are not sure what's driving it David Aldridge The detailed study measured the change in size and number of all species of mussel in a stretch of the River Thames near Reading between 1964 and 2020.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 28.11.2022
Why we display belonging on Social Media
Why we display belonging on Social Media
Previous research on social media has mainly focused on how often people use it. Researchers from the University of Basel and the University of Koblenz-Landau have developed a new construct for measuring why people spend so much time on these platforms - and what content they post. November 2022 Are you the sort of person who likes to post photos on Instagram or Facebook and tag people in them? Do you frequently add things like "#bestfriends" or "BFFs"- If so, you probably have a high level of DTBP, or desire to belong publicly.