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Environment - Health - 18.05.2022
Smartphone addiction and the secrets of killer whale diets
Smartphone addiction and the secrets of killer whale diets
Environment Lower-income populations will be hardest hit by heat waves Unlocking the secrets of killer whale diets and their role in climate change Unlocking the secrets of killer whale diets and their role in climate change Killer whale populations are invading the Arctic, causing significant disruptions to an ecosystem already deeply affected by climate change.

Life Sciences - Innovation - 18.05.2022
New insights on link between genetic mutations and biological evolution
New insights on link between genetic mutations and biological evolution
From the longer-beaked Galapagos Island finches studied by biologist Charles Darwin - which enabled them to more effectively snatch insects - to the ability of some humans over others to digest milk, genetic differences that give organisms a competitive edge drive the process of natural selection. Now, research by  Alex N. Nguyen Ba , an assistant professor of biology at the University of Toronto Mississauga, adds an important dimension to our understanding of how genes interact in the evolutionary process.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.05.2022
Significant gains from computer-based depression treatment
Computer-based cognitive behavioral therapy was found to be significantly effective in treating depression in adults. (Andrea Piacquadio/Pexels) A new international collaborative study, involving multiple institutions including Western University, has found computer-based cognitive behavioural therapy (CCBT) has significantly greater impact in treating depression among adults than treatment as usual (TAU).

Paleontology - 18.05.2022
Unexpected differences between males and females in early mouse deer
Unexpected differences between males and females in early mouse deer
Mouse deer are among the smallest ruminants in the world. Today, they live in the tropics of Africa and Asia and are barely larger than hares. Males and females differ little in appearance. But that was not the case about eleven million years ago. Josephina Hartung and Professor Madelaine Böhme from the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment at the University of Tübingen came across a previously unknown difference between the sexes while examining two fossil mouse deer skulls from the Hammerschmiede clay pit in the Allgäu region of Germany.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.05.2022
Levelling up UK rare disease research
Levelling up UK rare disease research
The UK needs new approaches to developing treatments for rare diseases, according to a new report led by UCL researchers describing how universities, the pharmaceutical industry and the NHS could improve life sciences collaborations. The report authors are calling for an independent British Office for Rare Diseases, comparable to the Office of Rare Disease Research in the US.

Environment - Health - 18.05.2022
Erratic temperatures causing more deaths than heatwaves: study
A new study has attributed 1.75 million deaths per year to fluctuating temperatures. It is the first to quantify the number of deaths associated with unstable temperatures. It found temperature variability had similar impacts to air pollution on global mortality. Deaths as a result of temperature variability accounted for 3.4% of all deaths globally between 2000 and 2019.

Computer Science - 18.05.2022
Unglitching the system: Advancement in predicting software vulnerabilities
Unglitching the system: Advancement in predicting software vulnerabilities
New research from Monash University presents the most effective approach to accurately predict vulnerabilities in software code and strengthen cybersecurity. To help combat this, Faculty of Information Technology experts developed the 'LineVul' approach, and found it increased accuracy in predicting software vulnerabilities by more than 300 percent while spending only half the usual amount of time and effort, when compared to current best-in-class prediction tools.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.05.2022
Impact of sleep-disordered breathing in adults over 70
A recent study by Monash researchers found that even mild cases of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), the most common type being obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), associate with lower physical health-related quality of life, and also with lower cognitive function.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 18.05.2022
Kidney cells pump blood
Kidney cells pump blood
Study reveals that kidney cells don't filter blood, they pump it The finding could help detect and treat kidney diseases and aid in disease modeling Human kidneys are an intricate network of tubes that process roughly 190 quarts of blood every day. Lining these tubes are epithelial cells that transport blood through the kidneys and circulate it back into the body.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.05.2022
New research may explain unexpected effects of common painkillers
New research may explain unexpected effects of common painkillers
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen and aspirin are widely used to treat pain and inflammation. But even at similar doses, different NSAIDs can have unexpected and unexplained effects on many diseases, including heart disease and cancer. Now, a new Yale-led study has uncovered a previously unknown process by which some NSAIDs affect the body.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.05.2022
Phage Therapy: A Model to Predict Its Efficacy against Pathogenic Bacteria
Phage Therapy: A Model to Predict Its Efficacy against Pathogenic Bacteria
Antibiotic resistance represents a major public health challenge, associated with a high mortality rate. While bacteriophages - viruses that kill bacteria - could be a solution for fighting antibiotic-resistant pathogens, various obstacles stand in the way of their clinical development.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.05.2022
Treatment for commonest form of blindness moves a step closer
Treatment for commonest form of blindness moves a step closer
Scientists at The University of Manchester have taken an important step towards finding a treatment for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common form of adult blindness in the developed world. Publishing in the top journal PNAS and funded by the Macular Society, the researchers were able to identify early signs of the disease which could be targeted by new treatments before symptoms develop.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 17.05.2022
How faulty mRNA is detected and destroyed
Two similar proteins can stand in for each other in the quality control mechanism of defective mRNA. This has redefined the distribution of protein tasks / publication in 'The EMBO Journal'. Scientists led by Professor Dr Niels Gehring at the Institute for Genetics at the University of Cologne have investigated two similar proteins, UPF3A and UPF3B, which are involved in the quality control mechanism 'nonsense-mediated mRNA decay' (NMD).

Innovation - Environment - 17.05.2022
Toys and furniture from popcorn
Toys and furniture from popcorn
Forest scientists at Göttingen University develop environmentally friendly products from renewable raw materials Forest scientists at the University of Göttingen have long been researching sustainable and efficient processes to make products from popcorn granulate. There are many uses for these products: from packaging to insulating panels for building insulation .

History / Archeology - 17.05.2022
Spectacular ceiling paintings discovered in the temple of Esna
Spectacular ceiling paintings discovered in the temple of Esna
German and Egyptian researchers have uncovered a series of colourful ceiling paintings in the temple of Esna in Upper Egypt. As Professor Christian Leitz of the University of Tübingen reported, the relief-like images of the central ceiling section are a total of 46 depictions of the Upper Egyptian crown goddess Nechbet and the Lower Egyptian crown goddess Wadjet.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 17.05.2022
New findings on the global cooling of 1627 BC
New findings on the global cooling of 1627 BC
An interdisciplinary study, in which the University of Bern played a major role, sheds new light on two extreme volcanic events and a subsequent global cooling in antiquity. With the help of a highly precise analysis of volcanic ash and sulphur in ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica, it became clear that the global cooling around 1627 BC was not attributable to the Thera volcano in Santorini, as previously assumed, but to a volcano in distant Alaska.

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 17.05.2022
Previously Unknown Dolphin Species Was Present in Switzerland
Previously Unknown Dolphin Species Was Present in Switzerland
Twenty million years ago, the Swiss Plateau region, or -Mittelland-, was an ocean in which dolphins swam.

Health - Social Sciences - 17.05.2022
Researcher Koen Byttebier writes book on Covid-19 and capitalism
Successful and unsuccessful approaches to the pandemic by Western governments Tuesday, May 17, 2022 — Since 2020, the world has been experiencing the consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.05.2022
Different subtypes defined in small cell lung cancer
Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a malignant disease associated with a particularly high mortality rate. According to a new multicenter study led by MedUni Vienna and conducted in collaboration with researchers from the Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovenia, Sweden and the United States, SCLC can be divided into several subgroups in terms of clinical behaviour.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.05.2022
Change of temperature causes whole body reprogramming
Scientists have discovered that changes in temperature cause marked and organ-specific effects in all tissues. Human beings, like most organisms, are constantly exposed to alternating colder or warmer temperatures. These environmental variations cause striking metabolic effects and require constant adaptations.