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Life Sciences - 29.12.2022
New study on the circadian clock of the fruit fly
Regulating the sleep-wake cycle: researchers demonstrate the importance of transporting a "clock protein" from the cell nucleus for temperature compensation The higher the temperatures, the faster physiological processes are. But there is an exception - the so-called circadian clock, which regulates the sleep-wake cycle in organisms.

Health - Pharmacology - 29.12.2022
Immune signature discovered for Long Covid
Severe covid 19 disease is characterized by excessive immune and inflammatory processes in the body. Conversely, long covid syndrome is likely to have a strong anti-inflammatory immune status. Scientists have now found this out with extensive blood plasma analyses of vaccinated persons without subsequent disease, persons with completely survived covid 19 infection and long covid patients.

Environment - Chemistry - 29.12.2022
Old Christmas trees could be saved from landfill to make renewable fuels
Seven million Christmas trees end up in landfill in the UK each year, releasing an estimated 100,000 tonnes of harmful greenhouse gases into the atmosphere New research has found a more efficient, simplified process for using pine needles to produce formic acid, for use in hydrogen fuel cells, as a food preservative and in agricultural and industrial manufacturing Pine needles collected after Christmas and processed in this way could be used to

Environment - 28.12.2022
Skiing over the Christmas holidays no longer guaranteed - even with snow guns
Skiing over the Christmas holidays no longer guaranteed - even with snow guns
For many people in Switzerland, holidays in the snow are as much a part of the end of the year as Christmas trees and fireworks. As global warming progresses, however, white slopes are becoming increasingly rare. Researchers at the University of Basel have calculated how well one of Switzerland's largest ski resorts will remain snow reliable with technical snowmaking by the year 2100, and how much water this snow will consume.

Psychology - 26.12.2022
Females perform better than males on a 'theory of mind' test across 57 countries
Females perform better than males on a ’theory of mind’ test across 57 countries
Females, on average, are better than males at putting themselves in others- shoes and imagining what the other person is thinking or feeling, suggests a new study of over 300,000 people in 57 countries. Our results provide some of the first evidence that the well-known phenomenon - that females are on average more empathic than males - is present in wide range of countries across the globe David Greenberg Researchers found that females, on averag

Environment - Earth Sciences - 26.12.2022
Slime for the climate, delivered by brown algae
Slime for the climate, delivered by brown algae
Brown algae could remove up to 0.55 gigatons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere every year Brown algae take up large amounts of carbon dioxide from the air and release parts of the carbon contained therein back into the environment in mucous form. This mucus is hard to break down for other ocean inhabitants, thus the carbon is removed from the atmosphere for a long time, as researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen now show.

Physics - Electroengineering - 26.12.2022
Optomechanics simulates graphene lattices
Optomechanics simulates graphene lattices
Scientists at EPFL have overcome the scaling challenges of quantum optomechanical systems and realized the first superconducting circuit optomechanical graphene lattice. The precise control of micro-mechanical oscillators is fundamental to many contemporary technologies, from sensing and timing to radiofrequency filters in smartphones.

History / Archeology - 23.12.2022
Humans have been using bear skins for at least 300,000 years
Humans have been using bear skins for at least 300,000 years
Humans have been using bear skins to protect themselves from cold weather for at least 300,000 years. This is suggested by cut marks on the metatarsal and phalanx of a cave bear discovered at the Lower Paleolithic site of Schöningen in Lower Saxony, Germany. This makes it one of the oldest examples of this type in the world.

Health - 23.12.2022
People sleep the least from early 30s to early 50s
People sleep less in mid-adulthood than they do in early and late adulthood, finds a new study led by UCL, University of East Anglia and University of Lyon researchers. Sleep duration declines in early adulthood until age 33, and then picks up again at age 53, according to the findings published in Nature Communications .

Pharmacology - Health - 23.12.2022
COVID-19 treatments have long-term benefits for patients
Drugs used to treat critically ill COVID-19 patients in hospital have long-term benefits, according to new research. The study, published in JAMA , found that treating critically ill patients with the drugs tocilizumab and sarilumab reduced the risk of dying over six months by a quarter, compared to those who did not receive these treatments.

Health - Psychology - 23.12.2022
COVID-19 pandemic increased the vulnerability of people living with obesity
COVID-19 pandemic increased the vulnerability of people living with obesity
The COVID-19 pandemic may have left people living with obesity more vulnerable to the cost-of-living crisis, warns a study led by UCL researchers. Adults with obesity surveyed in the study reported that their mental health - which is known to be associated with weight gain - had deteriorated between the end of the UK's first COVID-19 lockdown in July 2020 and September 2021.

Health - 23.12.2022
Role of titin in muscle contraction demonstrated
On the trail of the body's largest protein: WWU researchers prove the role of titin in muscle contraction Münster (mfm/mew) - The term "titin" will not mean much to most people - which is actually a pity. Because titin is the largest protein in the body. With its approximately 35,000 amino acids, the muscle protein is huge, but its significance is still poorly understood.

Life Sciences - 23.12.2022
How to turn a tentacle into a foot
How to turn a tentacle into a foot
By identifying a key regulator of cell identity, a team from the University of Geneva and the FMI has succeeded in modifying the structure and function of tentacle cells in hydra. Humans, animals, plants: all multicellular organisms are made up of specialized cells called differentiated cells. Thus, the cells that make up the epidermis do not have the same identity - nor the same function - as those that line the digestive system, for example.

Paleontology - Health - 22.12.2022
A tumor more than 215 million years old
A tumor more than 215 million years old
International research team describes bone cancer in a large amphibian species from southwestern Poland More than 215 million years ago, a large amphibian species lived in floodplains in southwestern Poland: Metoposaurus krasiejowensis. On one of these fossils, Polish and American scientists, with the participation of researchers from the University of Bonn, detected bone cancer for the first time.

Environment - Transport - 22.12.2022
Is it safe? Why some animals fear using wildlife crossings
Is it safe? Why some animals fear using wildlife crossings
UCLA-led research on deer and elk could point the way toward crossing structures that are more effective for all species UCLA-led research on deer and elk could point the way toward crossing structures that are more effective for all species In recent years, humans have built wildlife crossings in high-traffic areas to prevent road accidents and give animals access to expanded habitats for mating and resources.

Physics - 22.12.2022
Journal editors, reviewers don’t show bias against novelty
Scientific journals are likely to accept papers that provide new findings compared with studies reporting conventional results, which is contrary to long-standing concerns about publication biases. Using peer-reviewed data from 49 journals in the life and physical sciences, a new University of Michigan study found that evaluators are not biased against novelty, as scholars have suggested for decades.

History / Archeology - Agronomy / Food Science - 22.12.2022
The Neolithic populations that came to the peninsula by sea and lived near it barely consumed fish
The Neolithic populations that came to the peninsula by sea and lived near it barely consumed fish
Domingo Carlos Salazar, CIDEGENT researcher at the University of Valencia (UV), has led a study that dates the occupation of the Neolithic site of Cova Bonica, located near the coast and the Llobregat River Delta. The results, published in the Frontiers magazine, confirm the important weight of an agricultural-livestock economy 7,400 years ago now, with a diet based on domesticated species of cereals and animals, and without the presence of fish.

Career - 22.12.2022
Migrant workers dare not make a case when labor law problems arise
Labor migrants especially in the lowest income groups have more frequent labor disputes than the Dutch working population, but do not dare to file formal cases about them for fear of being fired. Those are the main conclusions in the recently published report "De aanpak van arbeidsrechtelijke problemen onder arbeidsmigranten," which Tilburg researchers Anna Sobczyk-Turek and Jan Cremers collaborated on for the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.12.2022
Trial to explore the use of psychedelics for alcohol use disorder
Trial to explore the use of psychedelics for alcohol use disorder
Researchers at the University of Sydney are embarking on an Australian first research trial into the use of psychedelics in combination with psychotherapy for the treatment of alcohol use disorder. The trial builds on a growing body of innovative research on psychedelic medications for substance use disorders supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council, Medical Research Future Fund and pharmaceutical industry partners.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.12.2022
Cellular reprogramming can generate neural networks that reproduce unique characteristics of human cells
Cellular reprogramming can generate neural networks that reproduce unique characteristics of human cells
Studies on diseases that affect the human brain are usually based on animal models which cannot reproduce the complexity of human neuropathies. Therefore, these methodologies often fail when applied in a clinical environment with patients. In this context, the findings of the cellular reprogramming techniques to generate cultures of human neurons using skin cells have revolutionised the study and development of innovative therapies in neurosciences.
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