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Results 101 - 120 of 4282.


Health - Pharmacology - 19.12.2022
Global study presents first results on the longer-term effects of therapies for the treatment of critically ill patients with COVID-19
Global study presents first results on the longer-term effects of therapies for the treatment of critically ill patients with COVID-19
Published today in The Journal of the American Medical Association ( JAMA ), the study is part of the ongoing Randomized Embedded Multifactorial Adaptive Platform for Community Acquired Pneumonia (REMAP-CAP) trial and was led by Monash University's Dr Lisa Higgins from the School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine.

Health - 19.12.2022
Researchers identify ’born to be bad’ colorectal cancer tumours
An international research team has identified 'born to be bad' colorectal tumours in people with early stage cancer, which could help medical experts pinpoint and better treat aggressive tumours. The team from Monash University , CRUK Beatson Institute in Glasgow and Queens University in Belfast found a feature of early-stage colorectal tumours in mice and humans, known as TGF? signalling, that is active in tumour cells and is profoundly tumour-promoting.

Environment - Innovation - 18.12.2022
UrbanTwin: seeing double for sustainability
A consortium of Swiss research institutes has begun working on UrbanTwin to make an AI driven, ecologically sensitive model of the energy, water and waste systems the town of Aigle to help boost sustainability. Twins are a fascinating phenomenon: observing how identical twins, even those separated at birth, can resemble each other in appearance, character, ability, and personal taste is astounding.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 17.12.2022
Climate change threatens Lake Tanganyika in East Africa
Research from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel and UC Louvain warns of the effects of global warming on the fragile ecosystems of one of Africa's largest lakes. A rise of a few degrees in the water temperature can unbalance the ecosystem, with a major impact on local habitats as a result. "For our research, we combined a 3D hydrodynamic model of Lake Tanganyika made using SLIM-3D by Professor Eric Deleersnijder's research group at UC Louvain, with our own VUB expertise on climate modelling," says lead author Kevin Sterckx of VUB's Department of Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.12.2022
UCLA-developed soft brain probe could be a boon for depression research
The probe is flexible enough to monitor the brains of research subjects as they move and perform everyday activities. The ability to continuously measure neurotransmitters would improve our understanding of how these chemicals affect psychological states. Anyone familiar with antidepressants like Prozac or Wellbutrin knows that these drugs boost levels of neurotransmitters in the brain like serotonin and dopamine, which are known to play an important role in mood and behavior.

Chemistry - Computer Science - 16.12.2022
Using quantum-inspired computing, University of Toronto Engineering and Fujitsu discover improved catalyst for clean hydrogen
Using quantum-inspired computing, University of Toronto Engineering and Fujitsu discover improved catalyst for clean hydrogen
Researchers from the University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering and  Fujitsu  have developed a new way of searching through 'chemical space' for materials with desirable properties. The technique has resulted in a promising new catalyst material that could help lower the cost of producing clean hydrogen.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 16.12.2022
Calculate the land-use impact of your diet
Agriculture is one of the leading causes of human induced land-use change globally. Our food consumption and production, especially in industrialised countries, is thereby damaging the planet.

Music - Computer Science - 16.12.2022
'Ediphon': Editing pop music scientifically with the help of an app
’Ediphon’: Editing pop music scientifically with the help of an app
Research Award Winner at the University of Paderborn Presents Results In classical music, editions are considered the basis of scholarly study of music. Unlike classical music, however, pop music is not composed on music paper, but in audio data. The substance of pop music is its sound. Rebecca Grotjahn, professor at the Department of Musicology at the University of Paderborn and the Detmold University of Music, is investigating how this can be edited as so-called -phonographic- music.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 16.12.2022
UK needs to use phosphorus sustainably
Phosphorus use in the UK needs to be better managed and used in a much more sustainable way to reduce river pollution and increase resilience over rising fertiliser prices, say researchers. Despite phosphorus being a key nutrient in the agricultural sector for which there is no alternative, the food and feedstock industries rely on imports from a small number of countries including China, Russia and Morocco.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 16.12.2022
Starvation Causes Cell Remodeling
New study on "starvation response" by Freie Universität professor of pharmacology published in Science / Joint press release with the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie Body cells burn off fat reserves when nutrient supply from food ceases. A team led by Professor Volker Haucke and Dr. Wonyul Jang from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) has now discovered a previously unknown mechanism for how this "starvation response" is triggered and what can inhibit it.

Innovation - Computer Science - 16.12.2022
MIOIR Researchers launch new report on the Adoption of Digital Technologies and Skills in Greater Manchester
MIOIR Researchers launch new report on the Adoption of Digital Technologies and Skills in Greater Manchester
Silvia Massini, Mabel Sanchez-Barrioluengo, Xiaoxiao Yu have published a report exploring the key findings from ADiTS survey, in collaboration with the Greater Manchester Chamber of Commerce. High costs and a lack of access to people with the relevant skills are significant barriers to businesses adopting digital technologies across Greater Manchester, according to a major new AMBS report.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.12.2022
The parasite that is the most frequent cause of a type of meningitis, found for the first time in rats from continental Europe
A research conducted by the Parasites and Health group of the University of Valencia has found for the first time in continental Europe the nematode worm) Angiostrongylus cantonensis , a zoonotic (capable of being transmitted to humans) parasite present in the pulmonary arteries of rats and that it is the most common causative agent in humans of eosinophilic meningitis (EM).

Environment - Transport - 16.12.2022
World's first net zero transatlantic flight to fly from London in 2023
World’s first net zero transatlantic flight to fly from London in 2023
Researchers will work with Virgin Atlantic to launch the world's first transatlantic flight powered solely by sustainable aviation fuel. The passenger flight from London to New York will be fuelled by 100 per cent sustainable aviation fuel (SAF), combined with carbon removal through biochar credits - a material that traps and stores carbon taken from the atmosphere - making the flight net zero.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 16.12.2022
From molecules to organisms
From molecules to organisms
How did life on Earth first emerge? And how was it able to prosper and evolve? researchers are involved in the quest to find answers to these fundamental questions. Since time immemorial, humanity has pondered the question of how life on Earth first began. Ancient cultures declared the creation of the world and the origin of life to be the work of gods and other divine beings.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 16.12.2022
When hungry, the cell remodels
When hungry, the cell remodels
Body cells burn fat reserves when the supply of nutrients from food is interrupted. A team led by Volker Haucke of Freie Universität Berlin and the Leibniz Research Institute for Molecular Pharmacology (FMP) and Wonyul Jang of the FMP has now discovered a previously unknown mechanism for how this "starvation metabolism" gets going - and what can inhibit it.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.12.2022
A ’muscular’ response to regeneration
Therapies to target neuromuscular disorders affecting million of people worldwide are on the horizon thanks to research at the Montreal Clinical Research Institute of Montreal. CONTENU - Neuromuscular disorders affect millions of people worldwide. Now a discovery made at the Montreal Clinical Research Institute of Montreal (IRCM) opens the door to the development of targeted therapies.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.12.2022
Medical cannabis treating at least 2.7 percent of population
Medical cannabis treating at least 2.7 percent of population
An estimated 600,000 Australians are using medical cannabis - but that's according to data from 2019. Considering the dramatic increase in the number of doctors registering to prescribe in the past two years, and the rapid growth of applications for prescriptions, the figure today is likely to be much higher.

Social Sciences - Health - 16.12.2022
New figures provide latest data on veterans suicide
Serving in the military for longer periods of time, and serving on operational tours were associated with reduced suicide risk; while younger veterans and those who left after a short career were more at risk A new study from The University of Manchester has found that veterans are at no greater risk of suicide than the general population.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.12.2022
The most common type 2 diabetes drug needs the action of a cellular-stress-response protein to make effect
The most common type 2 diabetes drug needs the action of a cellular-stress-response protein to make effect
Metformin, the most prescribed drug for treating diabetes mellitus, known as type 2 diabetes, requires the presence of the growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) —a protein whose expression increases in response to cellular stress— to present its antidiabetic effects.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 15.12.2022
Tracing the Surface Dynamics of Star Dunes with Laser Scanning
Tracing the Surface Dynamics of Star Dunes with Laser Scanning
Heidelberg geographers use new methods to capture large dune shapes in time and space and to explain their origin Star dunes are among the largest dune formations on Earth and - due to their changing shape over time - they can be important indicators for understanding the effects of climate change. Scientists from Heidelberg University's Institute of Geography have examined such a dune in the Erg Chebbi sandy desert in Morocco by means of state-of-the-art laser scanning.