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Campus - 11.07.2022
Fighting online child exploitation —researchers identify effective ’attack’ strategies
Researchers are advancing efforts to derail online child exploitation by determining which proactive attack strategies are the most effective. In a new preprint paper, Simon Fraser University researcher Richard Frank and Golestan University researcher Fateme Movahedi found greater efficacy in combating online exploitation using a digital attack strategy known as -principal component analysis,- or PCA.

Environment - Campus - 27.06.2022
Researchers study plants sprouting from century-old seeds uncovered during Toronto Port Lands excavation
Researchers study plants sprouting from century-old seeds uncovered during Toronto Port Lands excavation
At a Toronto Port Lands construction site on the city's waterfront, keen-eyed workers recently spotted plants that had sprouted from soil recently exposed by the removal of tonnes of earth. The plants were hard stem bulrush and cattails, which are commonly found in freshwater marshes. Because the plants grew from a patch of ground that had been seven metres below the surface for a century, conservationists concluded that they had grown from seeds buried when Ashbridges Bay Marsh at the mouth of the Don River was covered with landfill in the early 1900s.

Career - Campus - 20.06.2022
Research explores tactics women leaders employ to overcome gender stereotypes, toll such actions take
In corporate boardrooms, women often face backlash or negative career consequences when they are unable to display both warmth and competence-gendered societal expectations commonly referred to as the "double bind. Study: Managing the Double Bind: Women Directors' Participation Tactics in the Gendered Boardroom Morela Hernandez , professor at the University of Michigan Ford School of Public Policy and faculty director of the school's Leadership Initiative, investigates the disadvantages that women leaders face, which ultimately hinders progress toward gender equality.

Campus - Computer Science - 10.05.2022
Engineering students dig through snowplow data to gauge Toronto’s response to winter storms
Last January, as 55 centimetres of snow blanketed Toronto over a period of just 15 hours, the city's snow-clearing fleet appeared to struggle to keep up. But was it actually different than other storms, or did it just seem that way? For three students in the University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering who were taking "Data Science for Engineers," a graduate-level course taught by  Sebastian Goodfellow , an assistant professor in the department of civil and mineral engineering, it was the perfect case study to test out their new number-crunching skills.

Mathematics - Campus - 04.05.2022
Algorithm predicts which students will drop out of Math courses
In the subjects of science and technology, engineering and mathematics - known collectively as STEM subjects - up to 40 percent of students drop out of their studies in the entry phase. A research team from the University of Tübingen's Methods Center at the Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences has now developed a statistical method that can be used to predict on average eight weeks in advance whether students will terminate their studies.

Campus - Health - 28.04.2022
Engineers at UBC get under the skin of ionic skin
Science, Health & Technology Lou Corpuz-Bosshart  In the quest to build smart skin that mimics the sensing capabilities of natural skin, ionic skins have shown significant advantages. They're made of flexible, biocompatible hydrogels that use ions to carry an electrical charge. In contrast to smart skins made of plastics and metals, the hydrogels have the softness of natural skin.

Life Sciences - Campus - 27.04.2022
Blind people remember language better than sighted people do
Blind people remember language better than sighted people do
Researchers theorize that the area responsible for vision in sighted people may enhance recall or language processing abilities in people who are blind Blind people can remember speech better than sighted people, but a person's ability to see makes no difference in how they remember sound effects, found a new study by Johns Hopkins University and the University of California, Irvine.

Campus - 25.04.2022
Anyone can be a cyberbully, not just people who are unhinged
People who have high premeditated or impulsive aggressive tendencies online are likely to cyberbully others, according to a new University of Michigan study. But anyone can be an online offender-not just certain groups of people, the study indicated. Researchers from the School of Information and the Law School examined what psychological characteristics predicted how internet users behaved in aggressive online conflict.

Health - Campus - 19.04.2022
Wearables can track COVID symptoms, other diseases
If you become ill with COVID-19, your smartwatch can track the progression of your symptoms, and could even show how sick you become. That's according to a University of Michigan study that examined the effects of COVID-19 with six factors derived from heart rate data. The same method could be used to detect other diseases such as influenza, and the researchers say the approach could be used to track disease at home or when medical resources are scarce, such as during a pandemic or in developing countries.

Campus - 30.03.2022
Exoskeletons with personalize-your-own settings
Exoskeletons with personalize-your-own settings
Users who could adjust the timing, torque of an ankle exoskeleton typically found comfortable settings in under two minutes To transform human mobility, exoskeletons need to interact seamlessly with their user, providing the right level of assistance at the right time to cooperate with our muscles as we move.

Astronomy / Space Science - Campus - 29.03.2022
Source of super-fast electron rain
Source of super-fast electron rain
The downpours, which can affect satellites and space travel, are caused by electromagnetic whistler waves, scientists say The downpours, which can affect satellites and space travel, are caused by electromagnetic whistler waves, scientists say UCLA scientists have discovered a new energetic electrons raining down on Earth , a phenomenon that contributes to the colorful aurora borealis but also poses hazards to satellites, spacecraft and astronauts.

Campus - Social Sciences - 21.03.2022
Increasing harassment of researchers subject of new report
Increasing harassment of researchers subject of new report
A Canadian task force made up of university-based researchers, including at Western, is tackling the growing number of online threats and harassments researchers face and has called on the federal government to initiate a nationwide, coordinated approach to addressing the issue. "The problem has always been there, but the tools have changed," said Howard Ramos, chair of the department of sociology, and co-author of a Royal Society of Canada briefing, " Protecting Expert Advice for the Public: Promoting Safety and Improved Communications.

Astronomy / Space Science - Campus - 10.03.2022
New, improved Dragonfly telescope is a galactic gas detector
New, improved Dragonfly telescope is a galactic gas detector
The Dragonfly telescope is undergoing a metamorphosis. For the past decade, the Dragonfly Telephoto Array - designed by Yale's Pieter van Dokkum and the University of Toronto's Roberto Abraham and located in New Mexico - has conducted groundbreaking science by detecting faint starlight within dimly lit parts of the night sky.

Astronomy / Space Science - Campus - 10.03.2022
The new, improved Dragonfly is a galactic gas detector
The new, improved Dragonfly is a galactic gas detector
The Dragonfly telescope is undergoing a metamorphosis. For the past decade, the Dragonfly Telephoto Array - designed by Yale's Pieter van Dokkum and the University of Toronto's Roberto Abraham and located in New Mexico - has conducted groundbreaking science by detecting faint starlight within dimly lit parts of the night sky.

Campus - Economics / Business - 02.03.2022
Cause for Optimism
Pilot program explores possibilities of low-cost, online support to address COVID-19 learning disruptions A recent pilot program measuring the results of online tutoring for K-12 students has shown positive, promising results, according to a new study from the University of California San Diego's Rady School of Management.

Environment - Campus - 21.02.2022
Government Guidelines Across North America, Europe Fail to Protect Lakes from Salt Pollution
UC San Diego ecologists contribute to a coordinated international scientific experiment The salinity of freshwater ecosystems caused by road de-icing salts, agriculture fertilizers, mining operations and climate change is increasing worldwide and current water quality guidelines don't do enough to address the issue, an international study co-authored by University of California San Diego scientists and led by The University of Toledo and Queen's University in Kingston has found.

Campus - Linguistics / Literature - 14.02.2022
Virgil has the edge on Shakespeare in helping students to love literature
Virgil has the edge on Shakespeare in helping students to love literature
Students who study Virgil's Aeneid at school find it significantly more engaging than other 'high-prestige' literature, even though they only learn tiny fragments of the text, research suggests. Ultimately, if this is high-level poetry that students actually like, perhaps we ought to be finding ways to give them the chance to do it Frances Foster The finding comes from a limited study with three groups of 15 and 16-year-old state school students taking Latin GCSE, and raises the possibility that there may be a case for expanding ancient literature's use in the wider curriculum.

Psychology - Campus - 13.02.2022
Understanding how your romantic partner sees your emotions may help couples cope with conflict
Beliefs about how we are seen by our romantic partners may affect the quality of our relationships, McGill Psychology study finds A study by researchers at McGill University is shedding new light on the importance of the perception of emotion in romantic relationships. The all-McGill team found that, regardless of how an individual is truly feeling, knowing their partner sees their emotions as a typical reaction to a given situation may lead to better relations within a couple - especially in situations of conflict.

Life Sciences - Campus - 28.01.2022
A Map for the Sense of Smell
Evolution has structured flies with an energy-efficient olfactory system The distinctive smell of a flower... the unmistakable aroma of coffee... the dangers linked with inhaling smoke fumes. Sensory systems have evolved to provide us with immediate, finely tuned information about the world around us, whether they are color processed through our visual system or certain pitches interpreted through our hearing.

Campus - 26.01.2022
Blockchain as proof of identity
Community Land Trust Brussels wins World Habitat Award VUB experts study and guide global development of community land trusts for affordable housing Wednesday, January 26, 2022 VUB in the media A se