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Chemistry - Physics - 18.08.2022
Simple method destroys dangerous 'forever chemicals,' making water safe
Simple method destroys dangerous ’forever chemicals,’ making water safe
World's water tainted. Synthetic PFAS, which have been linked to cancer and other diseases, have contaminated nearly every drop of water on the planet. Unbreakable bond. These chemicals contain a carbon-fluorine bond that is almost impossible to break, making it extremely difficult to eradicate them from water supplies.

Health - Chemistry - 18.08.2022
Common ingredient in household products could be contributing to antibiotic resistance: University of Toronto researchers
Common ingredient in household products could be contributing to antibiotic resistance: University of Toronto researchers
A recent study by researchers at the University of Toronto has identified a chemical found in several consumer products that could be a potential cause of the rise of antibiotic resistance In Canada. The study, by Assistant Professor  Hui Peng 's research group in the department of chemistry in the Faculty of Arts & Science, was able to show that triclosan - a chemical often included in household items like hand soaps, toothpastes, and cleaning products to fight off bacteria - is the predominant antibiotic in Ontario sewage sludge.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 17.08.2022
Mini caps for mini brains
Mini caps for mini brains
Engineering feat expands the research and testing available to scientists with brain organoids It could be the world's tiniest EEG electrode cap, created to measure activity in a brain model the size of a pen dot. Its designers expect the device to lead to better understanding of neural disorders and how potentially dangerous chemicals affect the brain.

Chemistry - Physics - 12.08.2022
Important milestone on the way to transition metal catalysis with aluminum
Important milestone on the way to transition metal catalysis with aluminum
Chemists successfully synthesize a cationic, low-valent aluminum complex salt via metathesis The chemists Philipp Dabringhaus , Julie Willrett and Ingo Krossing from the Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry at the University of Freiburg have succeeded in synthesizing the low-valent cationic aluminum complex [Al(AlCp*) 3 ] + by a metathesis reaction.

Chemistry - Physics - 10.08.2022
Chemists develop new reagent for deelectronation
Chemists develop new reagent for deelectronation
The reagent provides access to the class of clustered transition metal carbonyl cations Chemists from Freiburg have succeeded in converting polynuclear transition metal carbonyls into their homoleptic complex cations using typical inorganic oxidants. In their work, the research team of Malte Sellin , Christian Friedmann and Ingo Krossing from the Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry and Maximilian Mayländer and Sabine Richert from the Institute of Physical Chemistry at the University of Freiburg show that the anthracene derivative with a half-step potential of 1.

Health - Chemistry - 10.08.2022
University of Toronto chemist aims to improve diagnosis of disease one protein molecule at a time
University of Toronto chemist aims to improve diagnosis of disease one protein molecule at a time
Scientists understand that proteins cause various diseases, from Alzheimer's to cystic fibrosis to Parkinson's to cataracts. But detecting them before they trigger illness is still a work in progress. For University of Toronto analytical chemist  Alana Ogata , the answer is to find better ways to identify single protein molecules in our bodily fluids, such as blood, urine, saliva and sweat.

Physics - Chemistry - 09.08.2022
In control of chaos
In control of chaos
Crystals consisting of wildly mixed ingredients - so-called high-entropy materials - are currently attracting growing scientific interest. Their advantage is that they are particularly stable at extremely high temperatures and could be used, for example, for energy storage and chemical production processes.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 09.08.2022
Astrophysicist helps map the origins of the universe
No bigger than a microwave oven, a device designed and built by a University of Miami astrophysicist is helping an international team of astronomers obtain a colossal amount of data on how the universe's so-called dark ages came to an end roughly 400 million years after the Big Bang. Josh Gundersen's 125-pound cryostat, which he partially fabricated at the University's Coral Gables Campus, cools the receiver array of a high-tech radio telescope to 15 degrees above absolute zero, ensuring that the dish will be able to pick up light emitted by galaxies billions of years ago.

Chemistry - 08.08.2022
Understanding how rechargeable aqueous zinc batteries work
Understanding how rechargeable aqueous zinc batteries work
While scientists have hoped that rechargeable zinc-manganese dioxide batteries could be developed into a viable alternative for grid storage applications, engineers at the University of Illinois Chicago and their colleagues identified the reasons these zinc-based fuel systems fail. The scientists reached this conclusion after leveraging advanced electron microscopy, electrochemical experiments and theoretical calculations to look closer at how the zinc anode works with the manganese cathode in the battery system.

Environment - Chemistry - 04.08.2022
A simple, cheap material for carbon capture, perhaps from tailpipes
Carbon dioxide (depicted in red and white at left) is the main greenhouse gas warming Earth and is emitted in large quantities in the flue gas from industrial and power plants. A new method for removing CO2 from these flue gases involves piping the emissions through a porous material based on the chemical melamine (center).

Physics - Chemistry - 02.08.2022
New approach for building quantum computers
New approach for building quantum computers
Stronger, faster. Quantum computers promise far greater speed and processing power than today's most powerful supercomputers. The quantum quandary. Because these next-generation computers rely on the fragile interaction of atomic and subatomic particles, scaling up their processing power has proved a challenge.

Chemistry - History / Archeology - 01.08.2022
Researchers study historical developments of the periodic system of chemical elements
Researchers study historical developments of the periodic system of chemical elements
In the 1860s, the chemists, Lothar Meyer and Dmitri Mendeleev, independently presented the first periodic system. Since then, the well-known tabular arrangement of the elements has been the guiding principle of chemistry. A team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences and the Interdisciplinary Center for Bioinformatics at the University of Leipzig provides computational approaches based on extensive data sets from the Reaxys chemistry database that explain the development of the first periodic systems.

Physics - Chemistry - 28.07.2022
A nanokelvin microwave freezer for molecules
A nanokelvin microwave freezer for molecules
A new method to cool gases of polar molecules to near absolute zero paves the way for studying quantum effects of exotic forms of matter Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics have developed a novel cooling technique for molecular gases. It makes it possible to cool polar molecules down to a few nanokelvin.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 28.07.2022
A paper battery with water switch
A paper battery with water switch
A team of researchers at Empa developed a water-activated disposable paper battery. The researchers suggest that it could be used to power a wide range of low-power, single-use disposable electronics - such as smart labels for tracking objects, environmental sensors and medical diagnostic devices - and minimize their environmental impact.

Physics - Chemistry - 27.07.2022
Graphene scientists capture first images of atoms 'swimming' in liquid
Graphene scientists capture first images of atoms ’swimming’ in liquid
Graphene scientists from The University of Manchester have created a novel 'nano-petri dish' using two-dimensional (2D) materials to create a new method of observing how atoms move in liquid. Publishing in the journal, Nature , the team led by researchers based at the National Graphene Institute (NGI) used stacks of 2D materials including graphene to trap liquid in order to further understand how the presence of liquid changes the behaviour of the solid.

Chemistry - 27.07.2022
Native New Zealand tree puts the sting on pain
Native New Zealand tree puts the sting on pain
Researchers at The University of Queensland have found that a native New Zealand stinging tree produces toxins that could hold clues for future pain medication. In a quest to find new molecules that affect pain pathways, Dr Thomas Durek , Dr Sam Robinson and a team from UQ's Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB) studied toxins from the tree nettle known as ongaonga, one of New Zealand's most poisonous plants that can cause painful stings that last for days, and in severe cases can even be fatal.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 27.07.2022
A Molecular Machine At Work
A Molecular Machine At Work
Researchers unravel the assembly of an enzyme that detoxifies the greenhouse gas N2O The greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) is produced as a by-product of industrial processes and through the use of fertilizers in agriculture. It makes a steadily growing contribution to climate change and ozone depletion.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 27.07.2022
Greener, more efficient method for producing next-generation antibiotics
Scientists develop greener, more efficient method for producing next-generation antibiotics An international team of researchers has developed a method for altering one class of antibiotics, using microscopic organisms that produce these compounds naturally. Study: Chemoenzymatic synthesis of fluorinated polyketides (DOI: 10.1038/s41557'022 -00996-z) The findings, published July 25 in Nature Chemistry, could lead to more efficient production of antibiotics that are effective against drug-resistant bacteria.

Chemistry - Physics - 26.07.2022
How Do Nanoparticles Grow? Atomic-Scale Movie Upends 100-Year-Old Theory
How Do Nanoparticles Grow? Atomic-Scale Movie Upends 100-Year-Old Theory
Berkeley Lab scientists observe nanoparticles ripening in solution at record-breaking resolution For decades, a textbook process known as "Ostwald ripening," named for the Nobel Prize-winning chemist Wilhelm Ostwald, has guided the design of new materials including nanoparticles - tiny materials so small they are invisible to the naked eye.

Environment - Chemistry - 22.07.2022
Porous Crystals Bind Fluorine-containing Greenhouse Gases
Porous Crystals Bind Fluorine-containing Greenhouse Gases
HEIDELBERG RESEARCHERS DEVELOP NEW CRYSTALLINE MATERIALS THAT ADSORB POLYFLUORINATED HYDROCARBONS ON THEIR SURFACE Emissions of greenhouse gases contribute significantly to global warming. Not only carbon dioxide (CO2) but also fluorine-containing gases - including so-called per- or polyfluorinated hydrocarbons, or PFCs - have a significant share in this development.
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