news 2022

« BACK

Chemistry



Results 101 - 120 of 161.


Life Sciences - Chemistry - 30.03.2022
New research aims to unlock painkilling secrets of deadly snail venom
New research aims to unlock painkilling secrets of deadly snail venom
The deadly venom of a poisonous sea snail could hold the key to developing new medicines including more effective, less addictive forms of pain relief. A team led by researchers from the University of Glasgow is setting out to learn more about the unique form of venom produced by cone snails, predatory marine animals found in warm seas and oceans throughout the word.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 30.03.2022
Scavenger nanoparticles could make fuel cell-powered vehicles a reality
Scavenger nanoparticles could make fuel cell-powered vehicles a reality
Engineers at the University of Illinois Chicago are among a collaborative team that has developed a material that could give fuel cell systems a competitive edge over the battery systems that currently power most electric vehicles. In contrast to lithium batteries, fuel cell technology relies on catalyst-driven chemical reactions to create energy.

Health - Chemistry - 28.03.2022
New method of developing diagnostic tests could help tackle future pandemics
Software which helps speed up the process of creating new diagnostic tests could help combat future pandemics, its developers say. A team of bioengineers and chemists in Scotland and China have developed a system which suggests new reaction pathways to accelerate the design and development of new diagnostic assays.

Health - Chemistry - 28.03.2022
Using organ-on-a-chip platform, researchers devise potential strategy to treat severe COVID-19 complications
Using organ-on-a-chip platform, researchers devise potential strategy to treat severe COVID-19 complications
Using their novel organ-on-a-chip platform, a research team from the University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering has identified a molecule with the potential to combat one of the most severe complications of COVID-19 infections. The molecule, a novel anti-inflammatory peptide called QHREDGS, does not act on the virus directly.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 24.03.2022
MEET Team presents Toolbox for Analysis of End-of-Life-Batteries
MEET Team presents Toolbox for Analysis of End-of-Life-Batteries
Compared to laboratory cells or aged but still intact commercial cells, shredded battery materials represent an even more complex sample. Active materials of both electrodes, inactive materials and electrolyte residues cannot be easily analysed separately.

Chemistry - 22.03.2022
Catalytic hydrogen generation - without expensive precious metals
Catalytic hydrogen generation - without expensive precious metals
A research team from Friedrich Schiller University Jena has developed a molecular photosystem inspired by nature that generates hydrogen under visible light irradiation. In contrast to other existing systems of this type, it functions without the use of precious or heavy metals.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.03.2022
Chemists discover new reactivity of strained molecules
Chemists discover new reactivity of strained molecules
In synthetic organic chemistry, so-called cycloadditions are a particularly important class of reactions. With this type of reaction, ring-shaped molecules can be constructed simply and efficiently by joining ("adding") two compounds that each contain double bonds. A team led by Frank Glorius from the University of Münster has now succeeded in performing an unconventional cycloaddition in which a carbon-carbon double bond reacts with a carbon-carbon single bond.

Health - Chemistry - 21.03.2022
'holy grail' method to identify the ageing mosquitos which cause malaria
’holy grail’ method to identify the ageing mosquitos which cause malaria
Scientists develop 'holy grail' method to identify the ageing mosquitos which cause malaria Scientists at the University of Glasgow and partner institutes have developed an inexpensive, fast and simple way to identify the ageing mosquitos which transmit the deadly malaria parasite.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.03.2022
Twisted vibrations enable quality control for chiral drugs and supplements
Twisted vibrations enable quality control for chiral drugs and supplements
Terahertz light creates twisting vibrations in biomolecules such as proteins, confirming whether their compositions and structures are safe and effective. It's not easy to be sure that drugs and supplements with twisted-or chiral-structures are turning in the correct direction. Now, twirling infrared light can probe both the structures of molecular crystals and their twists, research led by the University of Michigan has shown.

Chemistry - Computer Science - 17.03.2022
With machine learning to new supramolecular materials
With machine learning to new supramolecular materials
New supramolecular materials can be used in energy production and medical devices. The team of the TUM Innovation Network ARTEMIS aims to identify the best supramolecular materials for use with the help of machine learning. A team of scientists at the TUM Innovation Network ARTEMIS (Artificial Intelligence Powered Multifunctional Material Design), named after the Greek goddess of hunting, are researching supramolecular materials.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 17.03.2022
What regulates the 'glue' needed for nerve repair?
What regulates the ’glue’ needed for nerve repair?
Researchers at The University of Queensland have identified a molecule essential for regulating the repair of injured nerves, which could help people recover from nerve damage. The finding was made using the nematode worm C. elegans which has long been studied by researchers for its ability to self-repair nerve cells.

Physics - Chemistry - 16.03.2022
Complex pathways influence time delay in ionization of molecules
Complex pathways influence time delay in ionization of molecules
Study shows how the mechanism of photoionization can be used to gain insights into complex molecular potentials How can researchers use the mechanism of photoionization to gain insight into complex molecular potential? This question has now been answered by a team led by Giuseppe Sansone from the Institute of Physics at the University of Freiburg.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 14.03.2022
Researchers ID Sex Pheromone of Invasive Giant Hornet
Chemicals used as bait to trap and track so-called -murder hornets- as they expand their footprint in the Western United States The world's largest hornet has been the focus of extensive news coverage of late due to its menacing appearance and expanding footprint in North America. But while the "murder hornet" label attached to the Asian giant hornet ( Vespa mandarinia ) may be an overdramatization of its danger, researchers agree that the invasive species is destructive and threatens North American bee populations and millions of dollars in crop production.

Physics - Chemistry - 11.03.2022
Using ions to find molecules
Using ions to find molecules
IoP and QuSoft physicists use a single trapped ion to detect ultracold molecules When we think of ions, we usually think of single atoms that have lost or gained some electrons, but entire molecules can also become ions. In a new publication that was highlighted as an Editor's Suggestion in Physical Review Letters this week, physicists from the University of Amsterdam, QuSoft and Stony Brook University, show that cold molecular ions can be created using a new method, and that they are a very useful tool for detecting small amounts of other, regular molecules.

Chemistry - 11.03.2022
UQ lab to detect and measure tiny plastic particles in the human body
In one of the world's first plastics contamination-controlled laboratories, University of Queensland researchers have begun testing blood and tissue samples to develop ways to detect and measure nanoplastics in the human body. A partnership between UQ and Minderoo Foundation , the Minderoo Centre - Plastics and Human Health will enable world-leading research using this unique lab, state-of-the-art equipment and specific techniques to measure nanoplastics in samples.

Health - Chemistry - 10.03.2022
Gentler tumor treatment
Gentler tumor treatment
Radiation therapy is one of the cornerstones of cancer therapy. However, some types of tumor respond little or hardly at all to radiation. If it were possible to make tumor cells more sensitive, treatment would be more effective and gentler. Empa and researchers have now succeeded in using metal oxide nanoparticles as "radiosensitizers" - and in producing them on an industrial scale.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 09.03.2022
Universal Mechanism of Methane Formation Discovered
Universal Mechanism of Methane Formation Discovered
Scientists from Heidelberg and Marburg prove that the greenhouse gas is formed chemically in the cells of all organisms The formation of the greenhouse gas methane is based on a universal mechanism. Scientists at Heidelberg University and the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology in Marburg have made this discovery.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 08.03.2022
Mushroom genus Cortinarius follows its own metabolic pathway
Mushroom genus Cortinarius follows its own metabolic pathway
What proves to be advantageous will be preserved in the long term. Put in very simple terms, this is the principle of evolution whereby organisms adapt to an environment in the best possible way. These adaptation processes often result in similar or the same traits in different groups of organisms, if their environment requires it.

Environment - Chemistry - 07.03.2022
Tiny 'skyscrapers' help bacteria convert sunlight into electricity
Tiny ’skyscrapers’ help bacteria convert sunlight into electricity
Researchers have made tiny 'skyscrapers' for communities of bacteria, helping them to generate electricity from just sunlight and water. Our approach is a step towards making even more sustainable renewable energy devices for the future Jenny Zhang The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, used 3D printing to create grids of high-rise 'nano-housing' where sun-loving bacteria can grow quickly.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 06.03.2022
Shaping up the Genome for Cell Division
Shaping up the Genome for Cell Division
Researchers from Heidelberg and Würzburg have uncovered the inner workings of the molecular machinery that shapes chromosomes during cell division. Our cells perform a marvel of engineering when it comes to packing information into small spaces. Every time a cell divides, it bundles up an amazing 4 metres of DNA into 46 tiny packages, each of which is only several millionths of a metre in length.