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Results 161 - 180 of 197.


Chemistry - Life Sciences - 28.02.2022
New, nature-inspired concepts for turning CO2 into clean fuels
New, nature-inspired concepts for turning CO2 into clean fuels
Researchers have developed an efficient concept to turn carbon dioxide into clean, sustainable fuels, without any unwanted by-products or waste. Instead of capturing and storing CO2, which is incredibly energy-intensive, we have demonstrated a new concept to capture carbon and make something useful from it in an energy-efficient way Erwin Reisner The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, have previously shown that biological catalysts, or enzymes, can produce fuels cleanly using renewable energy sources, but at low efficiency.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 25.02.2022
Cosmic web orchestrates the progression of galaxies
Cosmic web orchestrates the progression of galaxies
The shape of galaxies and how they evolve depend on a web of cosmological filaments that run across the Universe. According to a recent study headed by EPFL's Laboratory of Astrophysics, this cosmic web plays a much bigger role than previously thought. Across the Universe, galaxies are distributed along what's called the cosmic web, a complex network of filaments made up of ordinary and dark matter.

Chemistry - 16.02.2022
Scientists report breakthrough in transuranium actinide chemical bonding
Scientists report breakthrough in transuranium actinide chemical bonding
Scientists from The University of Manchester have managed to successfully make a transuranium complex where the central metal, here neptunium, forms a multiple bond to just one other element. Enabling study of such a bonding interaction in isolation for the first time is a key breakthrough for nuclear waste clean-up.

Environment - Chemistry - 15.02.2022
Investigating the 'skunk' smell and other emissions caused by cannabis production
Investigating the ’skunk’ smell and other emissions caused by cannabis production
Q&As Alex Walls What exactly causes that 'skunky' odour emitted by cannabis production facilities, and what do these emissions mean for air quality, workers, and the general public? We should address these and other knowledge gaps while the industry is still developing, according to a new study led by Davi de Ferreyro Monticelli, a doctoral candidate in UBC's department of earth, ocean and atmospheric sciences.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 14.02.2022
DisCo: boosting the efficiency of single-cell RNA sequencing
DisCo: boosting the efficiency of single-cell RNA sequencing
Bioengineers at EPFL have found a way to radically increase the efficiency of single-cell RNA-sequencing, a powerful tool that can -read- the genetic profile of an individual cell. Single-cell RNA sequencing, or -scRNA-seq- for short, is a technique that allows scientists to study the expression of genes in an individual cell within a mixed population - which is virtually how all cells exist in the body's tissues.

Chemistry - Physics - 10.02.2022
How life came to Earth
How life came to Earth
Researchers from the Friedrich Schiller University Jena and the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy have discovered a new clue in the search for the origin of life by showing that peptides can form on dust under conditions such as those prevailing in outer space. These molecules, which are one of the basic building blocks of all life, may therefore not have originated on our planet at all, but possibly in cosmic molecular clouds.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 10.02.2022
Protection from the Molecular Shredder
Heidelberg plant researchers discover cellular mechanism that extends the life of proteins Plants are tied to one location and need to adjust to their environment, including adverse conditions. Adaptive responses include synthesising new proteins and breaking down those that are no longer needed. For this task, plants use a considerable amount of energy.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 09.02.2022
A new electrolyte for greener and safer batteries
A new electrolyte for greener and safer batteries
A team from the University of Geneva has developed a new material that improves the performance of solid-state sodium batteries, a less dangerous and more durable alternative to lithium. The future of battery technologies lies in sodium. More sustainable than lithium - which currently powers most of our devices and vehicles - sodium is also abundant on the earth's surface.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 08.02.2022
How easy is it to create oxygen from water on Mars?
How easy is it to create oxygen from water on Mars?
Scientists at The University of Manchester and The University of Glasgow have today provided more insight into the possibility of establishing a pathway to generate oxygen for humans to potentially call the Moon or Mars 'home' for extended periods of time. Creating a reliable source of oxygen could help humanity establish liveable habitats off-Earth in an era where space travel is more achievable than ever before.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 08.02.2022
Microgravity experiments could help future space missions source oxygen
New research on generating oxygen from water found on the surfaces of other planets could help support future long-term missions to the Moon and Mars. Researchers from the University of Glasgow and colleagues took a series of gruelling flights into microgravity to study how the different gravitational pull of other planets could affect the process of electrolysis.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 07.02.2022
Sweating the small stuff: Smartwatch developed at UCLA measures key stress hormone
Sweating the small stuff: Smartwatch developed at UCLA measures key stress hormone
The human body responds to stress, from the everyday to the extreme, by producing a hormone called cortisol. To date, it has been impractical to measure cortisol as a way to potentially identify conditions such as depression and post-traumatic stress, in which levels of the hormone are elevated. Cortisol levels traditionally have been evaluated through blood samples by professional labs, and while those measurements can be useful for diagnosing certain diseases, they fail to capture changes in cortisol levels over time.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 07.02.2022
Columns Designed from Nanographenes
Columns Designed from Nanographenes
Several layers of nanographenes stacked on top of each other: such functional elements could one day be used in solar cells. Würzburg chemists have paved the way for this. Graphene is a carbon material that forms extremely thin layers. Because of its unusual properties, it is interesting for many technical applications.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 04.02.2022
With a Little Help, New Optical Material Assembles Itself
With a Little Help, New Optical Material Assembles Itself
Breakthrough could enable large-scale manufacturing of nanomaterials for industry A research team led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ÜBerkeley Lab) has demonstrated tiny concentric nanocircles that self-assemble into an optical material with precision and efficiency. Their work overcomes a longstanding problem in nanoscience - molecular impurities.

Health - Chemistry - 04.02.2022
Researchers Tackle COVID-19 with AI
A pair of papers coauthored by Anima Anandkumar, Caltech's Bren Professor of Computing and Mathematical Sciences, were selected as finalists for the 2021 Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Gordon Bell Special Prize for High Performance Computing-Based COVID-19 Research. The annual award provides $10,000 from Gordon Bell, a pioneer in high-performance and parallel computing.

Chemistry - Innovation - 02.02.2022
Novel Chemical Glucose Sensing Method based on Boronic acids and Graphene Foam
Novel Chemical Glucose Sensing Method based on Boronic acids and Graphene Foam
Researchers from Chemistry working with Integrated Graphene have developed a new glucose sensor that is cheaper and more robust than current systems. Researchers at the University of Bath working in collaboration with industrial partner, Integrated Graphene, have developed a new sensing technique based on graphene foam for the detection of glucose levels in the blood.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 28.01.2022
Artificial Muscles Made of Proteins
A Freiburg research team has developed the first material made of natural proteins that contracts autonomously Dr. Stefan Schiller and Dr. Matthias Huber from the University of Freiburg's liv MatS Cluster of Excellence have succeeded in developing a muscle solely on the basis of natural proteins.

Chemistry - Environment - 26.01.2022
Getting hydrogen out of banana peels
Getting hydrogen out of banana peels
Scientists at EPFL have developed a way to maximize hydrogen yields from biowaste, within few milliseconds. The method uses rapid photo-pyrolysis to produce hydrogen gas and solid conductive carbon from banana peels. As the world's energy demands increase, so does our consumption of fossil fuels. The result is a massive rise in greenhouse gases emissions with severely adverse environmental effects.

Environment - Chemistry - 25.01.2022
Novel research identifies fresh 'mixers' in river pollution 'cocktail'
Novel research identifies fresh ’mixers’ in river pollution ’cocktail’
Water quality in rivers is affected by underpinning 'natural' hydrogeological and biogeochemical processes, as well as interactions between people and their environment that are accelerating stress on water resources at unprecedented rates. Pollutants can move at different speeds and accumulate in varying quantities along rivers where the mix of the complex 'cocktail' of chemicals that is making its way towards the ocean is constantly changing, a new study reveals.

Environment - Chemistry - 25.01.2022
Novel research identifies fresh 'mixers' in river pollution 'cocktail'
Novel research identifies fresh ’mixers’ in river pollution ’cocktail’
Water quality in rivers is affected by underpinning 'natural' hydrogeological and biogeochemical processes, as well as interactions between people and their environment that are accelerating stress on water resources at unprecedented rates. Pollutants can move at different speeds and accumulate in varying quantities along rivers where the mix of the complex 'cocktail' of chemicals that is making its way towards the ocean is constantly changing, a new study reveals.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 25.01.2022
Hungry yeast are tiny, living thermometers
Membranes are crucial to our cells. Every cell in your body is enclosed by one. And each of those cells contains specialized compartments, or organelles, which are also enclosed by membranes. Membranes help cells carry out tasks like breaking down food for energy, building and dismantling proteins, keeping track of environmental conditions, sending signals and deciding when to divide.