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Results 81 - 100 of 123.


Environment - Chemistry - 07.03.2022
Tiny 'skyscrapers' help bacteria convert sunlight into electricity
Tiny ’skyscrapers’ help bacteria convert sunlight into electricity
Researchers have made tiny 'skyscrapers' for communities of bacteria, helping them to generate electricity from just sunlight and water. Our approach is a step towards making even more sustainable renewable energy devices for the future Jenny Zhang The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, used 3D printing to create grids of high-rise 'nano-housing' where sun-loving bacteria can grow quickly.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 06.03.2022
Shaping up the Genome for Cell Division
Shaping up the Genome for Cell Division
Researchers from Heidelberg and Würzburg have uncovered the inner workings of the molecular machinery that shapes chromosomes during cell division. Our cells perform a marvel of engineering when it comes to packing information into small spaces. Every time a cell divides, it bundles up an amazing 4 metres of DNA into 46 tiny packages, each of which is only several millionths of a metre in length.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 03.03.2022
New method to produce chemically modified mRNA developed
In a recent study, the research group at the University of Cologne's Institute of Organic Chemistry led by Professor Dr Stephanie Kath-Schorr describes a novel method for the enzymatic production of synthetic messenger RNA (mRNA). While natural base modifications of mRNA are already being used - for example by BioNTech/Pfizer for the production of their coronavirus vaccine - this newly developed mRNA additionally contains site-specifically introduced, non-natural nucleotides.

Health - Chemistry - 03.03.2022
Bull ant evolves new way to target pain
Australian bull ants have evolved a venom molecule perfectly tuned to target one of their predators - the echidna - that also could have implications for people with long-term pain, University of Queensland researchers say. Dr Sam Robinson and David Eagles from UQ's Institute for Molecular Bioscience found a bull ant venom component that exploits a pain pathway in mammals, which they believe evolved to stop echidnas attacking the ant's nests.

Chemistry - Physics - 02.03.2022
Record-breaking and readily available - researchers discover aluminium complex with very strong fluorescence
Record-breaking and readily available - researchers discover aluminium complex with very strong fluorescence
Researchers at Friedrich Schiller University Jena find fluorescence dye with quantum yield close to 100 per cent Flavio Portwich (left) and Jun. Robert Kretschmer with a flurosescent polymer fleece. Image: Jürgen Scheere (University of Jena) Chemists at the University of Jena have set a new record, having discovered a fluorescent aluminium complex with the highest quantum yield known to date.

Environment - Chemistry - 01.03.2022
Scientists map Arctic aerosols to better understand regional warming
Scientists map Arctic aerosols to better understand regional warming
Scientists at EPFL and the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) have studied the chemical composition and origin - whether natural or anthropogenic - of aerosols in a region spanning from Russia to Canada. Their findings provide unique insights for helping researchers better understand climate change in the Arctic and design effective pollution-mitigation measures.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 28.02.2022
New, nature-inspired concepts for turning CO2 into clean fuels
New, nature-inspired concepts for turning CO2 into clean fuels
Researchers have developed an efficient concept to turn carbon dioxide into clean, sustainable fuels, without any unwanted by-products or waste. Instead of capturing and storing CO2, which is incredibly energy-intensive, we have demonstrated a new concept to capture carbon and make something useful from it in an energy-efficient way Erwin Reisner The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, have previously shown that biological catalysts, or enzymes, can produce fuels cleanly using renewable energy sources, but at low efficiency.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 25.02.2022
Cosmic web orchestrates the progression of galaxies
Cosmic web orchestrates the progression of galaxies
The shape of galaxies and how they evolve depend on a web of cosmological filaments that run across the Universe. According to a recent study headed by EPFL's Laboratory of Astrophysics, this cosmic web plays a much bigger role than previously thought. Across the Universe, galaxies are distributed along what's called the cosmic web, a complex network of filaments made up of ordinary and dark matter.

Chemistry - 16.02.2022
Scientists report breakthrough in transuranium actinide chemical bonding
Scientists report breakthrough in transuranium actinide chemical bonding
Scientists from The University of Manchester have managed to successfully make a transuranium complex where the central metal, here neptunium, forms a multiple bond to just one other element. Enabling study of such a bonding interaction in isolation for the first time is a key breakthrough for nuclear waste clean-up.

Environment - Chemistry - 15.02.2022
Investigating the 'skunk' smell and other emissions caused by cannabis production
Investigating the ’skunk’ smell and other emissions caused by cannabis production
Q&As Alex Walls What exactly causes that 'skunky' odour emitted by cannabis production facilities, and what do these emissions mean for air quality, workers, and the general public? We should address these and other knowledge gaps while the industry is still developing, according to a new study led by Davi de Ferreyro Monticelli, a doctoral candidate in UBC's department of earth, ocean and atmospheric sciences.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 14.02.2022
DisCo: boosting the efficiency of single-cell RNA sequencing
DisCo: boosting the efficiency of single-cell RNA sequencing
Bioengineers at EPFL have found a way to radically increase the efficiency of single-cell RNA-sequencing, a powerful tool that can -read- the genetic profile of an individual cell. Single-cell RNA sequencing, or -scRNA-seq- for short, is a technique that allows scientists to study the expression of genes in an individual cell within a mixed population - which is virtually how all cells exist in the body's tissues.

Chemistry - Physics - 10.02.2022
How life came to Earth
How life came to Earth
Researchers from the Friedrich Schiller University Jena and the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy have discovered a new clue in the search for the origin of life by showing that peptides can form on dust under conditions such as those prevailing in outer space. These molecules, which are one of the basic building blocks of all life, may therefore not have originated on our planet at all, but possibly in cosmic molecular clouds.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 10.02.2022
Protection from the Molecular Shredder
Heidelberg plant researchers discover cellular mechanism that extends the life of proteins Plants are tied to one location and need to adjust to their environment, including adverse conditions. Adaptive responses include synthesising new proteins and breaking down those that are no longer needed. For this task, plants use a considerable amount of energy.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 09.02.2022
A new electrolyte for greener and safer batteries
A new electrolyte for greener and safer batteries
A team from the University of Geneva has developed a new material that improves the performance of solid-state sodium batteries, a less dangerous and more durable alternative to lithium. The future of battery technologies lies in sodium. More sustainable than lithium - which currently powers most of our devices and vehicles - sodium is also abundant on the earth's surface.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 08.02.2022
How easy is it to create oxygen from water on Mars?
How easy is it to create oxygen from water on Mars?
Scientists at The University of Manchester and The University of Glasgow have today provided more insight into the possibility of establishing a pathway to generate oxygen for humans to potentially call the Moon or Mars 'home' for extended periods of time. Creating a reliable source of oxygen could help humanity establish liveable habitats off-Earth in an era where space travel is more achievable than ever before.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 08.02.2022
Microgravity experiments could help future space missions source oxygen
New research on generating oxygen from water found on the surfaces of other planets could help support future long-term missions to the Moon and Mars. Researchers from the University of Glasgow and colleagues took a series of gruelling flights into microgravity to study how the different gravitational pull of other planets could affect the process of electrolysis.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 07.02.2022
Sweating the small stuff: Smartwatch developed at UCLA measures key stress hormone
Sweating the small stuff: Smartwatch developed at UCLA measures key stress hormone
The human body responds to stress, from the everyday to the extreme, by producing a hormone called cortisol. To date, it has been impractical to measure cortisol as a way to potentially identify conditions such as depression and post-traumatic stress, in which levels of the hormone are elevated. Cortisol levels traditionally have been evaluated through blood samples by professional labs, and while those measurements can be useful for diagnosing certain diseases, they fail to capture changes in cortisol levels over time.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 07.02.2022
Columns Designed from Nanographenes
Columns Designed from Nanographenes
Several layers of nanographenes stacked on top of each other: such functional elements could one day be used in solar cells. Würzburg chemists have paved the way for this. Graphene is a carbon material that forms extremely thin layers. Because of its unusual properties, it is interesting for many technical applications.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 04.02.2022
With a Little Help, New Optical Material Assembles Itself
With a Little Help, New Optical Material Assembles Itself
Breakthrough could enable large-scale manufacturing of nanomaterials for industry A research team led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ÜBerkeley Lab) has demonstrated tiny concentric nanocircles that self-assemble into an optical material with precision and efficiency. Their work overcomes a longstanding problem in nanoscience - molecular impurities.

Health - Chemistry - 04.02.2022
Researchers Tackle COVID-19 with AI
A pair of papers coauthored by Anima Anandkumar, Caltech's Bren Professor of Computing and Mathematical Sciences, were selected as finalists for the 2021 Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Gordon Bell Special Prize for High Performance Computing-Based COVID-19 Research. The annual award provides $10,000 from Gordon Bell, a pioneer in high-performance and parallel computing.