news 2022

« BACK

Environment



Results 121 - 140 of 772.
« Previous 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... 39 Next »


Environment - Life Sciences - 11.11.2022
New approach to assess the health status of intermittent rivers
New approach to assess the health status of intermittent rivers
More than 50% of the world's river network is made of temporary or intermittent rivers: those which, during a certain time of the year, mainly summer, present dry riverbeds or some isolated ponds. These rivers show high variability, both spatially and temporally, which makes it impossible for the same tools used to gauge the state of health of permanent rivers to be applied to them.

Life Sciences - Environment - 11.11.2022
The water flow rate of a fish’s ’home’ affects the survival of their offspring
The water flow where adult fish live can affect the body shape and survival of their offspring, according to new research. The study - led by an international collaboration between CRIOBE and the University of Glasgow, and published today in Functional Ecology - found that the survival of fish born from parents living under high water flow was reduced by half compared to fish born from those living under low water flow.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 10.11.2022
A river runs beneath it: new study discovers a 460-km river under the Antarctica ice sheet
A river runs beneath it: new study discovers a 460-km river under the Antarctica ice sheet
The discovery of a 460 km river under the Antarctica ice sheet could be the missing link to climate models. A team of researchers led by Dr. Christine Dow, a professor in the department of Geography and Environmental Management and cross-appointed to the Department of Applied Mathematics, discovered the river from a series of airborne radar surveys and modelling.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.11.2022
Biologist Joeri Zwerts experiences the impact of his biodiversity research at global FSC meeting
Biologist Joeri Zwerts experiences the impact of his biodiversity research at global FSC meeting
By presenting his research findings at a major international meeting, Joeri Zwerts experienced how he makes societal impact as a scientist. Last month, Zwerts spoke at the general assembly of global forest certification organization the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC). At this meeting, he presented his research about the effect of FSC conservation measures on wild mammal populations in Gabon and Congo.

Environment - 09.11.2022
What causes cod stock collapse: climate-induced environmental change or fishing?
What causes cod stock collapse: climate-induced environmental change or fishing?
For the first time, a digital model has shown that both fishing and climate-induced environmental change are responsible for the collapse of cod stocks in the North Sea. Taking into consideration these two factors together is crucial for the sustainable management of fish stocks. Using a new digital model, an international team led by researchers from the oceanology and geosciences laboratory (LOG) (CNRS/Université de Lille/Université du Littoral Côte d'Opale) has shown how fishing and climate affect cod stocks in the North Sea.

Environment - 09.11.2022
Earth-sun distance dramatically alters seasons in equatorial Pacific
A temperature map of the Pacific Ocean for December 1993 showing a cold (blue) tongue of surface water stretching westward along the equator from the coast of South America. The temperature and extent of the cold tongue changes with the seasons, but new climate simulations show that the annual change in Earth's distance from the sun also affects the cold tongue seasonal cycle.

Chemistry - Environment - 08.11.2022
100% efficient electrochemical conversion of carbon dioxide
Researchers from the University of Twente, in collaboration with Shell, developed a new mechanism that makes the conversion of carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide, which is an essential feedstock in the production of chemicals. Within this project under the umbrella of the Advanced Research Center Chemical Building Blocks Consortium (ARC CBBC), the researchers published their findings in the scientific journal ACS Energy Letters.

Health - Environment - 08.11.2022
Low levels of air pollution deadlier than previously thought
Low levels of air pollution deadlier than previously thought
The World Health Organization's most recent estimates (2016) are that over 4.2 million people die prematurely each year due to long-term exposure to fine particulate outdoor air pollution (often referred to as PM 2. A recent study involving McGill researchers now suggests that the annual global death toll from outdoor PM 2.5 may be significantly higher than previously thought.

Environment - Innovation - 08.11.2022
New research collaboration aims to tackle global societal challenges through design
Hasso Plattner Institute-MIT Research Program on Designing for Sustainability will focus on sustainable design, innovation, and digital technologies. At a signing ceremony last week, leaders from the MIT School of Architecture and Planning, the MIT Morningside Academy for Design (MAD) and the Hasso Plattner Institute (HPI) announced the Hasso Plattner Institute-MIT Research Program on Designing for Sustainability.

Environment - Life Sciences - 07.11.2022
Insects are strongly affected by climate change
Insects are strongly affected by climate change
In a study, 70 researchers from 19 countries around the world call for measures to better understand and reduce the impact of climate change on insects. Otherwise, they say, the chance of a sustainable future with healthy ecosystems will be drastically reduced. The researchers also outline ways to help insects in a warming world.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 07.11.2022
Working with mountain communities could help water systems adapt to climate
Working with mountain communities could help water systems adapt to climate
Imperial scientists have shared how working directly with mountain communities could drive adaptation to the loss of their main water sources. Nearly two billion people globally rely on mountain water for drinking and irrigation, but this water source is under threat due to global heating. Mountainous regions are particularly impacted by the effects of the climate crisis , with melting glaciers and snow adding to water scarcity in regions such as the Himalayas, Central Asia, and Andes.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 07.11.2022
Microplastic pollution threats the world's coastal lagoons
Microplastic pollution threats the world’s coastal lagoons
Globally, the coastal lagoons of Lagos (Nigeria), Sakumo (Ghana) and Bizerte (Tunisia) —close to large urban centres and without waste and sewage treatment systems— are among the most affected water ecosystems of this nature by microplastic pollution. However, the highest concentrations of microplastics have been detected in Barnes Sound and other small lagoons in a protected area in the north of Florida Bay (USA), a particular case that can be explained by the transport of microplastics carried by hurricanes from polluted areas.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 07.11.2022
Green and blue food webs are wired differently
Green and blue food webs are wired differently
Terrestrial and aquatic food webs respond differently to changes in the environment. Understanding these differences is fundamental to identifying the species most important to an ecosystem and to effectively protecting biodiversity. This is shown by a study led by the research institutes Eawag and WSL and published in the journal Nature Communications .

Environment - Earth Sciences - 07.11.2022
Rethinking mountain water security
Water security in mountain regions relies on an understanding of the interlinks of water supply and demand that goes far beyond the study of glacier melt. Current information on how the communities which depend on water from mountain snow and ice will be affected by climate change is limited, according to new research published in Nature Sustainability.

Environment - Astronomy / Space - 07.11.2022
Satellites Help Scientists Track Dramatic Wetlands Loss in Louisiana
Satellites Help Scientists Track Dramatic Wetlands Loss in Louisiana
New research uses NASA satellite observations and advanced computing to chronicle wetlands lost (and found) around the globe. From Lake Pontchartrain to the Texas border, Louisiana has lost enough wetlands since the mid-1950s to cover the entire state of Rhode Island. Using a first-of-its kind model, researchers quantified those wetlands losses at nearly 21 square miles (54 square kilometers) per year since the early 1980s.

Health - Environment - 07.11.2022
Taking steps towards emissions reduction in healthcare
Taking steps towards emissions reduction in healthcare
Monash University experts, along with an international group of researchers, have highlighted the need to accurately identify the carbon footprint of digital health interventions to help move towards more environmentally sustainable healthcare. Published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association , the new research reviewed 3299 studies and found that across the world there are no standard tools or methods of measuring the carbon footprint of digital health interventions.

Environment - Innovation - 04.11.2022
Making salt water fresh on Lampedusa
Since last week, a large-scale demo installation in Lampedusa is producing drinking water, salts and chemicals from seawater in an environmentally friendly way. Project leader Dimitris Xevgenos: "This is the first time that we're producing these marketable products at pre-commercial scale in Europe together with the right actors, including the use of waste heat.

Environment - Materials Science - 03.11.2022
Shining new light on solar cell development
Shining new light on solar cell development
An increase in the efficiency of solar panels may be on the horizon, as research from The Australian National University (ANU) reduces their current limitations. ANU researchers have found a way to improve the performance of silicon photovoltaic (PV) or solar cells.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 03.11.2022
Early snowmelt and northward jet stream setting Siberia ablaze
Early snowmelt and northward jet stream setting Siberia ablaze
Earth and climate scientists from Vrije Universiteit (VU) Amsterdam united forces to disentangle the combined effects of diminishing snow cover and a changing jet stream on recent Siberian fire extremes. The study was published today in the scientific journal Science. With a total of about 200,000 km2 of forest and tundra burned - equaling nearly five times the size of the Netherlands - the years 2019, 2020 and 2021 were the largest fire years in northern Siberian larch forests since 2001.

Environment - 03.11.2022
Drought across Africa
Drought across Africa
Vast swathes of Africa have experienced more frequent and intense episodes of drought since 1983, new research has uncovered. Research commissioned by WaterAid saw Cardiff University expert Professor Michael Singer join forces with colleagues from the University of Bristol to shine a new light on trends in East Africa, Southern Africa and Central Africa.
« Previous 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... 39 Next »