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Life Sciences - Environment - 13.06.2022
Mastodon tusk chemical analysis reveals first evidence of one extinct animal’s annual migration
Around 13,200 years ago, a roving male mastodon died in a bloody mating-season battle with a rival in what today is northeast Indiana, nearly 100 miles from his home territory, according to the first study to document the annual migration of an individual animal from an extinct species.

Health - Environment - 13.06.2022
Forever chemicals linked to hypertension in middle-aged women
Middle-aged women with higher blood concentrations of a common group of synthetic chemicals known as PFAS are at greater risk of developing high blood pressure, compared to their peers who have lower levels of these substances, say University of Michigan researchers. Called "forever chemicals,” PFAS (perand polyfluoroalkyl substances) are used in everyday household items, such as shampoo, dental floss, cosmetics, nonstick cookware, food packaging, stain-resistant coatings for carpeting, upholstery and clothing.

Environment - Life Sciences - 10.06.2022
Ningaloo corals are ill-equipped to handle future climate change
The relatively pristine coral populations of WA's inshore Kimberley region are better equipped to survive ocean warming than the World Heritage-listed Ningaloo Marine Park, according to a new Curtin University study. Despite previous research predicting coral species would move south to cooler waters to protect themselves, the new study - published in Molecular Ecology - has found this may not hold true on the West Coast of Australia.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 10.06.2022
Paname 2022: campaigns to study air quality and urban climate
Paname 2022: campaigns to study air quality and urban climate
The 2022 Paname initiative 1 aims to better understand the causes and effects of climate change in urban environments through intensive measurement campaigns planned for the Paris region this summer. From the studies, information will be derived that is key to making cities more resilient to future climate realities.

Life Sciences - Environment - 09.06.2022
Cyanobacteria use the lotus effect
Cyanobacteria use the lotus effect
Water repellency as the first step to life on land a billion years ago Water droplets simply roll off - and clean the surface and reduce infestation with fungal spores, for example. But not only plants have the "lotus effect," which Professor Wilhelm Barthlott of the University of Bonn discovered four decades ago.

Environment - 09.06.2022
Drought-Exposure History Improves Recovery of Grassland Communities from Subsequent Drought
Drought-Exposure History Improves Recovery of Grassland Communities from Subsequent Drought
When a plant community is exposed to drought, the different species undergo evolutionary changes. An international study with UZH participation now shows that this leads to improved resilience to future drought stress over time. The exposure to drought during previous generations in the field increases complementarity between offspring of different grassland species and thus makes them more resilient to subsequent drought.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.06.2022
How crops can better survive floods
How crops can better survive floods
Researchers from Freiburg and Utrecht show which signaling pathways make plants more resistant to flooding Extreme weather phenomena are on the rise worldwide, including frequent droughts and fires. Floods are also a clear consequence of climate change. For agriculture, a flooded field means major losses: about 15 percent of global crop losses are due to flooding.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.06.2022
Scientists compile an inventory of endangered microorganisms
Scientists compile an inventory of endangered microorganisms
Cryospheric ecosystems are some of the oldest on the planet. scientists have found that the microorganisms living in them have a unique genetic signature. They performed an inventory of the microorganisms in these ecosystems and complied the information into a database, which will be a useful resource for future studies on climate change microbiology.

Environment - Life Sciences - 08.06.2022
The secret lives of Darwin's finches reveal daily commutes the equivalent of 30 soccer fields
The secret lives of Darwin’s finches reveal daily commutes the equivalent of 30 soccer fields
Using radio transmitters, scientists have gained new insights into the behaviour of medium ground finches in the Galapagos Islands. A study led by McGill researchers reveals daily movement patterns covering an area equivalent to the size of 30 soccer fields. Until now researchers knew little about the secret lives of these birds, due in part to challenges studying them in their natural habitat, involving rough volcanic rock terrain and harsh climate conditions.

Life Sciences - Environment - 07.06.2022
Copper makes seed pods explode
Copper makes seed pods explode
Researchers identify the genes controlling the mechanical structure of exploding seed pods Plants have evolved numerous strategies to spread their seeds widely. Some scatter their seeds to the wind, while others tempt animals and birds to eat their seed-filled fruits. And a few rare plants - such as the popping cress Cardamine hirsuta - have evolved exploding seed pods that propel their seeds in all directions.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 07.06.2022
Researches decipher the migratory pattern of the smallest seabird in the Mediterranean
Researches decipher the migratory pattern of the smallest seabird in the Mediterranean
It had always been thought that the Mediterranean population of the European storm petrel —the smallest seabird in the Mediterranean— spent the year in this sea and that only a small part of the population migrated to the Atlantic during the winter season. Now, a study reveals that most of the European storm petrels that nest in the western Mediterranean move to the Atlantic Ocean as their main wintering area.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 03.06.2022
Ancient ocean floors could help search for critical minerals
Ancient ocean floors could help search for critical minerals
Studying ancient ocean floors could help discover minerals needed to produce electric cars and solar panels. Researchers at The University of Queensland led a collaborative study that examined the remnants of ocean floors in eastern Australia and central Asia and applied a method to date the age of calcite trapped inside.

Environment - 02.06.2022
Scientists estimate the land area needed to save species
Scientists estimate the land area needed to save species
64 million km2 - 44% of Earth's land area - requires conservation to safeguard biodiversity. This is revealed in a new study led by biologists of the University of Amsterdam, that was published on 3 June 2022 in the prestigious journal Science. The international research team used advanced geospatial algorithms to map the optimal areas for conserving terrestrial species and ecosystems across the world.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.06.2022
The largest genomic catalogue of wild chimpanzees
The largest genomic catalogue of wild chimpanzees
New genomic tools shed light on the evolutionary history of chimpanzees and contribute to their conservation An international research team led by the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE), the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology (MPI EVA) and Leipzig University has compiled the largest genomic catalogue of wild chimpanzee populations in Africa.

Environment - Economics / Business - 02.06.2022
New tool for emergency planning during extreme floods
New tool for emergency planning during extreme floods
The Mobiliar Lab for Natural Risks of the University of Bern shows that far greater floods are possible in Switzerland than previously assumed. These extreme events underscore the importance of supra-regional emergency planning. A new modeling tool is designed to help manage large floods. Even experts could not have imagined the extent of these floods: Nobody had expected the devastating storms of summer 2021 in Germany.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 02.06.2022
In wake of hurricane, microbial ecosystem remarkably resilient
In wake of hurricane, microbial ecosystem remarkably resilient
Study: In wake of hurricane, microbial ecosystem remarkably resilient Findings offer hope for coastal regions even as climate change intensifies storm risk After sustaining seemingly catastrophic hurricane damage, a primordial groundcover vital to sustaining a multitude of coastal lifeforms bounced back to life in a matter of months.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.06.2022
Canada ranks third worldwide in permeable landscapes for wildlife
Canada ranks third worldwide in permeable landscapes for wildlife
Science, Health & Technology Alex Walls Canada ranks third in the world for animal movement between protected areas, finds new UBC research. Researchers created the first global map of where mammals are most likely to move between protected areas, such as national parks and nature reserves. Lead author Dr. Angela Brennan, a research associate at the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability, says she hopes the data will help countries measure their success at protecting biodiversity over time.

Environment - 02.06.2022
The consequences of climate change in the Alps are visible from space
The consequences of climate change in the Alps are visible from space
Global warming has a particularly pronounced impact on the Alpine region. Like the Arctic, this European mountain range is becoming greener. Writing , researchers from the University of Lausanne and the University of Basel have now used satellite data to show that vegetation above the tree line has increased in nearly 80% of the Alps.

Life Sciences - Environment - 01.06.2022
New genomic tools shed light on the evolutionary history of chimpanzees and contribute to their conservation
An international research team led by the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE) in Barcelona, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology (MPI-EVA), the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and Leipzig University has compiled the largest genomic catalogue of wild chimpanzee populations in Africa.

Environment - Life Sciences - 01.06.2022
Photos of Amazon animals supply extensive collection of biodiversity data
Photos of Amazon animals supply extensive collection of biodiversity data
An international team of researchers has published the largest collection of data from camera traps on Amazonian rainforest animals. The collection currently encompasses over 120,000 registers, plus information on time and location. It will improve research on the abundance, diversity and habitat conditions of jaguars, toucans, harpy eagles and many other endangered rainforest species and contribute to their protection.