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Life Sciences - Health - 13.04.2022
Led team creates first comprehensive map of human blood stem cell development
UCLA scientists and colleagues have created a first-of-its-kind roadmap that traces each step in the development of blood stem cells in the human embryo, providing scientists with a blueprint for producing fully functional blood stem cells in the lab. The research, published today , could help expand treatment options for blood cancers like leukemia and inherited blood disorders such as sickle cell disease, said Dr. Hanna Mikkola of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA, who led the study.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.04.2022
The origins and ID of pancreatic endocrine cells
UNIGE Scientists show that endocrine stem cells in the pancreas disappear after birth, and detail the genetic identity of the different types of pancreatic hormone-producing cells. Pedro Herrera's team reports new discoveries in the knowledge of the mechanisms of pancreatic cell formation, as well as in the gene expression profile defining the identity of the different types of endocrine cells of the pancreas.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.04.2022
Discovered young neurons in the cerebral cortex of adult humans
Discovered young neurons in the cerebral cortex of adult humans
A study involving the University of Valencia (UV), the Centre for Biomedical Research in Mental Health Networking Biomedical Research Centre (CIBERSAM), Hospital La Fe and the INCLIVA Health Research Institute shows that there are immature or young neurons in the human cerebral cortex during adult life.

Health - Pharmacology - 13.04.2022
COVID-19 therapy: better in combination than alone
How a well-known drug can become a game changer - A joint press release by CharitÚ, the MDC and FU Berlin There is a steadily growing arsenal of drugs for COVID-19. Researchers from CharitÚ - Universitńtsmedizin Berlin, the Max DelbrŘck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) and Freie Universitńt (FU) Berlin have studied the mechanisms of action of antiviral and anti-inflammatory drugs.

Chemistry - Environment - 13.04.2022
More developed countries dumping toxic e-waste in Global South, University of Toronto researchers find
People in mainland China and the Global South suffer the brunt of emissions of toxic chemicals from consumer goods used in more-developed countries, according to a new study. Researchers, including Frank Wania and Kate Tong of the University of Toronto Scarborough, sayá"core regions" in Europe, North America and parts of Asia have offloaded ápolybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) emissions to less developed parts of the world.

Social Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 13.04.2022
Busy mothers breastfed less in 19th century Netherlands: study
Busy mothers breastfed less in 19th century Netherlands: study
A new study from the Netherlands has revealed breastfeeding infants may not have been standard practice among mothers in the 1800s, as common perception would suggest. Led by Western biological anthropologist Andrea L. Waters-Rist , the study found unusually low rates of breast-fed infants at a 19th century rural Dutch village, likely because the mothers then were busy working.

Physics - 13.04.2022
Rotating blue laser light reveals unimagined dynamics in living cells
Rotating blue laser light reveals unimagined dynamics in living cells
Using a novel laser-scanning microscope scientists observe processes in cells changing within milliseconds When cities transform into a colorful world of lights as darkness falls, it's often only possible to estimate their contours, which depending on the perspective can draw the attention to key details or trivia.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 13.04.2022
Enhancer-promoter interactions - distance matters
Enhancer-promoter interactions - distance matters
When and where a gene is transcribed in a living organism often depends on its physical interactions with distal genomic regulatory regions called enhancers. Researchers in the group of Luca Giorgetti have thrown light on how such interactions control transcription thanks to a novel ingenious experimental approach combined with mathematical modelling.

Environment - Economics / Business - 13.04.2022
Your morning coffee could hasten species’ extinction
Ahead of a global biodiversity convention, researchers find consumption in Europe, North America, and East Asia primarily drives species extinction risk in other countries. As negotiations before the 15 th Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (COP-15) take place, international research has quantified the impact of human consumption on species extinction risk.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 13.04.2022
How healthy and safe areáprocessed plant-basedámeat alternatives?
How healthy and safe areáprocessed plant-basedámeat alternatives?
Processed meat alternatives like plant-based burger patties, sausages and nuggets are being marketed as a more sustainable, healthy alternative to meat, but are they all safe or nutritious? Replacing meat with foods like legumes, beans and grains is nothing new - in fact, societies around the world have opted for plant-based diets for millennia.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.04.2022
First comprehensive map of human blood stem cell development
First comprehensive map of human blood stem cell development
A first-of-its-kind roadmap traces each step in the development of blood stem cells in the human embryo, providing scientists with a blueprint for producing fully functional blood stem cells in the lab, reports a team led by UCL and UCLA scientists. The research could help expand treatment options for blood cancers like leukaemia and inherited blood disorders such as sickle cell disease.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 13.04.2022
Diverse life forms may have evolved earlier than previously thought
Diverse life forms may have evolved earlier than previously thought
Diverse microbial life existed on Earth at least 3.75 billion years ago, suggests a new study led by UCL researchers that challenges the conventional view of when life began. For the study, published in Science Advances , the research team analysed a fist-sized rock from Quebec, Canada, estimated to be between 3.75 and 4.28 billion years old.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.04.2022
One step closer to creating new hair follicles
One step closer to creating new hair follicles
In a new study, Yale researchers take a unique approach to identify the molecular signals that induce a critical trigger for hair follicle formation and regeneration. The findings could prove crucial for developing new therapies to re-grow hair - and provide a blueprint for unraveling other mysteries of tissue growth at the cellular level.

Social Sciences - 12.04.2022
Bushfires disproportionately impact Indigenous Australians
Bushfires disproportionately impact Indigenous Australians
First Nations Australians suffered worse impacts from the Black Summer bushfires due to in appropriate planning and unsuitable interventions by authorities during the crisis, researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) argue. The researchers have published a report examining the first-hand experiences of Indigenous Australians during the 2019-2020 bushfires, and say the findings are also reflected in the current northern New South Wales floods.

Health - Psychology - 12.04.2022
Worries about finances outstrip concerns about catching Covid-19
More people are now more worried about their finances (38%), than catching Covid-19 (33%), find UCL researchers as part of the Covid-19 Social Study. The proportion of people concerned about finances is up from 32% in January 2022 - the highest level since the start of the pandemic two years ago - and likely reflects the pressures felt by the 'cost of living crisis'.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 12.04.2022
How to find anti-cancer agents
How to find anti-cancer agents
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and the Italian Institute of Technology IIT have developed a novel substance that disables a protein in the cell skeleton, leading to cell death. In this way, substances of this type can prevent, for example, the growth of tumours. To accomplish this, the researchers combined a structural biological method with the computational design of active agents.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.04.2022
HIV: The Antibodies of ’Post-treatment Controllers’
A very small percentage of people with HIV-1, known as "post-treatment controllers” (PTCs), are able to control their infection after interrupting all antiretroviral therapy. Understanding the fundamental mechanisms that govern their immune response is essential in order to develop HIV-1 vaccines, novel therapeutic strategies to achieve remission, or both.

Environment - Chemistry - 12.04.2022
How to design safe and sustainable chemicals
How to design safe and sustainable chemicals
With many human-made chemicals, problems regarding public health and the environment become apparent only years after their widespread use. A team of researchers from the University of Amsterdam and Utrecht University now propose a way to change that. In an article in the journal 'Chemosphere' they present a method for (re)designing safe and sustainable chemicals.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.04.2022
B or not to B: Insights in the regulation of anti-viral immunity
Researchers delve into the inner workings of the antibody immune response, finding key differences in the metabolism of two closely related immune cell subsets. Protection against viral diseases is a key role of our body's immune response, where antibodies are generated to seek out invading species and either neutralise or mark them for destruction.

Health - Environment - 12.04.2022
High concentrations of PFAS in blood may be linked to higher diabetes in middle-aged women
PFAS, a group of so-called "forever chemicals,” are ubiquitous in our environment-in our rivers, in our clothes, seeping through the cooking utensils in our kitchens. And, according to a new University of Michigan study, high concentrations of these chemicals are associated with increased risk to diabetes in midlife women-similar to the risks posed by cigarette smoking and being overweight.