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Astronomy / Space - History / Archeology - 20.10.2022
Discovery of extracts from a lost astronomical catalogue
Discovery of extracts from a lost astronomical catalogue
They prove that Hipparchus' data were significantly more accurate than those of another catalogue composed centuries later. Researchers from the CNRS, Sorbonne Université and Tyndale House (affiliated with the University of Cambridge) have recently found fragments of the Star Catalogue composed by the Greek astronomer Hipparchus during the 2nd century BC.

Linguistics / Literature - History / Archeology - 14.10.2022
New edition of the Mesopotamian classic Epic of Gilgamesh , by two IPOA lecturers
New edition of the Mesopotamian classic Epic of Gilgamesh , by two IPOA lecturers
Cultura Researchers Adelina Millet and Lluís Feliu, members of the Institute of Ancient Near East Studies (IPOA) of the University of Barcelona, have published a new edition of the Epic of Gilgamesh , the oldest literary epic and a classic in universal literature. Recent archaeological findings led to an update of the Epic, of which a first edition was published in Catalan in 2007.

History / Archeology - 05.10.2022
New data reveals impact of contact with Pacific nations
New data reveals impact of contact with Pacific nations
Population decline following European settlement in Pacific island nations was far greater than previously thought, according to ANU research. Pacific Island nations suffered severe depopulation from introduced diseases as a consequence of contact with European vessels, a new study from The Australian National University (ANU) shows.

History / Archeology - 04.10.2022
A research in the Abric del Pastor of Alcoi manages to isolate an episode of Neanderthal occupation
A research in the Abric del Pastor of Alcoi manages to isolate an episode of Neanderthal occupation
A research by six scientific institutions in the Abric del Pastor of Alcoi, including the universities of Valencia (UV) and Alicante (UV), has managed, through an interdisciplinary approach, to characterise a moment in the life of a Neanderthal group. This research has reduced the palimpsest effect (superimposition of multiple occupation episodes on the same surface over a long period of time) to a time resolution very close to the life of said group.

Environment - History / Archeology - 26.09.2022
Ancient footprints on UK beach record demise of a biodiversity hotspot
A team of archaeologists and geographers from The University of Manchester have discovered that hundreds of ancient animal and human footprints found on a beach in Merseyside record a major decline in large animal diversity in Ancient Britain. Their new research, published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution , includes a new programme of radiocarbon dating which shows that the most species-rich footprint beds at Formby Point are much older than previously thought.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 26.09.2022
Bringing up baby, 10,000 years ago
Bringing up baby, 10,000 years ago
Further finds from an infant burial in Italy provides insights on the use of baby carriers and family heirlooms in prehistory, an UdeM-led study reveals. CONTENU - It seems logical enough: even in their earliest history, humans must have needed something to carry their babies around in as they moved from place to place.

Environment - History / Archeology - 22.09.2022
Past climate of Cape Town revealed in study
New insights into the history of South Africa's climate have been revealed. In a project that spanned seven years, the Tracing History Trust, with support from Cardiff University and Wits University, has digitised and transcribed the Dutch East India Company's day registers which were written between 1652 to 1791.

History / Archeology - 19.09.2022
Google Maps for 14th to 17th century trade routes
If you would like to know how long it took to get from Eindhoven to Deventer around 600 years ago, the updated version of Viabundus - which is like a variation of Google Maps for the 1350-1650 period - can be used to calculate just how much time was needed. One of the things that the project's researchers managed to achieve this year was a more accurate map of Brabant's road network.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 15.09.2022
Beads show European trade in African interior used Indigenous routes
Beads show European trade in African interior used Indigenous routes
Tiny glass beads discovered in mountain caves about 25 miles from the shores of Lake Malawi in eastern-central Africa provide evidence that European trade in the continent's hinterland was built on Indigenous trade routes from the coast to the interior that had existed for centuries, according to a study co-authored by Yale anthropologist Jessica Thompson.

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 15.09.2022
Beads from African interior reveal traces of European exploitation
Beads from African interior reveal traces of European exploitation
Tiny glass beads discovered in mountain caves about 25 miles from the shores of Lake Malawi in eastern-central Africa provide evidence that European trade in the continent's hinterland was built on Indigenous trade routes from the coast to the interior that had existed for centuries, according to a study co-authored by Yale anthropologist Jessica Thompson.

History / Archeology - 14.09.2022
New data on how Levantine art was made and how it has been preserved to date
New data on how Levantine art was made and how it has been preserved to date
Although Levantine art has been recognized as World Heritage rock art and Asset of Cultural Interest by the UNESCO, we still have little information on how these cave paintings, typical of the Mediterranean area about 7,500 years ago, were made. Now, a study published in the journal PLOS ONE on the Levantine art site in el Carche (Valencia, Spain) identifies for the first time four different formulas used by the prehistoric communities to get paint by mixing minerals.

History / Archeology - Art and Design - 12.09.2022
Gold of the Golden Coach originates from Suriname
Gold of the Golden Coach originates from Suriname
Together with the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands Institute for Conservation+Art+Science+ (NICAS) and Naturalis Biodiversity Center, the Amsterdam Museum conducted research into the origin of the gold of the Golden Coach. Where the gold leaf with which the coach is gilded came from has long been unknown.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 09.09.2022
The origins of donkey domestication
The origins of donkey domestication
The donkey has shaped the history of humankind, both as a source of power for farm work, and of transportation in sometimes hard to reach areas. To understand the history of the donkey's domestication, teams at the Centre for Anthropobiology and Genomics of Toulouse (CNRS/ Université Toulouse 3 Paul Sabatier) and scientists 1 from 37 laboratories around the world worked together to build and analyse the most complete panel of genomes ever studied for this animal.

History / Archeology - 06.09.2022
University of Warwick highlights the long struggle for scientific freedom in Ukraine
University of Warwick highlights the long struggle for scientific freedom in Ukraine
Historians show that Ukraine has been an important centre for scientific research over the past 150 years. Ukraine has also been at the heart of the struggle for scientific freedom. Understanding this history can help plan for the future of science in Ukraine. In a comment article in leading science journal, Nature , researchers at the University of Warwick highlight the long struggle for scientific freedom in Ukraine.

History / Archeology - Politics - 05.09.2022
New research highlights the Dutch role in Holocaust reparations negotiations
New research highlights the Dutch role in Holocaust reparations negotiations
Historian Lorena De Vita unravels impact of local and global security issues of 1952 In 1952, now 70 years ago, Wassenaar was the scene of a historic breakthrough.

Astronomy / Space - History / Archeology - 05.09.2022
Red Giant Betelgeuse was yellow some 2,000 years ago
Red Giant Betelgeuse was yellow some 2,000 years ago

History / Archeology - 02.09.2022
Researchers present Prime Minister Rutte with book on the parliamentary history of the 1970s
The issues that arose in the 1970s share striking similarities with our current crises, from energy crises and inflation to concerns about the quality of life on earth. Researchers from Radboud University have written a book about how Dutch parliament dealt with these issues in the 1970s. On 1 September, Prime Minister Rutte was presented with the first copy of this book.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 29.08.2022
Oldest case of a rare genetic condition discovered
Oldest case of a rare genetic condition discovered
A 1,000-year-old skeleton from Portugal has been uncovered with a rare genetic condition that gives men an extra X chromosome. A group of international researchers has uncovered evidence of a super rare genetic condition that gives men an extra X chromosome, reporting the oldest clinical case of Klinefelter Syndrome to date.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 25.08.2022
The Data that Keep on Giving
A 2016 Excavation in Greece Helps Provide Sweeping New Insights into the Evolution of Indo-European Languages Genetic data collected during an excavation of a Mycenaean tomb at Kastrouli near Delphi, Greece, have helped an interdisciplinary team including UC San Diego scientists unveil some of the mysteries of ancient patterns of human migration, culture and the evolution of Indo-European languages across eastern Europe and into West Asia 7,000 to 5,000 years ago.

Health - History / Archeology - 19.08.2022
Medieval monks were 'riddled with worms'
Medieval monks were ’riddled with worms’
Research examining traces of parasites in the remains of medieval Cambridge residents suggests that local friars were almost twice as likely as ordinary working townspeople to have intestinal worms - despite monasteries of the period having far more sanitary facilities. One possibility is that the friars manured their vegetable gardens with human faeces Piers Mitchell A new analysis of remains from medieval Cambridge shows that local Augustinian friars were almost twice as likely as the city's general population to be infected by intestinal parasites.