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Paleontology - History / Archeology - 18.08.2022
April the museum dinosaur still revealing new discoveries
April the museum dinosaur still revealing new discoveries
Recent research regarding a dinosaur nicknamed April which previously called Manchester Museum home has revealed rare new findings. Scientists made the discovery of gastroliths (stomach stones) inside the Tenontosaurus which is unusually rare. This represents the second oldest occurrence of gastroliths in an ornithopod dinosaur and the first to be identified in a more derived ornithopod.

History / Archeology - 10.08.2022
Prehistoric Brits used rare rock crystals to mark burial sites
Prehistoric Brits used rare rock crystals to mark burial sites
Distinctive and rare rock crystals were moved over long distances by Early Neolithic Brits and were used to mark their burial sites, according to groundbreaking new archaeological research. Evidence for the use of rock crystal - a rare type of perfectly transparent quartz which forms in large hexagonal gems - has occasionally been found at prehistoric sites in the British Isles, but little investigation has previously been done specifically into how the material was used and its potential significance.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 03.08.2022
Global Spread of Powdery Mildew through Migration and Trade
Global Spread of Powdery Mildew through Migration and Trade
The worldwide distribution of one of the most important cereal pathogens is the result of human activity. Researchers at the University of Zurich have traced the history and spread of wheat powdery mildew along wheat trade routes and found that mixing of genetic ancestries of related powdery mildew species played a central role in the evolution and adaptation of the pathogen.

Chemistry - History / Archeology - 01.08.2022
Researchers study historical developments of the periodic system of chemical elements
Researchers study historical developments of the periodic system of chemical elements
In the 1860s, the chemists, Lothar Meyer and Dmitri Mendeleev, independently presented the first periodic system. Since then, the well-known tabular arrangement of the elements has been the guiding principle of chemistry. A team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences and the Interdisciplinary Center for Bioinformatics at the University of Leipzig provides computational approaches based on extensive data sets from the Reaxys chemistry database that explain the development of the first periodic systems.

Environment - History / Archeology - 01.08.2022
The Bantu expansion took a rainforest route
The Bantu expansion took a rainforest route
Early Bantu speakers crossed through the dense Central African Rainforest 4,000 years ago The study used novel computational approaches and linguistic data from more than 400 Bantu languages to reconstruct the historic migration routes. The project was a collaboration between scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and researchers at the University of Auckland in New Zealand.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 28.07.2022
Prehistoric roots of 'cold sore' virus traced through ancient herpes DNA
Prehistoric roots of ’cold sore’ virus traced through ancient herpes DNA
Ancient genomes from the herpes virus that commonly causes lip sores - and currently infects some 3.7 billion people globally - have been uncovered and sequenced for the first time by an international team involving UCL scientists.

History / Archeology - Environment - 27.07.2022
Archaeological features identified at Seaford Head site  
Archaeological features identified at Seaford Head site  
The hidden archaeological potential of nationally important heritage site Seaford Head has been uncovered through a project involving the UCL Institute of Archaeology. The pilot study involving researchers from Archaeology South-East (ASE), part of UCL Institute of Archaeology, aimed to investigate how an archaeological site at risk from climate change accelerated coastal erosion can be rapidly recorded and communicated to the public before it is lost.

History / Archeology - 26.07.2022
Published the complete study of the Iberian site of Casa de Cabeza of Requena, where wine production for more than 2,000 years has been documented
A multidisciplinary team with the participation of David Quixal, Consuelo Mata, Yolanda Carrión and Guillem Pérez, professors at the University of Valencia (UV), together with UV researchers, just pu

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 18.07.2022
In Search of the Lost City of Natounia
Archaeological investigations offer up new findings on the history of Parthian settlements in Iraqi Kurdistan The mountain fortress of Rabana-Merquly in modern Iraqi Kurdistan was one of the major regional centres of the Parthian Empire, which extended over parts of Iran and Mesopotamia approximately 2,000 years ago.

Physics - History / Archeology - 18.07.2022
A physical-nuclear technique fixes for the first time the origin of Valencian flint and establishes new mobility parameters in the Paleolithic
A physical-nuclear technique fixes for the first time the origin of Valencian flint and establishes new mobility parameters in the Paleolithic
An international team of researchers, led by the professor of the University of Valencia (UV) Aleix Eixea, has applied for the first time a technique from nuclear physics, Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), to determine the origin of some flint from Middle and Upper Palaeolithic sites in the current provinces of Valencia and Alicante.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 17.07.2022
When did the genetic variations that make us human emerge?
The study of the genomes of our closest relatives, the Neanderthals and Denisovans, has opened up new research paths that can broaden our understanding of the evolutionary history of Homo sapiens. A study led by the UB has made an estimation of the time when some of the genetic variants that characterise our species emerged.

History / Archeology - 07.07.2022
Schedules and punctuality: requirements of modernity
Schedules and punctuality: requirements of modernity
If timetables and punctuality are an integral part of our society, it has not always been so. This is what Catherine Herr-Laporte, a doctoral student at the Chair in the History of Technology, has shown by studying the development of postal transport in France throughout the 18th century as part of her doctoral thesis on time and mobility.

History / Archeology - Agronomy / Food Science - 28.06.2022
An Age-Old Story: Farmers against Pests
An Age-Old Story: Farmers against Pests
As early as the Neolithic period, pests posed a threat to agricultural yields, as shown by the remains of mice and insects found in prehistoric wells by a Basel-led archaeological research team. However, there are also indications that people knew how to defend against these pests - for example, by switching to less vulnerable kinds of grain.

Environment - History / Archeology - 27.06.2022
Ancient world adapted to climate change
A new study shows how the ancient world adapted to climate change A new study of the ancient world of Anatolia - now Turkey - shows how they adapted to climate change but offers a warning for today's climate emergency. The efforts of ancient populations to minimise the impacts of climate change were undermined during longer climate shifts when it is combined with other events such as pandemics, earthquakes and wars - findings the lead author says offer scary parallels to the modern day.

History / Archeology - 24.06.2022
Prehistoric stele found in the funerary complex of Cañaveral de León
Prehistoric stele found in the funerary complex of Cañaveral de León
An international research that integrates experts from the universities of Durham, Seville, Southampton, Huelva and Gothenburg has just located a prehistoric stela, of the type known as 'warrior' in the burial complex of Cañaveral de León (Huelva). This is the second stela found in this site.

Linguistics / Literature - History / Archeology - 24.06.2022
Scientists apply genetic methods to linguistics
Scientists apply genetic methods to linguistics
Scientists have produced a series of maps showing historical migration events, including the migration of mountain farmers native to Upper Valais who began to settle in German-speaking Switzerland in the 13th century, by applying methods from population genetics - but using linguistic data rather than genes.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 23.06.2022
Population bottlenecks were common throughout human history
From contemporary and ancient DNA, UC Berkeley researchers estimated when population bottlenecks occurred for several hundred groups around the world and throughout recent human history. The colors indicate the number of generations the bottleneck or founder event preceded the individuals whose DNA was sequenced.

History / Archeology - 22.06.2022
Britains earliest humans
Britains earliest humans
Homo heidelbergensis may have occupied southern Britain between 560,000 and 620,000 years ago Archaeological discoveries made on the outskirts of Canterbury, Kent (England) confirm the presence of early humans in southern Britain between 560,000 and 620,000 years ago. The breakthrough, involving controlled excavations and radiometric dating, comes a century after stone tool artefacts were first uncovered at the site.

Architecture - History / Archeology - 22.06.2022
Renovating 19th-century buildings without losing their character
Renovating 19th-century buildings without losing their character
Researcher and architect Catarina Wall Gago has published a guide to renovation best practices, drawing on a study of historic housing in Lisbon, Oporto and Geneva.

History / Archeology - 18.06.2022
New study suggests mystery still surrounds what happened to the bodies of Waterloo militaries
New study suggests mystery still surrounds what happened to the bodies of Waterloo militaries
Were the bones of fallen Battle of Waterloo soldiers sold as fertiliser? Thousands of soldiers died on the Belgium battlefield yet very few human remains have been found. Now a new study by the University of Glasgow's Professor Tony Pollard suggests it is the most probable outcome of such a bloodied affair, but the archaeologist says it isn't quite a situation of 'case closed'.