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Health - Pharmacology - 27.04.2022
Researchers design nanochips that penetrate inside cells as mechanical drugs
Researchers design nanochips that penetrate inside cells as mechanical drugs
A research team put devices of 50 nanometre-thick —one thousandth of a hair's part— inside living cells in order to find their division process and alter it, and even destroy cells. The new study, which sheds light on the exploration pathways in the field of nanomedicine, includes the participation of the researchers Lluïsa Pérez-Garcia and Ezhil Amirthalingam, from the Faculty of Pharmacy and Food Sciences and the Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology of the University of Barcelona ( IN2UB ).

Health - Pharmacology - 26.04.2022
Liver fibrosis: the fatal signalling pathway
MHH research team clarifies how liver inflammation and scarring of liver tissue are connected At least five million people in Germany suffer from liver disease. Fibrosis, the pathological proliferation of connective tissue, plays an important role in many complications of chronic liver problems. Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are massively involved in this tissue remodelling.

Psychology - Pharmacology - 26.04.2022
Talk therapy may alleviate depression and improve quality of life for people with dementia
Talk therapy may alleviate depression and improve quality of life for people with dementia
Talking therapies may improve symptoms of depression for people with dementia, finds a new review led by UCL researchers, providing hope for a group who typically do not benefit from antidepressants. Feelings of anxiety and depression are common in people living with dementia and mild cognitive impairment, but the best way to treat these symptoms is currently unknown, as medicines often used to treat these symptoms may not be effective for people with dementia and may cause side effects.

Health - Pharmacology - 26.04.2022
Similar risks for those hospitalized with omicron, delta variants
Similar risks for those hospitalized with omicron, delta variants
Study finds similar risks for omicron, delta hospital patients The study found that patients with the omicron variant of COVID-19 were less likely to be hospitalized, but those who were admitted had care requirements similar to patients with the delta variant Patients hospitalized with the omicron or delta variants of COVID-19 required similar levels of respiratory support and intensive care, according to a new Johns Hopkins study, indicating that omicron infections should not be underestimated.

Health - Pharmacology - 25.04.2022
Retina is not sparged by SARS-CoV-2
Retina is not sparged by SARS-CoV-2
The list of diseases caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection is growing and now includes the retina. This is what suggest a prospective study by the Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) and the University of Geneva. The list of diseases caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection is growing and now includes the retina. This is what suggest a prospective study by the Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) and the University of Geneva , in collaboration with the Adolphe de Rothschild Memorial Clinical Research Center for Ophthalmology.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.04.2022
Make-up of SARS-CoV-2 outer envelope for first time
Scientists from Cardiff University have detailed the molecular make-up of the fatty outer envelope of SARS-CoV-2 for the first time - and say it could prove an important new target for antivirals. The team's work on the viral lipid envelope showed it had significant differences to healthy host cell membranes, suggesting the potential for it to be selectively targeted.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 22.04.2022
Large-scale bovine vaccine study reveals the role of genetics in immune response
Large-scale bovine vaccine study reveals the role of genetics in immune response
In largest personalized immunogenetics study to date, computer scientist Yana Safonova discovers the DNA sequences that control vaccine response in cows, opening the door for further immunogenetics research in humans Vaccines are a critical tool in the protection of humans and animals against pathogens, but a major challenge for vaccine development is understanding why vaccines work better for some individuals than others.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.04.2022
The why behind mild COVID-19
All-Luxembourg study helps to anticipate a personal COVID-19 health trajectory From the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, the majority of published studies have focused on severe COVID-19 patients in order to understand the causes of critical illness. However, it is equally, if not more important to understand the protective immune factors in our body.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.04.2022
Targeting ’anti-tumor’ genes to provide better treatment for leukemia
Scientists discuss the possibility of offering personalized treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia by regulating the expression of a gene known for its "anti-tumorous" properties. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is one of the most common blood cancers in adults. The disease originates in B cells - the part of the immune system that produces antibodies - and then evolves slowly, typically affecting older people.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.04.2022
Health research overlooks important differences between sexes
Q&As Erik Rolfsen You might be surprised to learn how rarely health research accounts for the fact that male and female bodies are different. Researchers from UBC's women's health research cluster and department of psychology have published an analysis of 3,193 neuroscience and psychiatry studies from 2009 and 2019.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 20.04.2022
UCLA-developed technology enables single-cell sorting by function
UCLA-developed technology enables single-cell sorting by function
For nearly 40 years, drugmakers have used genetically engineered cells as tiny drug factories. Such cells can be programmed to secrete compounds that yield drugs used to treat cancer and autoimmune conditions such as arthritis. Efforts to develop and manufacture new biologic treatments may gain from a new technology for quickly sorting single, live cells in a standard laboratory setup.

Health - Pharmacology - 20.04.2022
Infertility: New Avenues to Understand the Harmful Effects of Chemotherapy
Infertility: New Avenues to Understand the Harmful Effects of Chemotherapy
Infertility is a public health problem affecting millions of couples in France. Among the possible causes, chemotherapy has been singled out as having particularly harmful effects on the fertility of both women and men. In order to better prevent and restore fertility in cancer survivors, understanding the mechanisms behind these negative effects is a priority.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.04.2022
New therapeutic option for head and neck carcinomas
The various manifestations of head and neck carcinomas rank sixth in frequency worldwide and are fatal for about half a million people every year. In a quarter of cases, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) and, currently, is not always treatable. A research team led by Lorenz Kadletz-Wanke from MedUni Vienna's Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery has now discovered a new therapeutic option in the context of a study.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.04.2022
Maximising the effectiveness of therapeutic vaccines a step closer
Maximising the effectiveness of therapeutic vaccines a step closer
Scientists at UCL have significantly boosted the effectiveness of a therapeutic vaccine designed to control chronic hepatitis B (HBV) infection, after uncovering and thwarting 'the enemy within'. Published in Science Translational Medicine , researchers say the findings in mice are a breakthrough in the field of vaccine development, as they reveal how to enhance the antiviral T cell response that therapeutic vaccines are intended to trigger.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.04.2022
Tumors partially destroyed with sound don’t come back
Technique pioneered in rats at the University of Michigan could improve outcomes for cancer and neurological conditions Noninvasive sound technology developed at the University of Michigan breaks down liver tumors in rats, kills cancer cells and spurs the immune system to prevent further spread-an advance that could lead to improved cancer outcomes in humans.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.04.2022
Stroke cuts life expectancy by one third
Almost two thirds of acute stroke patients fail to survive more than a decade and have high risk of recurrence, prompting researchers to call for better patient care. University of Queensland researchers analysed data from more than 300,000 patients admitted to hospital following a sudden stroke between 2008 and 2017 in Australia and New Zealand.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.04.2022
Blood group as a marker for thrombosis risk in cancer patients
Blood group as a marker for thrombosis risk in cancer patients
A MedUni Vienna study found evidence that people with cancer and non-O blood group such as A, B or AB are at increased risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE), blood clots in the veins. The study was recently published in the journal "Blood Advances". VTE includes deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a blood clot that typically forms in the deep veins of the leg, and pulmonary embolism (PE), a life-threatening condition that occurs when a blood clot breaks free and lodges in the pulmonary arteries of the lungs.

Health - Pharmacology - 13.04.2022
COVID-19 therapy: better in combination than alone
How a well-known drug can become a game changer - A joint press release by Charité, the MDC and FU Berlin There is a steadily growing arsenal of drugs for COVID-19. Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) and Freie Universität (FU) Berlin have studied the mechanisms of action of antiviral and anti-inflammatory drugs.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.04.2022
HIV: The Antibodies of ’Post-treatment Controllers’
A very small percentage of people with HIV-1, known as "post-treatment controllers” (PTCs), are able to control their infection after interrupting all antiretroviral therapy. Understanding the fundamental mechanisms that govern their immune response is essential in order to develop HIV-1 vaccines, novel therapeutic strategies to achieve remission, or both.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.04.2022
B or not to B: Insights in the regulation of anti-viral immunity
Researchers delve into the inner workings of the antibody immune response, finding key differences in the metabolism of two closely related immune cell subsets. Protection against viral diseases is a key role of our body's immune response, where antibodies are generated to seek out invading species and either neutralise or mark them for destruction.
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