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Results 41 - 60 of 4823.


Physics - Electroengineering - 20.12.2023
Unconventional magnets: stress reduces frustration
Unconventional magnets: stress reduces frustration
An international research team recently demonstrated how magnetism can be actively changed by pressure. Magnetism occurs depending on how electrons behave. For example, the elementary particles can generate an electric current with their charge and thereby induce a magnetic field. However, magnetism can also arise through the collective alignment of the magnetic moments (spins) in a material.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.12.2023
Permafrost: a ticking time bomb beneath our feet
Permafrost: a ticking time bomb beneath our feet
Nearly a quarter of the Earth's land surface is permanently frozen. These areas, known as permafrost, are found in northern polar regions and at high altitudes.

Chemistry - Physics - 20.12.2023
How is an ionic liquid structured when it comes into contact with a wall?
Publication of the Physics Laboratory and Chemistry Laboratory in the journal Langmuir on November 16, 2023. News by CNRS Chemistry on December 19, 2023. Water flowing over soluble rocks can create patterns of multiple troughs bordered by sharp ridges. By combining field measurements, a numerical model and laboratory experiments, a team led by the MSC laboratory (CNRS/Université Paris Cité), in collaboration with the LPG (CNRS/Nantes Université/Université d'Angers) and the RDP (CNRS/ENS de Lyon/Inrae) has shown that the appearance of these shapes results from a geometric mechanism.

Law - Politics - 20.12.2023
Study analyses crimes against nature and their consequences
The Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) has prepared a study approaching crimes against nature from the perspective of international law. This article takes the war in Iraq between 2014 and 2017 as a reference and has been published in the international scientific journal Crime, Justice and Social Democracy.

Life Sciences - 20.12.2023
First step towards synthetic CO2 fixation in living cells
First step towards synthetic CO2 fixation in living cells
Three modules forming a new-to-nature CO2 fixation cycle successfully implemented in E.coli Synthetic biology offers the opportunity to build biochemical pathways for the capture and conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2). Researchers at the Max-Planck-Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology have developed a synthetic biochemical cycle that directly converts CO2 into the central building block Acetyl-CoA.

Astronomy / Space - Environment - 20.12.2023
2023: A Year of Research Successes at TU Graz
At Graz University of Technology (TU Graz) in 2023, important discoveries were made, new insights gained and exciting information gleaned. An end-of-year review. TU Graz in Space In 2013, the small satellite TUGSAT-1 was Austria's first satellite in space. It was built at TU Graz and has been observing the earth from low earth orbit ever since.

Health - 20.12.2023
Childhood trauma increases risk of chronic pain in adulthood
New findings underscore the urgency of addressing adverse childhood experiences, taking steps to mitigate their long-term impact on people's health  Physical, sexual, or emotional abuse, or neglect, either alone or combined with other types of childhood trauma, increases the risk of chronic pain and related disability in adulthood, according to new research.

Health - 20.12.2023
The stomach bug that may raise your risk of Alzheimer’s disease
McGill study links bacterial infection with moderate but significant increase in the risk of Alzheimer's disease in older adults A common stomach bacteria found in two thirds of the world population may be linked to a higher risk of Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests. The study, published in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association , investigated whether a clinically apparent Helicobacter pylori (H.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.12.2023
New study sheds light on connection between microbiome and kidney stones
New study sheds light on connection between microbiome and kidney stones
A new study from Western University and Lawson Health Research Institute published in the journal Microbiome has found changes in the microbiome in multiple locations in the body are linked to the formation of kidney stones. The human microbiome comprises trillions of microorganisms, including healthy bacteria.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.12.2023
Satellite analysis of rivers could provide improved flood warnings
A new way to monitor the flow of rivers from satellites could provide a valuable early warning system for flood risk. A new way to monitor the flow of rivers from satellites could provide a valuable early warning system for flood risk, scientists say. University of Glasgow researchers have developed the first method of measuring the speed of river flows by analysing video footage captured from orbit.

Life Sciences - 20.12.2023
Wildflowers increasingly doing without insect pollinators
Wildflowers increasingly doing without insect pollinators
Scientists at the CNRS and the University of Montpellier 1 have discovered that flowering plants growing in farmland are increasingly doing without insect pollinators. As reproduction becomes more difficult for them in an environment depleted in pollinating insects, the plants are evolving towards self-fertilisation.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.12.2023
New study from the RVC explores malaria invasion to help develop life-saving vaccine
Last Updated: 20 Dec 2023 16:00:21 Researchers from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) and University of Oxford have led an innovative project investigating the progression of malaria infection and the role of the parasite to better aid the development of an effective malaria vaccine and significantly reduce rates of deaths from the disease.

Health - 20.12.2023
HIV drugs might help prevent multiple sclerosis, large new study suggests
Dr Elaine Kingwell (UCL Epidemiology & Health Care) discusses her study, with Dr Kyla Mckay (Karolinska Institutet), that shows antiretroviral therapy for HIV can influence the risk of developing MS. Over the last decade,  several case studies  have reported that people with multiple sclerosis (MS) who started antiretroviral therapy for HIV (to keep the virus in check) subsequently found that their MS symptoms had either disappeared completely or the disease progression had slowed considerably.

Chemistry - Campus - 20.12.2023
CMU-Designed Artificially Intelligent Coscientist Automates Scientific Discovery
A non-organic intelligent system has for the first time designed, planned and executed a chemistry experiment, Carnegie Mellon researchers report in the Dec. 21 issue of the journal Nature (doi:10.1038/s41586'023 -06792-0). "We anticipate that intelligent agent systems for autonomous scientific experimentation will bring tremendous discoveries, unforeseen therapies and new materials.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.12.2023
Using AI, MIT researchers identify a new class of antibiotic candidates
These compounds can kill methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a bacterium that causes deadly infections. Using a type of artificial intelligence known as deep learning , MIT researchers have discovered a class of compounds that can kill a drug-resistant bacterium that causes more than 10,000 deaths in the United States every year.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.12.2023
Using molecular 'cookie cutters' to view membrane protein organization
Using molecular ’cookie cutters’ to view membrane protein organization
Protein organization is key to protein function - but difficult to uncover for membrane proteins. A new Yale-developed method overcomes the biggest challenges. The membrane that encases a biological cell is not simply a barrier; it is chock full of proteins involved in all sorts of critical biological functions.

History / Archeology - Physics - 19.12.2023
Mesopotamian bricks unveil the strength of Earth's ancient magnetic field
Mesopotamian bricks unveil the strength of Earth’s ancient magnetic field
Ancient bricks inscribed with the names of Mesopotamian kings have yielded important insights into a mysterious anomaly in Earth's magnetic field 3,000 years ago, according to a new study involving UCL researchers. The research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) , describes how changes in the Earth's magnetic field imprinted on iron oxide grains within ancient clay bricks, and how scientists were able to reconstruct these changes from the names of the kings inscribed on the bricks.

Environment - 19.12.2023
The Colour of Dragonflies Changes throughout the Year
The Colour of Dragonflies Changes throughout the Year
The colour of dragonfly communities reacts to seasonal variation in solar radiation. Over the last 30 years, however, this colour pattern has changed - probably as a result of climate change. In a new study, researchers at Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg (JMU) in Bavaria, Germany, have discovered that the colour of dragonfly communities reacts to seasonal fluctuations in solar radiation.

Health - 19.12.2023
FWF funding for research into new treatment options for prostate cancer
Many patients with prostate cancer develop androgen-independent tumor growth, which is referred to as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In these patients, activation of the androgen receptor (AR) in the tumors no longer requires androgen stimulation, and therapy with androgen inhibitors becomes ineffective.

Electroengineering - Transport - 19.12.2023
Preventing power quality issues caused by electric vehicle charging
Preventing power quality issues caused by electric vehicle charging
Along with ElaadNL, PhD researcher Tim Slangen studied the phenomenon known as supraharmonic disturbances, which can adversely affect the operation and efficiency of electrical appliances. With the growing and obvious concerns about climate change, the transition from fossil to renewable energy is accelerating.