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Environment - Earth Sciences - 28.11.2023
Early Humans in the Paleolithic Age: More Than Just Game on the Menu
Early Humans in the Paleolithic Age: More Than Just Game on the Menu
In a study published in the journal "Scientific Reports," researchers from the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment (SHEP) at the University of Tübingen show that early humans of the Middle Paleolithic had a more varied diet than previously assumed. The analysis of a site in the Zagros Mountains in Iran reveals that around 81,000 to 45,000 years ago, the local hominins hunted ungulates as well as tortoises and carnivores.

Environment - Life Sciences - 28.11.2023
Protection of Highly Threatened Sharks and Rays Inadequate
Paleontology Sharks, rays and skates are the ocean's most threatened vertebrate group. Research led by the University of Zurich into their functional diversity has now revealed previously overlooked, critical conservation priorities, thereby underscoring the urgent need for targeted action to safeguard the threatened species.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 28.11.2023
Recalculations - How Can We Evaluate the Quality of Global Water Models?
Recalculations - How Can We Evaluate the Quality of Global Water Models?
In a study recently published in "Nature Water", the Analysis of Hydrological Systems group at the University of Potsdam, together with an international team, investigates the extent to which global water models agree with each other and with measured data. Using a new evaluation approach, the researchers can show in which climate regions the models agree and where they differ.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 28.11.2023
Sensitive ecosystems at risk from mine waste
Sensitive ecosystems at risk from mine waste
Nearly a third of the world's mine tailings are stored within or near protected conservation areas, University of Queensland research has found. A study led by UQ's Bora Aska , from the Sustainable Minerals Institute and School of the Environment, said these waste facilities pose an enormous risk to some of earth's most precious species and landscapes.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 27.11.2023
Crop diversification: a key to agriculture that is less dependent on pesticides
A major breakthrough has been unveiled in Nature Communications, revealing the results of an in-depth study on the beneficial effect of temporal crop diversification in reducing pesticide use in France. These results, based on a detailed analysis of more than 14,000 observations, pave the way for an in-depth understanding of the links between temporal crop diversity and dependence on pesticides, be they fungicides, insecticides or herbicides.

Environment - Health - 27.11.2023
Breathing highway air increases blood pressure, UW research finds 
For more than a century, American cities have been sliced and diced by high-traffic roadways. Interstate highways and wide arterials are now a defining feature of most metropolitan areas, their constant flow of cars spewing pollution into nearby neighborhoods. Researchers have only just begun to understand the health risks posed by all that pollution.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 24.11.2023
Research to continue on Arctic amplification and its global impacts
Research to continue on Arctic amplification and its global impacts
News from The Collaborative Research Centre "Arctic Amplification: Climate Relevant Atmospheric and Surface Processes and Feedback Mechanism (AC)³", which is headed by meteorologist Professor Manfred Wendisch from Leipzig University, is to enter its third funding phase. This was announced today (24 November 2023) by the German Research Foundation (DFG).

Life Sciences - Environment - 24.11.2023
How plants determine where light comes from
How plants determine where light comes from
With no visual organs, how can a plant know where light is coming from? In an original study combining biological and engineering expertise, the team led by Prof. Christian Fankhauser at the University of Lausanne, in collaboration with colleagues at EPFL, has deciphered a novel mechanism using the interface between air and water to generate a gradient of light "visible" to the plant.

Environment - Health - 24.11.2023
Prototyping grants #3: AI for research infrastructures, sustainable robots and antiviral nasal spray
Prototyping grants #3: AI for research infrastructures, sustainable robots and antiviral nasal spray
Innovations in AI-assisted social sciences, sustainable agriculture and medicine are being funded in the third round of prototyping grants by the Transfer Center enaCom at the University of Bonn. Whether an AI solution for better understanding of scientific communities, a robot that treats weeds differently depending on the species, or a preventive nasal spray - scientists from the University of Bonn and the University Hospital Bonn are developing innovative prototypes for practical challenges of our time.

Environment - 24.11.2023
European parrots have dialects
European parrots have dialects
Study is the first to document dialect differences in a parrot across its European range In the 50 years since monk parakeets arrived in Europe and spread across the continent, the species has developed distinct dialects that vary across countries and cities, according to a team of researchers from the Max Planck Institutes of Animal Behavior in Konstanz and for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany.

Environment - Life Sciences - 23.11.2023
Scientists explore hidden dynamics in peat under mosses and shrubs
Scientists explore hidden dynamics in peat under mosses and shrubs
Global warming is causing extensive changes to peatland vegetation in Europe and Western Siberia, with consequences for soil composition and the peatlands' ability to sequester carbon. An EPFL-led study has examined the mechanisms behind these complex processes. Peatlands are significant carbon sinks, meaning they're potential time bombs when it comes to greenhouse gas emissions.

Environment - Social Sciences - 22.11.2023
Durability: young people use their phones longer
Durability: young people use their phones longer
Young Swiss use their smartphones for almost three years before replacing them. That's almost a year longer than in 2016, according to the latest JAMESfocus report from ZHAW and Swisscom. While technical features and price remain central for young people when buying a cell phone, sustainability criteria are also gaining in importance .

Environment - 22.11.2023
Q&A: How can Canada best meet its commitment to protecting 30% of its land by 2030?
Results from new McGill University study suggest the key to maximizing our ability to protect future biodiversity depends on creating a new national strategy for protected areas prioritizing Canada's rich biodiversity At last year's COP15 conference in Montreal, the Government of Canada set the goal of conserving 30 percent of the country's land and water by 2030.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 21.11.2023
The Solar Forest
A new Weizmann Institute study shows that building solar farms in arid regions is a far more effective way to tackle the climate crisis than planting forests A verdant forest is one of the most iconic symbols of the power of nature, from the abundance of plant and animal life that shelters among its thick vegetation to the positive impact it has on Earth's climate, thanks in part to photosynthesis, which removes carbon dioxide from the air, thereby mitigating the effects of global warming.

Environment - Innovation - 21.11.2023
Sustainability transitions in energy, mobility, food: Research shifts focus from future goals to real-world change processes
Highway tunnel in mountain. Traffic on the road. Transportation from above. Cars as a source of air pollution. Existing consumption and production systems, which use natural resources to meet societal needs for food, shelter, energy and health, are unsustainable. Although researchers from different disciplines have long investigated how these systems can become more sustainable, scientists from socio-technical and socio-environmental research communities are now seeking to join forces.

Environment - Innovation - 21.11.2023
New technology can collect CO2 from a truck's exhaust pipe
New technology can collect CO2 from a truck's exhaust pipe
EPFL spin-off Qaptis has developed a system that can cut freight trucks' carbon emissions by up to 90%.

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.11.2023
Blood of glaciers: how an alga adapts to living in snow
Blood of glaciers: how an alga adapts to living in snow
In the spring, Alpine glaciers sometimes don a sheer red or orangish veil. Known as 'red snow' or 'blood snow', this phenomenon is caused by the blooming of Sanguina nivaloides , a microscopic alga. Scientists from the CNRS, the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Météo-France, INRAE, and Université Grenoble Alpes 1 turned their attention to this organism, which forms the pillar of a snowy ecosystem still poorly understood.

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.11.2023
'Blood of the glaciers': how an algae adapts to life in the snow
’Blood of the glaciers’: how an algae adapts to life in the snow
In spring, Alpine glaciers sometimes turn a thin layer of red or orange. This phenomenon, known as "glacier blood", is due to the proliferation of a microscopic alga called Sanguina nivaloides . Scientists 1 from CNRS, CEA, Météo-France, INRAE and Grenoble Alpes University have been studying this organism, which forms the backbone of a little-known snow ecosystem.

Health - Environment - 21.11.2023
Report reveals the human cost of climate inaction
New projections from the 2023 Lancet Countdown report reveals a world moving in the wrong direction on climate change, and how delayed action is a growing threat to our health A global team of researchers, including from the University of Sydney have presented new findings, in the eighth annual global report of the Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change , with new global projections revealing the grave and mounting threat to our health from  delayed action on climate change.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 20.11.2023
Innovative aquaculture system turns waste wood into nutritious seafood
Innovative aquaculture system turns waste wood into nutritious seafood
Researchers hoping to rebrand a marine pest as a nutritious food have developed the world's first system of farming shipworms, which they have renamed 'Naked Clams'. Naked Clams taste like oysters, they're highly nutritious and they can be produced with a really low impact on the environment. Dr David Willer These long, white saltwater clams are the world's fastest-growing bivalve and can reach 30cm long in just six months.