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Health - Electroengineering - 09.07.2024
AI-powered antenna revolutionizes bone fracture diagnosis
AI-powered antenna revolutionizes bone fracture diagnosis
A University of Waterloo engineer has paired inexpensive wireless communication antennas with artificial intelligence (AI) to improve how doctors can detect bone fractures. Determining bone fractures using traditional diagnostic methods such as x-rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) takes time - such equipment is not readily available in ambulances or primary care facilities and, with health care services in high demand, many people have to wait for an x-ray or scan once they arrive at the hospital.

Electroengineering - 09.07.2024
Smarter incentives prevent grid congestion
Smarter incentives prevent grid congestion
Doctoral students Bart van der Holst and Gijs Verhoeven investigated financial measures for grid operators to make better use of the existing grid capacity. Our electricity grid cannot keep up with the energy transition. New schools, businesses and neighborhoods have to wait for a connection and solar panels are already switched off at peak times.

Physics - Electroengineering - 05.07.2024
A 2D device for quantum cooling
A 2D device for quantum cooling
EPFL engineers have created a device that can efficiently convert heat into electrical voltage at temperatures lower than that of outer space. The innovation could help overcome a significant obstacle to the advancement of quantum computing technologies, which require extremely low temperatures to function optimally.

Health - Electroengineering - 02.07.2024
Implantable microphone could lead to fully internal cochlear implants
This tiny, biocompatible sensor may overcome one of the biggest hurdles that prevent the devices from being completely implanted. Cochlear implants, tiny electronic devices that can provide a sense of sound to people who are deaf or hard of hearing, have helped improve hearing for more than a million people worldwide, according to the National Institutes of Health.

Physics - Electroengineering - 01.07.2024
Scientists observe record-setting electron mobility in a new crystal film
Scientists observe record-setting electron mobility in a new crystal film
The newly synthesized material could be the basis for wearable thermoelectric and spintronic devices. A material with a high electron mobility is like a highway without traffic. Any electrons that flow into the material experience a commuter's dream, breezing through without any obstacles or congestion to slow or scatter them off their path.

Physics - Electroengineering - 01.07.2024
Controlling electronics with light: the magnetite breakthrough
Controlling electronics with light: the magnetite breakthrough
Researchers at EPFL have discovered that by shining different wavelengths of light on a material called magnetite, they can change its state, making it more or less conducive to electricity. This could lead to the development of innovative materials for electronics. Magnetite is the oldest and strongest natural magnet.

Electroengineering - 27.05.2024
Moving Components in Miniature
Moving Components in Miniature
Electromagnetic engines can't be reduced to just any size. It takes clever engineering tricks to generate active movement in miniature format. Researchers in Bochum are constantly coming up with new technologies. Over the years, a great many technical components have been shrunk in size. But miniaturization reaches its limits when tiny systems are supposed to move actively, because conventional electromagnetic motors become inefficient when reduced to miniature format.

Electroengineering - Physics - 23.05.2024
Turning up the heat on next-generation semiconductors
Research sheds light on the properties of novel materials that could be used in electronics operating in extremely hot environments. The scorching surface of Venus, where temperatures can climb to 480 degrees Celsius (hot enough to melt lead), is an inhospitable place for humans and machines alike. One reason scientists have not yet been able to send a rover to the planet's surface is because silicon-based electronics can't operate in such extreme temperatures for an extended period of time.

Electroengineering - 07.05.2024
This sound-suppressing silk can create quiet spaces
This sound-suppressing silk can create quiet spaces
Researchers engineered a hair-thin fabric to create a lightweight, compact, and efficient mechanism to reduce noise transmission in a large room. We are living in a very noisy world. From the hum of traffic outside your window to the next-door neighbor's blaring TV to sounds from a co-worker's cubicle, unwanted noise remains a resounding problem.

Materials Science - Electroengineering - 06.05.2024
Groundbreaking Microcapacitors Could Power Chips of the Future
In the ongoing quest to make electronic devices ever smaller and more energy efficient, researchers want to bring energy storage directly onto microchips, reducing the losses incurred when power is transported between various device components. To be effective, on-chip energy storage must be able to store a large amount of energy in a very small space and deliver it quickly when needed - requirements that can't be met with existing technologies.

Physics - Electroengineering - 02.05.2024
Physicists arrange atoms in extremely close proximity
Physicists arrange atoms in extremely close proximity
The technique opens possibilities for exploring exotic states of matter and building new quantum materials. Proximity is key for many quantum phenomena, as interactions between atoms are stronger when the particles are close. In many quantum simulators, scientists arrange atoms as close together as possible to explore exotic states of matter and build new quantum materials.

Physics - Electroengineering - 26.04.2024
Scientists capture X-rays from upward positive lightning
Scientists capture X-rays from upward positive lightning
Researchers have for the first time recorded X-rays being produced at the beginning of upward positive lightning flashes; an observation that gives important insight into the origins of this rare - and particularly dangerous - form of lightning. Globally, lightning is responsible for over 4,000 fatalities and billions of dollars in damage every year; Switzerland itself weathers up to 150,000 strikes annually.

Physics - Electroengineering - 15.04.2024
Quantum Precision: A New Kind of Resistor
Quantum Precision: A New Kind of Resistor
Researchers at the University of Würzburg have developed a method that can improve the performance of quantum resistance standards. It's based on a quantum phenomenon called Quantum Anomalous Hall effect. The precise measurement of electrical resistance is essential in industrial production or electronics - for example, in the manufacture of high-tech sensors, microchips and flight controls.

Physics - Electroengineering - 09.04.2024
Resistance-Free Electron Channels
New Technique Lets Scientists Create Resistance-Free Electron Channels " layout="backlink-only" Key Takeaways Scientists have taken the first atomic-resolution images of an exotic quantum phenomenon that could help researchers advance quantum computing and energy-efficient electronics. The work enables the visualization and control of electron flow in a unique class of quantum insulators.

Physics - Electroengineering - 04.04.2024
Progress in Quantum Physics: Researchers Tame Superconductors
Progress in Quantum Physics: Researchers Tame Superconductors
An international team including researchers from the University of Würzburg has succeeded in creating a special state of superconductivity. This discovery could advance the development of quantum computers. Superconductors are materials that can conduct electricity without electrical resistance - making them the ideal base material for electronic components in MRI machines, magnetic levitation trains and even particle accelerators.

Physics - Electroengineering - 04.04.2024
Propelling atomically layered magnets toward green computers
MIT scientists have tackled key obstacles to bringing 2D magnetic materials into practical use, setting the stage for the next generation of energy-efficient computers. Globally, computation is booming at an unprecedented rate, fueled by the boons of artificial intelligence. With this, the staggering energy demand of the world's computing infrastructure has become a major concern, and the development of computing devices that are far more energy-efficient is a leading challenge for the scientific community.

Electroengineering - Health - 04.04.2024
Unlocking new science with devices that control electric power
Unlocking new science with devices that control electric power
Seron Electronics, founded by Mo Mirvakili PhD '17, makes research equipment with applications including microelectronics, clean energy, optics, biomedicine, and beyond. Mo Mirvakili PhD '17 was in the middle of an experiment as a postdoc at MIT when the Covid-19 pandemic hit. Grappling with restricted access to laboratory facilities, he decided to transform his bathroom into a makeshift lab.

Environment - Electroengineering - 26.03.2024
Report reveals what kind of households are the most energy efficient
Smaller and newer homes use less energy than larger, older ones, confirms a new report by UCL researchers that offers unique insights into household energy consumption across the country. The report, published by UCL's Smart Energy Research Lab (SERL), analysed the gas and electricity use of more than 13,000 representative households across Great Britain over two years.

Physics - Electroengineering - 13.03.2024
A new ion trap for larger quantum computers
A new ion trap for larger quantum computers
Researchers at ETH have managed to trap ions using static electric and magnetic fields and to perform quantum operations on them. In the future such traps could be used to realize quantum computers with far more quantum bits than have been possible up to now. The energy states of electrons in an atom follow the laws of quantum mechanics: they are not continuously distributed but restricted to certain well-defined values - this is also called quantisation.

Electroengineering - Physics - 21.02.2024
Freezing electronics to control diamond spin qubits
Freezing electronics to control diamond spin qubits
Researchers from Fujitsu and QuTech have developed new and ultra-cold electronic circuits to control diamond-based quantum bits. As a result of their joint research project, it becomes possible to build larger quantum computers, through overcoming the 'wiring bottleneck', while maintaining high quality performance.