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History / Archeology - Environment - 23.05.2024
A rare find in Timorese mud may rewrite the history of human settlement in Australasia
A rare find in Timorese mud may rewrite the history of human settlement in Australasia
In The Conversation, Dr Ceri Shipton (UCL Institute of Archaeology) explores his new research that has found a large wave of migration reached the island of Timor not long after 50,000 years ago. Humans arrived in Australia at least  65,000 years ago , according to archaeological evidence. These pioneers were part of an early wave of people travelling eastwards from Africa, through Eurasia, and ultimately into Australia and New Guinea.

Environment - 22.05.2024
Researchers propose use of electrical blackouts to determine impact of artificial light on wildlife
Researchers propose use of electrical blackouts to determine impact of artificial light on wildlife
New research proposes the use of electrical blackouts, such as those experienced during loadshedding in South Africa, to enhance our understanding of how artificial light in urban areas may be affecting wildlife behaviours. Artificial light at night, known as ALAN among urban ecologists, has become ubiquitous worldwide, with a notable increase in recent years.

Environment - 22.05.2024
Designing a better nest to help endangered turtles
Designing a better nest to help endangered turtles
With Ontario's eight species of turtles considered at risk, a new nest designed by researchers has the potential to significantly bolster their struggling populations. The habitat is the first designed for turtles in rock barren landscapes, such as the research site around Georgian Bay. It uses moss and lichen.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 22.05.2024
Seaweed forests are an overlooked component of oceanic carbon storage
Seaweed forests are an overlooked component of oceanic carbon storage
A groundbreaking study by an international team of researchers has revealed seaweed forests to be significant contributors to oceanic carbon storage. Their research estimates that the world's seaweed forests transport 56 million tonnes of carbon (between 10 to 170 million tonnes) to deep ocean sinks each year.

Environment - 22.05.2024
Bottled water has more microplastics than tap water
Bottled water has more microplastics than tap water
Members of the Enviroplanet plastics research network, formed by several Spanish research groups specialized in plastic pollution and thanks to an agreement signed by the Autonomous University of Madrid in collaboration with the Organization of Consumers and Users (OCU), have published a study in the journal Scientific Reports on the presence of microplastics in bottled water.

Environment - Life Sciences - 22.05.2024
Australian study proves 'humans are planet's most frightening predator'
Australian study proves ’humans are planet’s most frightening predator’
Australia lacks fearsome large carnivores like lions and wolves, and the relative lack of fear that marsupials like kangaroos and wallabies show to dogs (and other introduced carnivores) has been attributed to a lack of evolutionary experience with large mammalian predators.

Environment - Health - 21.05.2024
Tracking Down Toxic Metals From Tobacco Smoke
Key Takeaways Scientists have detected and measured 28 trace metals in secondhand and thirdhand tobacco smoke. They found that indoor concentrations of cadmium, arsenic, and chromium can exceed California-based health risk guidelines in homes and public places where people smoke. The study suggests that long-term indoor exposure to secondhand and thirdhand smoke may increase respiratory health risks for nonsmokers.

Environment - 21.05.2024
Democratizing Air Quality Data at Nearly No Cost
Due to the high cost of air quality monitors, many countries don't have the tools in place to regularly monitor pollutants. Without routine measurements, policymakers cannot make evidence-based policy decisions to reduce fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) exposure and improve human health.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.05.2024
Warm seawater speeding up melting of 'Doomsday Glacier,' scientists warn
Warm seawater speeding up melting of ’Doomsday Glacier,’ scientists warn
Satellite data provides first evidence of ocean water intrusion beneath Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier  For the first time, there is visible evidence showing that warm seawater is pumping underneath Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier-ominously nicknamed the Doomsday Glacier. An international team of scientists-including a researcher from the University of Waterloo-observed it using satellite imagery and warns that it could accelerate catastrophic sea level rise in 10 to 20 years.

Environment - 20.05.2024
Increasing drought puts the resilience of the Amazon rainforest to the test
Increasing drought puts the resilience of the Amazon rainforest to the test
Since 2015, the Amazon has been slower to recover from increasing drought events, but, overall, the rainforest still shows a remarkable resilience. New international research led by KU Leuven earth and environmental scientists shows that forest degradation due to drought has been most pronounced in the southern Amazon, where human impact is greatest.   Since the turn of the century, four extreme droughts have occurred in the Amazon rainforest.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.05.2024
Preventive locust management: humanitarian crises averted
A new study, published by scientists from CIRAD and INRAE, provides a state-of-the-art assessment of the risk of Desert Locust invasions in West and North Africa, by analyzing 40 years of field data and climate records. The study reveals that preventive management measures have been successful in countering the favorable effects of climate change on outbreaks of the pest.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.05.2024
Regional differences in bird diversity in agroforestry systems
Regional differences in bird diversity in agroforestry systems
International research team investigates benefits of forest proximity for cocoa cultivation   The diversity and ecological functionality of bird communities in tropical agroforestry systems are shaped by the surrounding landscape, in particular the extent and composition of the forest. An international research team led by the University of Göttingen has now investigated the composition and ecological traits of bird communities in 23 cocoa agroforestry systems in Peru.

Environment - 17.05.2024
Tropical forest resilience to seasonal drought linked to nutrient availability
Tropical forest resilience to seasonal drought linked to nutrient availability
International research team carry out Africa's first large-scale nutrient addition experiment with nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium Tropical forests are highly productive ecosystems accounting for nearly half of the global forest carbon sink. If tropical forests can no longer remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, the effects of climate change may become even more severe.

Life Sciences - Environment - 17.05.2024
Earth's earliest sea creatures drove evolution by stirring the water
Earth’s earliest sea creatures drove evolution by stirring the water
3D reconstructions suggest that simple marine animals living over 560 million years ago drove the emergence of more complex life by mixing the seawater around them It's exciting to learn that the very first animals from 580 million years ago had a significant impact on their environment, despite not being able to move or swim.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 17.05.2024
UW atmospheric scientist participating in field campaign to improve Western snowfall, drought forecasts
University of Washington atmospheric scientist Lynn McMurdie has led campaigns to measure rain and snowfall in places ranging from Washington's Olympic Peninsula to Argentina to the Eastern U.S. Now she's among the leaders of a field campaign in Colorado to better understand and forecast snowfall in the mountains of the Western U.S. A scientific expedition this coming winter in Colorado's Yampa Valley will improve forecasts of snowfall and estimates of how climate change will impact snowpack and water availability in mountainous regions of the West.

Chemistry - Environment - 17.05.2024
Sun, sustainability, and silicon: A double dose of Yale solar fuel research
Sun, sustainability, and silicon: A double dose of Yale solar fuel research
Two Yale-led studies indicate the promise of finding hybrid approaches to developing alternative solar fuels. The CHASE is on to develop a new generation of liquid fuels that are activated by sunlight, and Yale researchers are helping to lead the way. Over the past decade, basic research aimed at creating sustainable, solar-powered liquid fuel has reached a crossroads.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 16.05.2024
Healthy Diets for People and the Planet
A study by researchers at the University of Bonn examines the ecological sustainability of children's and young people's diets Our diet puts a strain on planetary resources. Shifting to a sustainable diet that benefits both our health and that of the planet is therefore assuming increasing importance.

Environment - Life Sciences - 16.05.2024
Scientists unlock key to breeding ’carbon gobbling’ plants with a major appetite
The discovery of how a critical enzyme "hidden in nature's blueprint" works by scientists from The Australian National University (ANU) and the University of Newcastle (UoN) could help engineer climate resilient crops capable of sucking far more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere in a much more efficient way.

Environment - Architecture - 15.05.2024
Using AI to improve building energy use and comfort
New study from Waterloo researchers creating climate change-proof buildings with deep learning-powered inspections    University of Waterloo researchers have developed a new method that can lead to significant energy savings in buildings. The team identified 28 major heat loss regions in a multi-unit residential building with the most severe ones being at wall intersections and around windows.

Environment - Innovation - 15.05.2024
Using solar energy to generate heat at high temperatures
Using solar energy to generate heat at high temperatures
Instead of burning coal or oil to produce cement or steel, in the future solar energy could be used for this purpose. Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a thermal trap that can absorb concentrated sunlight and deliver heat at over thousand degrees Celsius. The production of cement, metals and many chemical commodities requires extremely high temperatures of over a thousand degrees Celsius.
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