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Physics - Chemistry - 16.04.2024
Magnetism boosts hydrogen production in model catalysts
Brazilian website Bulgarian website Greek website Indonesian website LatAm website Romanian website Researchers at the University of Twente have shown how to improve the efficiency of hydrogen production in an experimental setup. They showed that the magnetic order of the molecules plays a critical role.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 16.04.2024
A frustrated jet in the centre of the Milky Way
A frustrated jet in the centre of the Milky Way
Magnetic fields spiral around the mass monster Sagittarius A* and form up for a restart The Event Horizon Telescope, a network of individual radio telescopes located all'over the world, has once again observed the centre of our galaxy, the Milky Way. Using the polarised part of the radio light, the researchers discovered strong magnetic fields that spiral out from the edge of the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A*.

Physics - 16.04.2024
Understanding the universe - SHiP experiment promises new insights into the world of elementary particles
Understanding the universe - SHiP experiment promises new insights into the world of elementary particles
Researchers from six German research institutions are making a significant contribution to the development of detectors for a new experiment at CERN, the research centre for particle physics. The European Centre for Nuclear Research CERN close to Geneva has announced plans to conduct a new experiment called SHiP (Search for Hidden Particles) in search for previously unknown elementary particles.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 16.04.2024
Gaia spots a large dormant black hole in our Galaxy
Gaia spots a large dormant black hole in our Galaxy
A high-mass stellar black hole has been discovered in preliminary data from the Gaia satellite by an international team led by astronomers from the University of Geneva. Wading through the inestimable wealth of data from ESA's Gaia mission, a team of scientists, including astronomers from the University of Geneva , uncovered a ''sleeping'' giant.

Environment - Life Sciences - 16.04.2024
The response capacity of marine phytoplankton species to global warming confirmed
Mara Segovia, Erasmus+ researcher at the Cavanilles Institute of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology (ICBiBe) of the University of Valencia, has participated in a study that reveals the response capacity of seaweed to the effects of climate change. Over the last 60 years, diatoms - the subject of this study - have increased their optimal temperature by 1°C to adapt to global warming.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 16.04.2024
Seed ferns: plants experimented with complex leaf vein networks 201 million years ago
Seed ferns: plants experimented with complex leaf vein networks 201 million years ago
Flowering plant-type leaf veins died out and re-evolved several times in the course of the Earth's history According to a research team led by palaeontologists from the University of Vienna, the net-like leaf veining typical for today's flowering plants developed much earlier than previously thought, but died out again several times.

Environment - Economics - 16.04.2024
For more sustainable palm oil production
For more sustainable palm oil production
Research team outlines ways to make oil palm cultivation more ecologically and economically sustainable Palm oil is a widely used ingredient in many foods and cosmetics. The boom in oil palm cultivation in Indonesia in recent decades has improved the living conditions of many farmers, but has led to a loss of biodiversity and the large-scale destruction of rainforests.

Astronomy / Space - Earth Sciences - 16.04.2024
New analysis reveals brutal history of Winchcombe meteorite's space journey
New analysis reveals brutal history of Winchcombe meteorite’s space journey
Intensive new nano-analysis of the Winchcombe meteorite has revealed how it was affected by water and repeatedly smashed apart and reassembled on the journey it took through space before landing in an English sheep field in 2021. Researchers from dozens of institutions in the UK, Europe, Australia, and the USA collaborated on the research.

Life Sciences - 16.04.2024
Twisted pollen tubes induce infertility
Twisted pollen tubes induce infertility
Plants with multiple sets of chromosomes have advantages over their relatives with a double set. But why they often start out infertile was only partially understood. Biologists at ETH Zurich have now discovered a new reason for the initial difficulties. Most mammals and humans have a double set of chromosomes - and as a rule, plants do, too: one set comes from the father, the other from the mother.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 15.04.2024
An enzyme makes mushrooms 'magical'
An enzyme makes mushrooms ’magical’
An international research team has investigated the biosynthesis of psilocybin, the main ingredient of hallucinogenic mushrooms. They gained new insights into the structure and reaction mechanism of the enzyme PsiM. It plays a key role in the production of psilocybin. The results of the study were published in the journal "Nature Communications".

Environment - Life Sciences - 15.04.2024
Bumblebees don't care about pesticide cocktails
Bumblebees don’t care about pesticide cocktails
In their natural environment, wild bees are exposed to various pesticides that can have a potentially toxic effect. A study by the University of Würzburg has now shown that bumblebees are relatively resistant to these products. Bumblebees appear to be quite resistant to common pesticides. This is shown by a new study, the results of which have now been published by scientists from Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg (JMU) in the journal Environment International .

Health - Pharmacology - 15.04.2024
Canada likely to miss WHO’s Hepatitis C elimination target
Canada likely to miss WHO's Hepatitis C elimination target, research shows. Canada will not reach the original World Health Organization's (WHO) target of eliminating the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) by 2030 and lags in comparison to other developed countries, a new study led by researchers at the University of Waterloo has found.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 15.04.2024
Arabica coffee: New database to better identify more climate-resilient plants
Arabica coffee: New database to better identify more climate-resilient plants
As climate change threatens coffee farming, experts at Nestlé, the world's largest food company, are exploring how advanced data science and artificial intelligence can help select and breed more climate-resilient crops. Together with researchers from scientific institutions in Brazil, France, the US and elsewhere, they have published their latest findings in the journal Nature Genetics.

Life Sciences - Environment - 15.04.2024
How blue-green algae manipulate microorganisms
How blue-green algae manipulate microorganisms
Research team at the University of Freiburg discovers previously unknown gene that indirectly promotes photosynthesis Cyanobacteria - also called blue-green algae - are known as the "plants of the ocean" because they carry out photosynthesis on a gigantic scale, produce oxygen and extract the greenhouse gas CO2 from the environment.

Computer Science - 15.04.2024
Security Vulnerability in Browser Interface Allows Computer Access via Graphics Card
Security Vulnerability in Browser Interface Allows Computer Access via Graphics Card
Researchers at TU Graz were successful with three different side-channel attacks on graphics cards via the WebGPU browser interface. The attacks were fast enough to succeed during normal surfing behaviour. Modern websites place ever greater demands on the computing power of computers. For this reason, web browsers have also had access to the computing capacities of the graphics card (Graphics Processing Unit or GPU) in addition to the CPU of a computer for a number of years.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.04.2024
Advance in immune cell screening uncovers receptors that target prostate cancer
Advance in immune cell screening uncovers receptors that target prostate cancer
FINDINGS A recent UCLA study demonstrates a new process for screening T cells, part of the body's natural defenses, for characteristics vital to the success of cell-based treatments. The method filters T cells based on the receptor proteins found on their surface - which enable them to latch onto certain threats - and the type and amount of cell-killing or immune response-triggering molecules that they secrete.

Astronomy / Space - 15.04.2024
How Pluto got its heart
How Pluto got its heart
The mystery of how Pluto got a giant heart-shaped feature on its surface has finally been solved by an international team of astrophysicists led by the University of Bern. The team is the first to successfully reproduce the unusual shape with numerical simulations, attributing it to a giant and slow oblique-angle impact.

Physics - Electroengineering - 15.04.2024
Quantum Precision: A New Kind of Resistor
Quantum Precision: A New Kind of Resistor
Researchers at the University of Würzburg have developed a method that can improve the performance of quantum resistance standards. It's based on a quantum phenomenon called Quantum Anomalous Hall effect. The precise measurement of electrical resistance is essential in industrial production or electronics - for example, in the manufacture of high-tech sensors, microchips and flight controls.

Life Sciences - Environment - 15.04.2024
How blue-green algae manipulate microorganisms
How blue-green algae manipulate microorganisms
Research team at the University of Freiburg discovers a previously unknown gene that indirectly promotes photosynthesis Cyanobacteria are also known as blue-green algae and are considered the "plants of the ocean" because they photosynthesize on a gigantic scale, produce oxygen and extract the greenhouse gas CO2 from the environment.

Environment - 15.04.2024
Tropical forests can't recover naturally without fruit eating birds
Tropical forests can’t recover naturally without fruit eating birds
Natural forest regeneration is hailed as a cost-effective way to restore biodiversity and sequester carbon. However, the fragmentation of tropical forests has restricted the movement of large birds limiting their capacity to disperse seeds and restore healthy forests. New research from the Crowther Lab at ETH Zurich illustrates a critical barrier to natural regeneration of tropical forests.
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