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History / Archeology - 22.07.2024
New discovery adds to story of ancient human migration 
New discovery adds to story of ancient human migration 
New evidence of human occupation in southeast Indonesia dating back 42,000 years offers fresh clues about the route taken by some of the first humans to arrive in our region, according to a study from The Australian National University (ANU).

History / Archeology - Environment - 16.07.2024
Water scarcity drove steam power adoption during Industrial Revolution
Water scarcity drove steam power adoption during Industrial Revolution, new research suggests A groundbreaking new reconstruction of 19th-century Britain's water resources has revealed how limited access to waterpower during the Industrial Revolution helped drive the adoption of steam engines in Greater Manchester's Cottonopolis.

History / Archeology - Materials Science - 10.07.2024
Prehistoric craftsmen created fake amber beads
Prehistoric craftsmen created fake amber beads
A US research team unveils this practice, which was intended to meet the demand in places where amber was scarce. A study by the QUANTAS research group of the University of Seville has revealed that prehistoric communities in Spain and Portugal developed the first known composite to simulate amber, reflecting the development of complex technical systems by these Neolithic artisans in regions where amber was scarce.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 10.07.2024
Ancient DNA study sheds new light on dingo ancestry
Ancient DNA study sheds new light on dingo ancestry
Analysis of ancient dingo DNA shows the genetic diversity of modern-day dingo populations was in place long before domestic dogs were introduced into Australia by European colonists, according to a new study involving researchers from The Australian National University (ANU). The study, co-led by Queensland University of Technology (QUT) and the University of Adelaide, suggest there is less interbreeding between dingoes and modern dogs than previously thought, with the new study confirming modern-day dingoes retain much of their ancestral genetic diversity.

History / Archeology - Research Management - 02.07.2024
Exceptional excavation season in Antikythera
A team of Swiss and Greek archaeologists has completed the fourth season of excavations on the wreck of Antikythera, uncovering part of the ship's hull. The 2024 expedition to the Antikythera wreck, carried out from 17 May to 20 June 2024, has led to a breakthrough in the 2021-2025 research program orchestrated by the Swiss School of Archaeology in Greece (ESAG) and supervised by the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports.

History / Archeology - Agronomy / Food Science - 28.06.2024
Oldest skull and skull fragment in Flanders
Oldest skull and skull fragment in Flanders
During the Contact Day Archaeology of the Province of East Flanders on Friday 28 June, it was announced that the oldest skull and skull fragment of Flanders have been discovered in Ename. A new exhibition on heritage care and the heritage of Ename will open at the provincial Heritage Site Ename on 6 July.

Astronomy / Space - History / Archeology - 27.06.2024
Gravitational wave researchers cast new light on Antikythera mechanism mystery
Techniques developed to analyse the ripples in spacetime detected by one of the 21st century's most sensitive pieces of scientific equipment have helped cast new light on the function of the oldest known analogue computer. Astronomers from the University of Glasgow have used statistical modelling techniques developed to analyse gravitational waves to establish the likely number of holes in one of the broken rings of the Antikythera mechanism - an ancient artifact which was showcased in the movie Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny .

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 26.06.2024
For the first time that Neanderthals cared for and protected children with Down syndrome
Study demonstrates for the first time that Neanderthals cared for and protected children with Down syndrome Original temporal bone and 3D reconstruction of the CN-46700 fossil from Cova Negra in anterior view. Researchers from the University of Valencia, the University of Alcalá and the Chair of Evolutionary Otoacoustics and Paleoanthropology at HM Hospitals have discovered the first case of Down syndrome among Neanderthals.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 25.06.2024
Merovingian burial ground in Koksijde reveals who inhabited Flanders in the seventh century
KU Leuven geneticists discover two separate population groups that coexisted in early medieval Flanders The early medieval period in Flanders is a period that is not very well-known, because of the limited historical and archaeological sources. A unique discovery from the seventh century in Koksijde allowed KU Leuven geneticists to use DNA research to reveal the ancestry of the people who inhabited Flanders during this time.

History / Archeology - Religions - 25.06.2024
Sensational find: 1,500-year-old reliquary discovered during excavations
Sensational find: 1,500-year-old reliquary discovered during excavations
Since the summer of 2016, archaeologists from Innsbruck have been carrying out excavations in a late antique hilltop settlement in the municipality of Irschen in southern Austria. Two years ago, they made a sensational discovery: a Christian reliquary was still hidden in a previously unknown church.

History / Archeology - 13.06.2024
6,000 years ago, men and women had equal access to resources
6,000 years ago, men and women had equal access to resources
A team from the University of Geneva shows that all the people who lived and were buried in Barmaz necropolises (Switzerland) during the Neolithic period had the same access to food resources. Using isotope geochemistry, a team from the University of Geneva has uncovered new information about the Barmaz necropolis in Valais (Switzerland): 14% of the people buried 6,000 years ago at this site were not locals.

Health - History / Archeology - 12.06.2024
Origin and spread of malaria
Origin and spread of malaria
Scientists reconstruct ancient genomes of the two most deadly malaria parasites, Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum In a new study, an international team of researchers led by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, reconstructed the evolutionary history and global spread of malaria over the past 5,500 years, identifying trade , warfare, and colonialism as major catalysts for its dispersal.

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 12.06.2024
Ritual sacrifice at Chichén Itzá
Ritual sacrifice at Chichén Itzá
Ancient Maya genomes reveal the practice of male twin sacrifice and the enduring genetic legacy of colonial-era epidemics Rising to power in the wake of the Classic Maya collapse, Chichén Itzá was among the largest and most influential cities of the ancient Maya, but much about its political connections and ritual life remain poorly understood.

History / Archeology - 05.06.2024
Blood sausages and yak milk: Bronze Age cuisine of Mongolian nomads unveiled
Blood sausages and yak milk: Bronze Age cuisine of Mongolian nomads unveiled
Bronze cauldrons were used by the inhabitants of the Mongolian steppe around 2,700 years ago to process animal blood and milk. This is shown by a protein analysis of archaeological finds from this period. Scattered across the Eurasian steppe, archaeologists repeatedly come across metal cauldrons from the Bronze Age during excavations.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 05.06.2024
Revolutionary method for establishing time between Neanderthal fires
New study develops revolutionary method for establishing time between Neanderthal fires Santiago Sossa-Ríos, from the Universitat de València, excavating a hearth at El Salt. Photo: Sven Kleinhapl. The interdisciplinary team of researchers from the Universitat de València, the University of Burgos, the University of La Laguna, the University of Alacant, the Complutense University of Madrid and the Institute of Geosciences has succeeded in determining, with high precision, the time between different Neanderthal fires at the El Salt site (Alcoi, Alicante).

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 05.06.2024
Revolutionary method to establish the time between Neanderthal fires
A study develops a revolutionary method to establish the time between Neanderthal fires Santiago Sossa-Ríos, from the Universitat de València, excavating a hearth at El Salt. Photo: Sven Kleinhapl. The interdisciplinary research team from the Universitat de València, the University of Burgos, the University of La Laguna, the University of Alacant, the Complutense University of Madrid and the Institute of Geosciences has succeeded in determining with high precision the time between different Neanderthal fires at El Salt site (Alcoi, Alicante).

History / Archeology - 04.06.2024
Largest known prehistoric rock engravings discovered in South America
Largest known prehistoric rock engravings discovered in South America
A series of ancient South American engravings are thought to be the largest prehistoric rock art in the world, reveals a new study by an international team of archaeologists involving UCL researchers. The team co-led by researchers at Bournemouth University and Universidad de los Andes in Colombia published their results in the journal Antiquity .

History / Archeology - Religions - 04.06.2024
Earliest manuscript of Gospel about Jesus's childhood discovered
Earliest manuscript of Gospel about Jesus’s childhood discovered
Papyrologists decipher manuscript fragment and date it to the 4th to 5th century. For decades, a papyrus fragment with the inventory number P.Hamb.Graec. 1011 remained unnoticed at the Hamburg Carl von Ossietzky State and University Library. Now papyrologists Dr Lajos Berkes from the Institute for Christianity and Antiquity at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (HU), and Prof Gabriel Nocchi Macedo from the University of Liège, Belgium, have identified the fragment as the earliest surviving copy of the Infancy Gospel of Thomas .

History / Archeology - 03.06.2024
Medieval game collection unearthed
Medieval game collection unearthed
A team of archaeologists discovers an almost 1.000-year-old games collection including a well-preserved chessman, gaming pieces and dice. Laboratory analyses show that one party played with red. The laboratory results also allow conclusions to be drawn about the astonishing continuity of the rules of the game.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 03.06.2024
Kinship and ancestry of the Celts in Baden-Württemberg
Kinship and ancestry of the Celts in Baden-Württemberg
Genetic analyses of Celtic burial mounds from 500 BCE reveal close relationships and provide new insights into the power structures of early Celtic elites The Celtic culture of the pre-Roman Iron Age in Western and Central Europe has left numerous traces to this day, not least in the form of enormous burial mounds and spectacular archaeological artifacts.
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