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Innovation/Technology - Administration/Government
16.11.2017
Female Tech Entrepreneurs Hampered by Bias Among Male Investors, Study Finds
Female Tech Entrepreneurs Hampered by Bias Among Male Investors, Study Finds
The study's authors analyzed data for nearly 18,000 companies and found that female-founded start-ups have a harder time gaining investor interest and raising money. A new study is highlighting one possible reason women aren't making more headway in Silicon Valley: men prefer to invest in companies run by other men.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
14.11.2017
Trials bring hope for world-first rheumatoid arthritis treatment
Trials bring hope for world-first rheumatoid arthritis treatment
Human trials of an innovative treatment for rheumatoid arthritis developed by The University of Queensland have begun in Brisbane. DEN-181, a vaccine-style treatment referred to as an 'immunotherapy', targets the underlying cause of the disease rather than treating its inflammatory symptoms. Patient trials at a clinical research facility at the Princess Alexandra Hospital began last week.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
13.11.2017
Less blood can be used in heart operations
A major international study involving Australian cardiac patients has found surgeons can safely use significantly less blood than they traditionally have been in heart operations. Researchers - including Royal Melbourne Hospital heart surgeon and University of Melbourne deputy director of surgery Professor Alistair Royse - believe they can safely save the equivalent of one blood donation per moderate-to-high risk patient.
Administration/Government
12.11.2017
Heart’s pumping function is not an indicator of heart failure survival rates
FINDINGS Contrary to popular practice, a measure of the heart's pumping function known as “left ventricular ejection fraction” is not associated with the long-term outcomes of hospitalized heart failure patients, a UCLA-led study of Medicare patients has found. Hospitalized heart failure patients in all age groups within the study and with all levels of ejection fraction had significantly lower rates of survival after five years and a higher risk of re-hospitalization than people in the United States without heart failure.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Administration/Government
25.10.2017
How 14 Billion Dollars Protected Earth’s Species
Billions of dollars of financial investment in global conservation has significantly reduced biodiversity loss, according to a new Oxford University research. Image credit: Shutterstock Billions of dollars of financial investment in global conservation has significantly reduced biodiversity loss, according to a new Oxford University research.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
11.10.2017
Active travel could lower rates of disease
State and local government targets to get people out of cars and into more active transport would reduce heart disease and diabetes by tens of thousands of cases. University of Queensland researchers have evaluated Brisbane's active travel targets for 2026, which aim to achieve a split of 15 per cent for walking, five per cent for cycling and 14 per cent for public transport.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
09.10.2017
Quality improvement closing the gap, saving money in indigenous health
The use of continuous quality improvement activities raises the quality and quantity of preventive healthcare delivered to Indigenous Australians, University of Sydney research reveals. The finding published in today's BMJ Open is critical for closing the gap in health between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians says Professor Ross Bailie of the University of Sydney , who led the research.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
05.10.2017
Nanopatch polio vaccine delivers
Nanopatch polio vaccine delivers
Efforts to rid the world of polio have taken another significant step, thanks to research led by University of Queensland bioscience experts and funding from the World Health Organisation (WHO). A fresh study of the Nanopatch - a microscopic vaccine delivery platform first developed by UQ researchers - has shown the device more effectively combats poliovirus than needles and syringes.
Social Sciences - Administration/Government
03.10.2017
Minor parole violations behind high rate of reincarceration
ANN ARBOR-People convicted of felonies are more likely to return to prison if they are sentenced to prison rather than probation, according to a University of Michigan study. The study adds new evidence to the argument that a key driver of high incarceration rates is the readmission to prison of individuals recently released from prison, a phenomenon that has been called prison's "revolving door." It also shows that this self-perpetuating cycle of prison admissions is being driven largely by readmissions to prison for technical violations of parole rather than new crimes.
Administration/Government - Medicine/Pharmacology
27.09.2017
No evidence to support claims that telephone consultations reduce GP workload or hospital referrals
No evidence to support claims that telephone consultations reduce GP workload or hospital referrals
Telephone consultations to determine whether a patient needs to see their GP face-to-face can deal with many problems, but a study led by researchers at the Cambridge Centre for Health Services Research (University of Cambridge and RAND Europe), found no evidence to support claims by companies offering to manage these services or by NHS England that the approach saves money or reduces the number of hospital referrals.
Earth Sciences - Administration/Government
21.09.2017
Study suggests tectonic plates began moving half a billion years earlier than thought
While previous studies had argued that Earth's crust 3.5 billion years ago looked like these Hawaiian lavas, a new study led by UChicago scientists suggests by then much of it had already been transformed into lighter-colored felsic rock by plate tectonics. The Earth's history is written in its elements, but as the tectonic plates slip and slide over and under each other over time, they muddy that evidence-and with it the secrets of why Earth can sustain life.
Astronomy - Administration/Government
12.09.2017
Astronomers spun up by galaxy-shape finding
Scientists have measured how a galaxy's spin affects its shape - and found faster-spinning galaxies are flatter and rounder. The discovery was made sampling 845 galaxies and could help provide insights into a galaxy's past. For the first time astronomers have measured how a galaxy's spin affects its shape.
Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics - Administration/Government
11.09.2017
Stick, peel, or bounce: Controlling a freezing droplet's fate
Stick, peel, or bounce: Controlling a freezing droplet’s fate
When freezing droplets impact a surface, they generally either stick to it or bounce away. Controlling this response is crucial to many applications, including 3-D printing, the spraying of some surface coatings, and the prevention of ice formation on structures such as airplane wings, wind turbines, or power lines.
Administration/Government - Life Sciences
08.09.2017
NSERC awards over $35M to McGill scientists and engineers
All the tools and technology in the world are nothing without the talent to use them to their full potential. Thanks to a huge investment from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council's (NSERC) Discovery Grants Program, McGill can engage its enormous research capacity in long term, fundamental science and engineering programs.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Administration/Government
06.09.2017
Biodiversity proves its real-world value
Biodiversity proves its real-world value
ANN ARBOR-Hundreds of experiments have suggested that biodiversity fosters healthier, more productive ecosystems. But many experts doubted that results from small-scale experiments would hold up in real-world ecosystems where nature is most unpredictable and complex. A Smithsonian Institution and University of Michigan study scheduled for publication Sept.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
01.09.2017
Brief primary care intervention cut risky drug use among Latinos by 40 percent
Brief primary care intervention cut risky drug use among Latinos by 40 percent
FINDINGS New research finds that brief interventions in a primary care clinic can reduce patients' risky substance use by 4.5 days per month — a 40 percent decline among the Latino patients surveyed — compared with people who did not receive the brief intervention. This corresponds to two fewer weekends of drug use per month, or one less day of use per weekend, or a shorter monthly binge period.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
23.08.2017
New scan developed to predict stroke risk
Researchers at the University of Oxford have developed a new type of MRI scan to predict the risk of having a stroke, thanks to funding from the British Heart Foundation (BHF). The non-invasive technique, described in a paper published in the journal JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging , produces a quantitative result that can accurately indicate whether plaques in the carotid arteries - those that supply the brain with blood - are rich in cholesterol, and therefore more likely to cause a stroke.
Administration/Government
10.08.2017
Evidence that Uber, Lyft reduce car ownership
ANN ARBOR-In areas where Uber, Lyft and other on-demand ride services operate, consumers may buy fewer cars and even take fewer trips, according to a new study. The findings are among the first to quantify how the uptick in transportation networking companies might be affecting consumer behavior. Researchers at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, Texas A&M Transportation Institute and Columbia University surveyed mor
Administration/Government
09.08.2017
State crime researchers uncover role of Western companies in Uzbek corruption scandal
State crime researchers uncover role of Western companies in Uzbek corruption scandal
Evidence in a new research report published today shows that the government of Uzbekistan acted as an organised crime network, with state agencies conducting racketeering activity that benefited political heiress Gulnara Karimova, the elder daughter of Islam Karimov, the leader of Uzbekistan from 1989 to his death in 2016.
Administration/Government - Medicine/Pharmacology
31.07.2017
Costs associated with homelessness are high, suggesting need for shift to programs to end homelessness
Support services for homeless people with mental illness in Canada's biggest cities cost more than $55K a year per person on average, study finds Health, social and judicial services for homeless people with mental illness cost society more than $55,000 per person per year, on average, in Canada's three largest cities - a finding that suggests funds could be more effectively allocated to preventing and curtailing homelessness, according to McGill University health economist Eric Latimer.
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