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Business / Economics - 04.12.2018
Increasing Crop Insurances Adoption in Developing Countries
Increasing Crop Insurances Adoption in Developing Countries
Farmers in developing countries often rely heavily on their yearly harvest to feed their families. A bad crop can have severe consequences for their livelihood. Despite the significant advantages crop insurances would offer in alleviating this risk, only a small percentage of farmers insure their crops.

Business / Economics - 28.11.2018
Innate fingerprint could detect tampered steel parts
Innate fingerprint could detect tampered steel parts
Treaty compliance aided by spotting illicit artillery exchange and duplication David Mascarenas, a research and development engineer at Los Alamos National Laboratory, used Barkhausen noise to find unique-looking "fingerprints" in steel that could help to verify weapons treaties and reduce the use of counterfeit bolts in the construction industry.

Business / Economics - 15.11.2018
Border wall came with high cost and low benefit for U.S. workers
Researchers at Stanford and Dartmouth find the Secure Fence Act of 2006, which built a partial wall across the U.S.-Mexico border, had a negative economic impact on U.S. citizens. Facebook Twitter Email From 2007 to 2010, the United States built an additional 548 miles of fencing across the U.S.-Mexico border.

Business / Economics - 08.11.2018
Online labour platforms offer growing alternative to traditional offshoring
Online labour platforms that connect freelance workers and clients around the world are emerging as an alternative to traditional offshoring, according to new Oxford University research. Workers from emerging economies in particular are benefitting from these networks according to the study conducted by researchers at the Oxford Internet Institute.

Physics - Business / Economics - 07.11.2018
Depth of Vision
HORIBA Scientific has developed for QuantIC, the UK Quantum Technology Hub in Quantum Enhanced Imaging, Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting (TCSPC), electronics to support its research into real-time computational 3D imaging and Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR). This research has the potential to result in faster, better quality and lower-cost 3D imaging for applications that include autonomous vehicles, machine learning, security and surveying.

Health - Business / Economics - 31.10.2018
HIV Ontrafelen Fund supports groundbreaking HIV research
( 31-10-2018 ) To the search for an effective remedy to combat HIV, the HIV Cure Research Center at UZ Ghent has made groundbreaking contributions. The HIV Ontrafelen Fund represents an indispensable link to enable this research work to continue. As a progressive and pluralistic institution, Ghent University is committed to contributing via research to the exploration of solutions to social and economic problems.

Business / Economics - 29.10.2018
Codifying impacts of cyber attack
Cyber-security researchers have   identified a total of at least 57 different ways in which cyber-attacks can have a negative impact on individuals, businesses and even nations, ranging from threats to life, causing depression, regulatory fines or disrupting daily activities. Researchers, from the  Department of Computer Science  at the University of Oxford and Kent's  School of Computing  set out to define and codify the different ways in which the various cyber-incidents being witnessed today can have   negative outcomes.

Business / Economics - 25.10.2018
Children and young people could be under the influence of TV alcohol advertising
TV advertising could be responsible for encouraging young people to drink alcohol, a study led by The University of Nottingham has revealed. The research, published in the Journal of Public Health and involving researchers from the University of Bath, showed that alcohol imagery on UK television is extremely common, appearing in more than half of all programmes and almost half of all advertising breaks between programmes.

Administration - Business / Economics - 08.10.2018
Austerity cuts 'twice as deep' in England as rest of Britain
Austerity cuts ’twice as deep’ in England as rest of Britain
Research finds significant inequalities in cuts to council services across the country, with deprived areas in the north of England and London seeing the biggest drops in local authority spending since 2010. Public finance is politics hidden in accounting columns Mia Gray A "fine-grained" analysis of local authority budgets across Britain since 2010 has found that the average reduction in service spending by councils was almost 24% in England compared to just 12% in Wales and 11.5% in Scotland.

Administration - Business / Economics - 08.10.2018
Austerity cuts 'twice as deep' in England than rest of Britain
Austerity cuts ’twice as deep’ in England than rest of Britain
Latest research finds significant inequalities in cuts to council services across the country, with deprived areas in the north of England and London seeing the biggest drops in local authority spending since 2010. The government needs to decide whether it is content for more local authorities to essentially go bust Mia Gray The first "fine-grained" analysis of local authority budgets across Britain since 2010 has found that the average reduction in service spending by councils was almost 24% in England compared to just 12% in Wales and 11.5% in Scotland.

Business / Economics - 01.10.2018
Pressure to publish in top journals stifles creativity in economic research
Too often in economics, where you publish can be more important than what you publish. That's the theory explored in a new study co-authored by Nobel-winning economist James J. Heckman and Sidharth Moktan, a predoctoral fellow at the Center for the Economics of Human Development. The University of Chicago scholars found that tenure and prize committees often base decisions on how often candidates publish in "top five" journals in the field.

Life Sciences - Business / Economics - 01.10.2018
Scientists Uncover Why You Can't Decide What to Order for Lunch
Scientists Uncover Why You Can’t Decide What to Order for Lunch
If you've ever found yourself staring at a lengthy restaurant menu and been completely unable to decide what to order for lunch, you have experienced what psychologists call choice overload. The brain, faced with an overwhelming number of similar options, struggles to make a decision. A study conducted in California nearly 20 years ago is illustrative of the effect.

Business / Economics - 25.09.2018
Retirees out of pocket under proposed tax imputation policy
Retirees out of pocket under proposed tax imputation policy
Economic modelling from ANU has found the Australian Labor Party's proposal to end cash refunds for excess imputation credits will result in a significant hit to the hip pocket of retirees, and that the effect would be similar to reducing the average superannuation fund balance at the point of retirement by up to nine per cent.

Business / Economics - 24.09.2018
Expanding CEO-to-worker pay gap bad for business
Expanding CEO-to-worker pay gap bad for business
Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window) Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window) Click to print (Opens in new window) Companies whose CEOs earn hundreds of times their average employee's pay are viewed as less desirable to work for, and to do business with, according to a new UC Berkeley study.

Environment - Business / Economics - 24.09.2018
New Research Forecasts U.S. Among Top Nations to Suffer Economic Damage from Climate Change
For the first time, researchers have developed a data set quantifying what the social cost of carbon—the measure of the economic harm from carbon dioxide emissions—will be for the globe's nearly 200 countries, and the results are surprising. Although much previous research has focused on how rich countries benefit from the fossil fuel economy, while damages accrue primarily to the developing world, the top three counties with the most to lose from climate change are the United States, India and Saudi Arabia—three major world powers.

Computer Science / Telecom - Business / Economics - 20.09.2018
Reducing false positives in credit card fraud detection
Reducing false positives in credit card fraud detection
Model extracts granular behavioral patterns from transaction data to more accurately flag suspicious activity. Have you ever used your credit card at a new store or location only to have it declined? Has a sale ever been blocked because you charged a higher amount than usual? Consumers' credit cards are declined surprisingly often in legitimate transactions.

Business / Economics - 14.09.2018
How uncertain rewards spur repeat purchases
Marketers everywhere are looking for what will entice consumers to make a purchase-not just once but repeatedly-and new research points to a rather surprising result. While conventional wisdom says that people don't like uncertain gains or rewards, a study from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business finds that uncertainty can play an important role in motivating repeat behaviors.

Psychology - Business / Economics - 13.09.2018
Emotionally stable people spend more on Christmas
Emotionally stable people spend more on Christmas
People who are more emotionally stable spend more during the Christmas season, while those who are high in neuroticism spend less, according to new research by UCL and Northwestern University. Those with more artistic interests, more active imaginations and who are more open minded spend less, whereas those who are more conscientious, plan ahead and are organised spend more in the lead-up to Christmas.

Business / Economics - History / Archeology - 12.09.2018
Works of Art Called "Degenerate Art" from Collections of Art Dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt Were Catalogued
Published in Scholarly Database at Freie Universität Berlin No 236/2018 from Sep 12, 2018 The works acquired by the art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt during the period of National Socialism in Germany that were officially ostracized as "degenerate art" have been fully catalogued in a database.

Psychology - Business / Economics - 12.09.2018
Emotionally stable people spend more at Christmas
Emotionally stable people spend more at Christmas
People who are more emotionally stable spend more during the Christmas season, while those who are high in neuroticism spend less, according to new research by UCL and Northwestern University. Those with more artistic interests, more active imaginations and who are more open minded spend less, whereas those who are more conscientious, plan ahead and are organised spend more in the lead-up to Christmas.
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