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Health - Campus - 19.04.2022
Wearables can track COVID symptoms, other diseases
If you become ill with COVID-19, your smartwatch can track the progression of your symptoms, and could even show how sick you become. That's according to a University of Michigan study that examined the effects of COVID-19 with six factors derived from heart rate data. The same method could be used to detect other diseases such as influenza, and the researchers say the approach could be used to track disease at home or when medical resources are scarce, such as during a pandemic or in developing countries.

Campus - 30.03.2022
Exoskeletons with personalize-your-own settings
Exoskeletons with personalize-your-own settings
Users who could adjust the timing, torque of an ankle exoskeleton typically found comfortable settings in under two minutes To transform human mobility, exoskeletons need to interact seamlessly with their user, providing the right level of assistance at the right time to cooperate with our muscles as we move.

Astronomy / Space - Campus - 29.03.2022
Source of super-fast electron rain
Source of super-fast electron rain
The downpours, which can affect satellites and space travel, are caused by electromagnetic whistler waves, scientists say The downpours, which can affect satellites and space travel, are caused by electromagnetic whistler waves, scientists say UCLA scientists have discovered a new energetic electrons raining down on Earth , a phenomenon that contributes to the colorful aurora borealis but also poses hazards to satellites, spacecraft and astronauts.

Campus - Social Sciences - 21.03.2022
Increasing harassment of researchers subject of new report
Increasing harassment of researchers subject of new report
A Canadian task force made up of university-based researchers, including at Western, is tackling the growing number of online threats and harassments researchers face and has called on the federal government to initiate a nationwide, coordinated approach to addressing the issue. "The problem has always been there, but the tools have changed," said Howard Ramos, chair of the department of sociology, and co-author of a Royal Society of Canada briefing, " Protecting Expert Advice for the Public: Promoting Safety and Improved Communications.

Astronomy / Space - Campus - 10.03.2022
New, improved Dragonfly telescope is a galactic gas detector
New, improved Dragonfly telescope is a galactic gas detector
The Dragonfly telescope is undergoing a metamorphosis. For the past decade, the Dragonfly Telephoto Array - designed by Yale's Pieter van Dokkum and the University of Toronto's Roberto Abraham and located in New Mexico - has conducted groundbreaking science by detecting faint starlight within dimly lit parts of the night sky.

Astronomy / Space - Campus - 10.03.2022
The new, improved Dragonfly is a galactic gas detector
The new, improved Dragonfly is a galactic gas detector
The Dragonfly telescope is undergoing a metamorphosis. For the past decade, the Dragonfly Telephoto Array - designed by Yale's Pieter van Dokkum and the University of Toronto's Roberto Abraham and located in New Mexico - has conducted groundbreaking science by detecting faint starlight within dimly lit parts of the night sky.

Campus - Economics - 02.03.2022
Cause for Optimism
Pilot program explores possibilities of low-cost, online support to address COVID-19 learning disruptions A recent pilot program measuring the results of online tutoring for K-12 students has shown positive, promising results, according to a new study from the University of California San Diego's Rady School of Management.

Environment - Campus - 21.02.2022
Government Guidelines Across North America, Europe Fail to Protect Lakes from Salt Pollution
UC San Diego ecologists contribute to a coordinated international scientific experiment The salinity of freshwater ecosystems caused by road de-icing salts, agriculture fertilizers, mining operations and climate change is increasing worldwide and current water quality guidelines don't do enough to address the issue, an international study co-authored by University of California San Diego scientists and led by The University of Toledo and Queen's University in Kingston has found.

Campus - Linguistics / Literature - 14.02.2022
Virgil has the edge on Shakespeare in helping students to love literature
Virgil has the edge on Shakespeare in helping students to love literature
Students who study Virgil's Aeneid at school find it significantly more engaging than other 'high-prestige' literature, even though they only learn tiny fragments of the text, research suggests. Ultimately, if this is high-level poetry that students actually like, perhaps we ought to be finding ways to give them the chance to do it Frances Foster The finding comes from a limited study with three groups of 15 and 16-year-old state school students taking Latin GCSE, and raises the possibility that there may be a case for expanding ancient literature's use in the wider curriculum.

Psychology - Campus - 13.02.2022
Understanding how your romantic partner sees your emotions may help couples cope with conflict
Beliefs about how we are seen by our romantic partners may affect the quality of our relationships, McGill Psychology study finds A study by researchers at McGill University is shedding new light on the importance of the perception of emotion in romantic relationships. The all-McGill team found that, regardless of how an individual is truly feeling, knowing their partner sees their emotions as a typical reaction to a given situation may lead to better relations within a couple - especially in situations of conflict.

Life Sciences - Campus - 28.01.2022
A Map for the Sense of Smell
Evolution has structured flies with an energy-efficient olfactory system The distinctive smell of a flower.. the unmistakable aroma of coffee.. the dangers linked with inhaling smoke fumes. Sensory systems have evolved to provide us with immediate, finely tuned information about the world around us, whether they are color processed through our visual system or certain pitches interpreted through our hearing.

Campus - 26.01.2022
Blockchain as proof of identity
Community Land Trust Brussels wins World Habitat Award VUB experts study and guide global development of community land trusts for affordable housing Wednesday, January 26, 2022 VUB in the media A se

Campus - 19.01.2022
More time for research - teachers say it's about time
More time for research - teachers say it’s about time
The Monash Q Project surveyed 1725 Australian educators, who confirmed that although our teachers highly value research, they don't have adequate time available to engage with research that could lead to better classroom outcomes. The findings have been released in a new report, 'What, why, when and how - Australian educators' use of research in schools'.

Campus - 17.01.2022
University of Glasgow research brings us closer to Robert Burns the man than ever before
University of Glasgow research brings us closer to Robert Burns the man than ever before
His words and poetry are known around the world. Yet more than 250 years after his death, Robert Burns, the man, continues to remain a bit of an enigma to the public. Now academics at the University of Glasgow's Centre for Robert Burns Studies are revealing new insights into the man behind some of the world's greatest known poems and songs.

Life Sciences - Campus - 11.01.2022
Scientists Expand CRISPR-Cas9 Genetic Inheritance Control in Mammals
Biologists achieve gene conversion in male mice, broadening potential for human disease research and environmental applications Nearly three years ago University of California San Diego researchers announced the world's first CRISPR-Cas9 genetic editing-based approach to controlling inheritance in mammals.

Astronomy / Space - Campus - 11.01.2022
Researchers study Milky Way’s ’feeding habits’ in search of clues about its origins
Astronomers are one step closer to revealing the properties of dark matter enveloping our Milky Way galaxy thanks to a new map of 12 streams of stars orbiting within our galactic halo. Understanding these star streams is very important for astronomers. As well as revealing the dark matter that holds the stars in their orbits, they also tell us about the formation history of the Milky Way, revealing that the galaxy has steadily grown over billions of years by shredding and consuming smaller stellar systems.

Astronomy / Space - Campus - 10.01.2022
Black Hole Devours a Star Decades Ago, Goes Unnoticed Until Now
Every galaxy, including our own Milky Way, has at its center a massive black hole whose gravity influences the stars around it. Generally, the stars orbit around the black hole without incident, but sometimes a star will wander a little too close, and the black hole will "make a meal" of the star in a process astrophysicists have termed spaghettification.

Computer Science - Campus - 05.01.2022
System recognizes hand gestures to expand computer input on a keyboard
Preparing for an online start to the winter term: for more information. New program recognizes users' hands beside or near the keyboard and prompts operations based on different hand positions Researchers are developing a new technology that uses hand gestures to carry out commands on computers. The prototype, called "Typealike," works through a regular laptop webcam with a simple affixed mirror.

Life Sciences - Campus - 22.12.2021
Academic Education Can Positively Affect Aging of the Brain
Academic Education Can Positively Affect Aging of the Brain
The benefits of good education and lifelong learning extend into old age. The initial findings of a long-term study show that certain degenerative processes are reduced in the brains of academics. Their brains are better able to compensate age-related cognitive and neural limitations. A good education is an excellent way to embark on a successful career and develop your personality.

Life Sciences - Campus - 17.12.2021
Our brains update memories when recollections are proven wrong
Researchers from the University of Toronto have confirmed the critical role played by the brain's hippocampus in updating our memories when those recollections are shown to be inaccurate. The hippocampus is part of the brain's limbic system - the amalgam of neurological components that, among other functions, creates and retrieves our memories.