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Careers/Employment - Business/Economics
14.02.2018
Universal basic income policies don’t cause people to leave workforce, study finds
New research from the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy suggests that a universal basic income would not cause people to leave the workforce. Such proposals, including one considered by Hillary Clinton during her 2016 presidential campaign, include direct payments that ensure each resident has a baseline of income to provide for basic needs.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Careers/Employment
29.01.2018
Lead nurse explains how to engage more clinical staff in research
Lead nurse explains how to engage more clinical staff in research
Professor Mary Wells has been appointed Lead Nurse for Research at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust. Mary is a cancer nurse with a clinical academic background in health services research within oncology. In this new role, her key responsibilities are to provide professional leadership and support to research nurses and research practitioners across the trust.
Careers/Employment - Administration/Government
18.01.2018
Whitehall fails to fully exploit talents of non-exec directors, finds UCL study
Whitehall fails to fully exploit talents of non-exec directors, finds UCL study
Whitehall is failing to fully exploit the expertise of non-executive directors (NEDs) to improve the way departments' policies and plans are devised and implemented despite their high calibre, commitment and experience, a study by UCL's Constitution Unit has found. The study, which was led by Professor Robert Hazell, found civil servants "greatly valued" the advice and expertise of NEDs but that the non-executive directors themselves found the role frustrating and felt they could be much more effective if the system only allowed.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Careers/Employment
12.01.2018
Nurse staffing levels linked to patient satisfaction
Satisfaction with care in hospitals declines when patients believe there are not enough nurses on wards, according to a new study based on the NHS Inpatient Survey published in the BMJ Open . Only 14 per cent of patients who reported there was never or rarely enough nurses on the hospital ward rated their care as excellent, while 57 percent of patients who reported there were usually enough nurses rated their care as excellent.
Law/Forensics - Careers/Employment
12.01.2018
For women fighting the gender pay gap discrimination law is limited
Discrimination law has limited capacity to address the gender pay gap, writes legal expert Alice Orchiston. If women discover they are earning less than their male counterparts for the same jobs, their legal avenues for pursuing equal pay are limited. It's difficult to prove and costly to litigate. The federal Sex Discrimination Act makes it unlawful for an employer to provide less favourable terms and conditions of employment to an employee "because of" that employee's sex.
Social Sciences - Careers/Employment
20.12.2017
Five Chicago sports franchises partner with UChicago Crime Lab to address violence
For the first time, five of Chicago's professional sports teams are joining together to work on a vital social issue, lending their broad reach and resources in support of solutions to decrease violence in the city. The Chicago Bears, Chicago Blackhawks, Chicago Bulls, Chicago Cubs and Chicago White Sox, operating collectively as the Chicago Sports Alliance, today announced they will be donating a total of $1 million in one-time grants to support three programs addressing this critical issue.
Careers/Employment
19.12.2017
New approach to reducing gender inequality at work
A new approach for reducing gender inequality in the workplace has shown promise in a pilot project at several companies. It combines existing tools and adds an evaluation of places where biases could creep in to a company's procedures. At a time when many companies are feeling pressured to report on and improve gender inequality within the workforce, a Stanford sociologist is finding success with a new method for reducing the kind of bias that leads to these inequalities.
Social Sciences - Careers/Employment
15.12.2017
Gay relationships can be happier than hetero, study finds
Hot on the heels of the same-sex marriage bill, new research shows that gay and lesbian couples tend to have higher-quality relationships than their heterosexual counterparts. Professor Janeen Baxter, Director of the Life Course Centre (LCC) led by The University of Queensland, said the quality of intimate relationships of gay and lesbian people was high, if not higher than the quality of heterosexual couples' relationships.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Careers/Employment
05.12.2017
First of its kind pancreatic cancer trial to begin in Scotland
A ground-breaking new pancreatic cancer trial, which aims to match patients with more targeted and effective treatment for their tumours, is to begin in Scotland. Run by Precision-Panc, a research programme and clinical trials project led by the University of Glasgow and majority-funded by Cancer Research UK, the trial will bring a precision medicine approach to pancreatic cancer treatment for the first time in the UK.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Careers/Employment
21.11.2017
Dying in Switzerland: responding to the individual's every need
Dying in Switzerland: responding to the individual’s every need
Most people in Switzerland die in hospitals and nursing homes. Their specific needs are often not adequately met.
Sport Sciences - Careers/Employment
03.11.2017
Retired professional footballers at higher risk of knee osteoarthritis
Retired professional footballers are far more prone to develop knee pain and osteoarthritis and face problems with their knees earlier in life than the average person, a study has revealed. The study reported that male ex-footballers were two to three times more likely to suffer from knee pain and knee osteoarthritis and require a total knee replacement, even after adjustment for other risk factors including significant knee injury.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Careers/Employment
02.11.2017
Common irregular heart rate condition along with other chronic illness linked to higher death risk
Common irregular heart rate condition along with other chronic illness linked to higher death risk
Young or middle aged people with Atrial Fibrillation (AF), the most common heart rhythm abnormality, are at greater risk of death if they have other long term health conditions, according to a new study. The research, led by the University of Glasgow and published today in Europace , has suggested that AF patients, who also have other health conditions, should be prioritised for healthcare interventions.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Careers/Employment
30.10.2017
Age-friendly workplaces could make people healthier in later life
Age-friendly workplaces, work flexibility, retraining and promotion of healthy lifestyles are vital to address the major causes of not working, enable people to have longer careers and enhance wellbeing in later life. Australians could have longer careers and be healthier in later life if workplaces were more age-friendly and promoted healthy lifestyles to their employees, a new ANU study has found.
Careers/Employment - Life Sciences
16.10.2017
Women in science ask fewer questions than men, according to new research
Stereotypes suggest that women love to talk, with some studies even finding that women say three times as much as men. But, new research from a team from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, shows there is an exception to this rule: professional STEM events, which could be indicative of the wider problem of gender inequality in the field.
Careers/Employment - Business/Economics
04.10.2017
New Study, The Downside to Downtime at Work
AUSTIN, Texas - Companies in the United States pay more than $100 billion in wages every year for time that employees spend idle, according to new research from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin. In a nationally representative survey across a variety of occupational categories, McCombs Assistant Professor Andrew Brodsky and co-author Teresa Amabile of Harvard Business School found that 78.1 percent of employees experience idle time at work, with 21.7 percent of employees experiencing idle time on a daily basis.
Careers/Employment
03.10.2017
Link between childhood in care and mums who have babies removed by the courts
Link between childhood in care and mums who have babies removed by the courts
A study has found a high number of women, who repeatedly appear before the family courts and lose many children into public care or adoption because of child protection concerns, have been in care themselves. 40% of the mothers had been in foster care or children's homes with a further 14% living in private or informal relationships away from their parents.
Business/Economics - Careers/Employment
11.09.2017
Employee outsourcing hides slaves in the workforce, shows research
Employee outsourcing hides slaves in the workforce, shows research
Failure to monitor outsourced recruitment is resulting in companies inadvertently employing victims of modern slavery, according to new research led by our School of Management. Interview The research, conducted with the University of Sheffield, suggests that layers of outsourcing, subcontracting and informal hiring of temporary staff are to blame.
Careers/Employment - Social Sciences
07.09.2017
The 13 factors for a successful career
The 13 factors for a successful career
What determines career success' This question has occupied career research, career counseling, organisations and private persons for decades. With the help of a new questionnaire, Bern researchers from the department of work and organisational psychology have now identified the important resources for a successful career.
Careers/Employment
05.09.2017
How retractions hurt scientists' credibility
How retractions hurt scientists’ credibility
Life scientists who have published papers that are retracted by journals subsequently suffer a 10 percent drop in citations of their remaining work, compared to similar but unaffected scientists, according to a new study by MIT researchers. Examining hundreds of cases over a 30-year period, the research quantifies the extent that one discredited study - whether an act of malfeasance or a sloppy piece of research - has on the overall reputation of academic scientists.
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