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History / Archeology - Chemistry - 27.09.2022
Scientific analysis of Germany's oldest beer
Scientific analysis of Germany’s oldest beer
Study shows molecular profile of 19th-century beer sample Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have opened a sample of lager beer that was stored at constant room temperature for over 140 years. The beer, brewed in 1885, was analyzed in terms of its sensory properties and chemical composition.

Agronomy / Food Science - Chemistry - 27.09.2022
Germany's oldest beer scientifically considered
Germany’s oldest beer scientifically considered
Study reveals molecular profile of 19th century beer sample After almost 140 years, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) opened a lager beer that had been kept at room temperature throughout to analyze it. The beer, dating back to 1885, has now been characterized sensorially and analytically.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 22.09.2022
What the 'prey' of a peregrine falcon tells us about the beginnings of our solar system
What the ’prey’ of a peregrine falcon tells us about the beginnings of our solar system
An international research team led by Tomoki Nakamura (Tohoku, Japan) has studied soil samples collected by the Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa-2 on the asteroid Ryugu. Falko Langenhorst of Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, Germany, was part of the group that gained insights into the formation of the asteroid and the unique processes that took place during the first five million years after the birth of our solar system from the analysis of the extraterrestrial material.

Chemistry - Environment - 22.09.2022
Green hydrogen at sea cheaper and more sustainable
Green hydrogen at sea cheaper and more sustainable
Researchers from Wageningen University & Research have shown that the production costs of green hydrogen via electrolysis at sea can be reduced by making Ultra-Pure Water (UPW) on site by means of membrane distillation.

Health - Chemistry - 22.09.2022
Fighting fungal infections with metals
Fighting fungal infections with metals
An international collaboration led by researchers from the University of Bern and the University of Queensland in Australia has demonstrated that chemical compounds containing special metals are highly effective in fighting dangerous fungal infections. These results could be used to develop innovative drugs which are effective against resistant bacteria and fungi.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.09.2022
Chiral oxide catalysts align electron spin
Chiral oxide catalysts align electron spin
Controlling the spin of electrons opens up future scenarios for applications in spin-based electronics (spintronics), for example in data processing. It also presents new opportunities for controlling the selectivity and efficiency of chemical reactions. Researchers recently presented first successes with the example of water splitting for producing "green" hydrogen and oxygen.

Environment - Chemistry - 20.09.2022
Mirror molecules reveal drought stress in forests
Mirror molecules reveal drought stress in forests
Changes in ecosystems can be predicted more accurately via emissions of chiral compounds Worldwide, plants release about 100 million tonnes of monoterpenes into the atmosphere. These volatile organic molecules include many fragrances such as the molecule pinene, known for its fresh pine scent. Since these molecules are very reactive and can form tiny aerosol particles that can grow into condensation nuclei for raindrops, natural emissions play an important role in our climate.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 20.09.2022
Insights into two rare types of photosynthesis could boost crop production
Researchers have studied how certain bacteria perform photosynthesis using low-energy light, which could be engineered into crops to boost production. By studying the way two bacteria perform the difficult chemistry of photosynthesis, a team led by researchers have discovered the trade-offs they make when using lower-energy light.

Health - Chemistry - 20.09.2022
New radiolabelling method for personalised cancer treatment
Researchers from TU Delft have found a new method to efficiently make nano carriers loaded with radioactive salts for both medical imaging and treatment. Because the assembly of these nano carriers is incredibly simple, the innovation is very suitable for clinical research and treatments of cancer patients.

Chemistry - 19.09.2022
Proving safety of chemicals without animal studies
New research by, among others, Hans Bouwmeester (Toxicology) and Phil Macnaghten (Knowledge, Technology and Innovation) of Wageningen University & Research, revolves around the value we attach to animal testing. The results of animal-free results are not always (legally) accepted, which means that animal testing is still necessary.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 14.09.2022
New phases of water detected
New phases of water detected
One way to visualise this phase is that the oxygen atoms form a solid lattice, and protons flow like a liquid through the lattice, like kids running through a maze Venkat Kapil Scientists at the University of Cambridge have discovered that water in a one-molecule layer acts like neither a liquid nor a solid, and that it becomes highly conductive at high pressures.

Chemistry - Physics - 14.09.2022
New Oxidation State of Rhodium
Previously unknown oxidation state of rhodium(VII) could play a role in chemical reactions Mayara da Silva Santos , doctoral candidate at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Physics, has discovered a new oxidation state of rhodium. This chemical element is one of the most catalytically important platinum-group metals and is used, for example, in catalytic converters for automobiles.

Chemistry - 13.09.2022
Reactor that can destroy 'forever chemicals'
Reactor that can destroy ’forever chemicals’
"Forever chemicals,” named for their ability to persist in water and soil, are a class of molecules that are ever-present in our daily lives, including food packaging and household cleaning products. Because these chemicals don't break down, they end up in our water and food, and they can lead to health effects, such as cancer or decreased fertility.

Chemistry - Physics - 12.09.2022
When the chemistry is (not) right: Influence of the microscopic environment
When the chemistry is (not) right: Influence of the microscopic environment
Research team investigates reactivity of single molecules under controlled conditions Researchers around the world are working to develop efficient materials to convert CO2 into usable chemical substances. This is especially important in light of global warming. A team from the University of Göttingen and the Ulsan National Institute for Science, South Korea, has found a promising approach: Catalytically active molecules are anchored to a surface that serves as a conductive electron supplier.

Chemistry - Physics - 12.09.2022
Making and breaking of chemical bonds in single 'nanoconfined' molecules
Making and breaking of chemical bonds in single ’nanoconfined’ molecules
Research team investigates reactivity of single molecules under controlled microscopic conditions Researchers around the world are working to develop efficient materials to convert CO2 into usable chemical substances - work that is particularly pressing in view of global warming.

Chemistry - Environment - 09.09.2022
Ammonia: ’a trump card for the energy transition process’
During his internship as a Chemical Technology student at Danish company Haldor Topsøe, UT PhD researcher Kevin Rouwenhorst realised the many opportunities offered by ammonia. At the moment, it is principally used to manufacture artificial fertiliser and therefore has a bad name. But ammonia is also one of seven chemicals that form the basis of all chemical products, and it helps to feed around 50% of the world's population.

Chemistry - Environment - 08.09.2022
Research team investigating 'forever chemicals' in water systems
Research team investigating ’forever chemicals’ in water systems
Researchers at Western's Institute for Chemicals and Fuels from Alternative Resources (ICFAR) a nd collaborators from academia, government and industry are identifying and treating 'forever chemicals' in water systems, an ever-increasing environmental concern which affects more than 2.5 million Canadians.

Physics - Chemistry - 07.09.2022
Researchers study catalytic activity of copper atoms
Researchers study catalytic activity of copper atoms
Fuel cells convert chemical reaction energy into electric power and heat. They are used, for example for the development of electric vehicles, in aviation and aeronautics or for sustainable energy supplies. During the conversion of energy, the catalytic reduction of oxygen plays an important role. Therefore, the development of efficient, inexpensive catalysts is extremely important.

Health - Chemistry - 07.09.2022
Parkinson’s breakthrough can diagnose disease from skin swabs in 3 minutes
A new method to detect Parkinson's disease has been determined by analysing sebum with mass spectrometry. The study, published today in the Journal of the American Chemical Society , have found that there are lipids of high molecular weight that are substantially more active in people suffering from Parkinson's disease.

Physics - Chemistry - 07.09.2022
Pipes two million times smaller than an ant
Pipes two million times smaller than an ant
Working on microscopic pipes only a millionth as wide as a single strand of human hair, Johns Hopkins researchers have engineered a way to ensure that these tiniest of pipes are safe from the tiniest of leaks. Leak-free piping, made with nanotubes that self-assemble, self-repair, and can connect themselves to different biostructures, is a significant step toward creating a nanotube network that one day might deliver specialized drugs, proteins, and molecules to targeted cells in the human body.
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