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Law - Computer Science - 03.04.2020
What removing legal threat to research that exposes online discrimination means
What removing legal threat to research that exposes online discrimination means
FACULTY Q&A A federal court has cleared the way for academic researchers, computer scientists and journalists to continue work that investigates online company practices for racial, gender or other discrimination. The ruling means that those who research online companies no longer have to fear prosecution for the work they do to hold tech companies accountable for their practices, said Christian Sandvig , the H Marshall McLuhan Collegiate Professor of Digital Media, professor of information and director of the Center for Ethics, Society, and Computing at the University of Michigan.

Health - Computer Science - 02.04.2020
Creating an Early Alert System for COVID-19
Researchers combine power of wearable device and big data analytics to track spread and early signs of infection—including among healthcare workers T o better understand early signs of coronavirus and the virus' spread, physicians around the country and data scientists at UC San Diego are working together to use a wearable device to monitor more than 12,000 people, including thousands of healthcare workers.

Health - Computer Science - 02.04.2020
Software to enable secure data-sharing for hospitals
Software to enable secure data-sharing for hospitals
The MedCo system aims to facilitate medical research on pathologies - such as cancer and infectious diseases - by enabling secure computations on decentralized data. The unique software has recently been deployed at three Swiss hospitals. MedCo was first released in 2019 as the first operational system to protect sensitive patient data so that it can be used collectively for medical research.

Earth Sciences - Computer Science - 31.03.2020
Shows potential for using fiber-optic networks to assess ground motions during earthquakes
Shows potential for using fiber-optic networks to assess ground motions during earthquakes
A new study from a University of Michigan researcher and colleagues at three institutions demonstrates the potential for using existing networks of buried optical fibers as an inexpensive observatory for monitoring and studying earthquakes. The study provides new evidence that the same optical fibers that deliver high-speed internet and HD video to our homes could one day double as seismic sensors.

Computer Science - 27.03.2020
Security flaw that would enable hackers to copy millions of car keys
Security flaw that would enable hackers to copy millions of car keys
A team of researchers from the COSIC research group at KU Leuven and from the University of Birmingham has discovered that a wide range of car models produced by Toyota, Kia and Hyundai use weak cryptographic keys. This makes it easy to clone the key fob transponder. It is likely that millions of cars are affected.

Computer Science - Microtechnics - 27.03.2020
COVID-19 Should Be Wake-Up Call for Robotics Research
Pandemic response requires "dull, dirty, dangerous" jobs suited for robots Robots could perform some of the "dull, dirty and dangerous" jobs associated with combating the COVID-19 pandemic, but that would require many new capabilities not currently being funded or developed, an editorial Robotics argues.

Materials Science - Computer Science - 26.03.2020
Designing lightweight glass for efficient cars, wind turbines
Designing lightweight glass for efficient cars, wind turbines
FACULTY Q&A Liang Qi , a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Michigan, answered questions about his group's new paper in npj Computational Materials. What is elastic stiffness' Elastic and glass don't seem to be two words that go together. All solid materials, including glass, have a property called elastic stiffness-also known as elastic modulus.

Computer Science - 23.03.2020
Automated speech recognition less accurate for blacks
The disparity likely occurs because such technologies are based on machine learning systems that rely heavily on databases of English as spoken by white Americans. The technology that powers the nation's leading automated speech recognition systems makes twice as many errors when interpreting words spoken by African Americans as when interpreting the same words spoken by whites, according to a new study by researchers at Stanford Engineering.

Microtechnics - Computer Science - 19.03.2020
This Drone Can Play Dodgeball - And Win
This Drone Can Play Dodgeball - And Win
Using a novel type of cameras, researchers from the University of Zurich have demonstrated a flying robot that can detect and avoid fast-moving objects. A step towards drones that can fly faster in harsh environments, accomplishing more in less time. Drones can do many things, but avoiding obstacles is not their strongest suit yet - especially when they move quickly.

Computer Science - Microtechnics - 16.03.2020
Allowing robots to feel
Allowing robots to feel
With the help of machine learning, ETH researchers have developed a novel yet low-cost tactile sensor. The sensor measures force distribution at high resolution and with great accuracy, enabling robot arms to grasp sensitive or fragile objects. We humans have no problem picking up fragile or slippery objects with our hands.

Physics - Computer Science - 13.03.2020
New microscopy technique helps pictures tell a thousand words
A new imaging method combined with machine learning uncovers previously hidden information in micrographs of biological cells to reveal quantitative information of gene expression levels. Researchers from the University of Glasgow's James Watt School of Engineering and School of Computing Science describe in a paper published today how they have used image analysis and machine learning as a tool to directly determine the gene activity in single cells.

Physics - Computer Science - 12.03.2020
Novel error-correction scheme developed for quantum computers
Novel error-correction scheme developed for quantum computers
Experimental quantum computers are plagued with errors. Here Dr Arne Grimsmo from the School of Physics and colleagues from RMIT and the University of Queensland offer a new way to reduce errors across different types of quantum hardware. Scientists in Australia have developed a new approach to reducing the errors that plague experimental quantum computers; a step that could remove a critical roadblock preventing them scaling up to full working machines.

Computer Science - 10.03.2020
Intel processors are still vulnerable to attack
Intel processors are still vulnerable to attack
Computer scientists at KU Leuven have once again exposed a security flaw in Intel processors. Jo Van Bulck and Frank Piessens gave the manufacturer one year's time to fix the problem. Now that the embargo has lifted, the KU Leuven team and their colleagues in Austria, the United States, and Australia can share their findings.

Computer Science - 10.03.2020
New security vulnerability in Intel processors: Load Value Injection
New security vulnerability in Intel processors: Load Value Injection
Security researchers at Graz University of Technology together with an international team have once again uncovered a serious security hole in computer processors. With the new security hole published under the name "Load Value Injection", there is another method to read out sensitive data. Spectre, Meltdown , Foreshadow, ZombieLoad und Plundervolt.

Computer Science - Physics - 10.03.2020
Introducing the light-operated hard drives of tomorrow
Introducing the light-operated hard drives of tomorrow
What do you get when you place a thin film of perovkite material used in solar cells on top of a magnetic substrate? More efficient hard drive technology. EPFL physicist László Forró and his team pave the way for the future of data storage. "The key was to get the technology to work at room temperature," explains László Forró, EPFL physicist.

Computer Science - Microtechnics - 09.03.2020
Robots that admit mistakes foster better conversation in humans
Three people and a robot form a team playing a game. The robot makes a mistake, costing the team a round. Like any good teammate, it acknowledges the error. " Sorry, guys, I made the mistake this round," it says. "I know it may be hard to believe, but robots make mistakes too." This scenario occurred multiple times during a Yale-led study of robots' effects on human-to-human interactions.

Computer Science - 08.03.2020
The elephant in the server room
The elephant in the server room
Catherine D'Ignazio's new book, "Data Feminism," examines problems of bias and power that beset modern information. Suppose you would like to know mortality rates for women during childbirth, by country, around the world. Where would you look? One option is the WomanStats Project, the website of an academic research effort investigating the links between the security and activities of nation-states, and the security of the women who live in them.

Computer Science - 07.03.2020
"Doing machine learning the right way"
Professor Aleksander Madry strives to build machine-learning models that are more reliable, understandable, and robust. The work of MIT computer scientist Aleksander Madry is fueled by one core mission: "doing machine learning the right way." Madry's research centers largely on making machine learning - a type of artificial intelligence - more accurate, efficient, and robust against errors.

Computer Science - 05.03.2020
Neural Hardware for Image Recognition in Nanoseconds
Neural Hardware for Image Recognition in Nanoseconds
An ultra-fast image sensor with a built-in neural network has been developed at TU Wien (Vienna). It can be trained to recognize certain objects. It has now been presented in "Nature". Automatic image recognition is widely used today: There are computer programs that can reliably diagnose skin cancer, navigate self-driving cars, or control robots.

Computer Science - Microtechnics - 05.03.2020
Showing robots how to do your chores
Showing robots how to do your chores
By observing humans, robots learn to perform complex tasks, such as setting a table. Roboticists are developing automated robots that can learn new tasks solely by observing humans. At home, you might someday show a domestic robot how to do routine chores. In the workplace, you could train robots like new employees, showing them how to perform many duties.